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AUGUST 8 


2014 


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iCHRONIGLE 



CONTENTS 


VOLUME 33, 
NUMBER 50 ir 
AUGUST 8, 2014 


6 POSTMARKS 

NEWS 

11 POINT AUSTIN 

BY MICHAEL KING 

12 THEN THERE’S THIS 

BY AMY SMITH 

14 TCRP Sues Uber, Lyft, and Yellow Cab; S-Comm 
Troubles: Not Just for Latinos!; HB 2 Goes on 
Trial; and more 

22 THE HIGHTOWER REPORT 

BY JIM HIGHTOWER 

24 A GREAT BIG BUNDLE OF RAIL AND ROADS 

Council moves transportation bonds toward a 
November vote 

BY MAC MCCANN 

29 LETTERS AT SAM 

BY MICHAEL VENTURA 

ARTS 

30 Vortex goes out of this world for cosplay; and 
Douglas Brinkley unspools Nixon’s legacy 

31 THE GOOD EYE 

BY AMY GENTRY 

32 ‘BUY WHAT YOU LOVE’ 

Collector Glenn Fuhrman on ‘A Secret Affair’ 
and living with contemporary art 

BY SETH ORION SCHWAIGER 

34 EXHIBITIONISM 

The Who's Tommy, This Is Our Youth, and 
‘Advanced Young Artists: The Teen + 

Mentor Show’ 

FOOD 

37 Firehouse Lounge and Hostel, Food-o-File, Meal 
Times 

38 PLEASE LICK THE ART 

Keith Kreeger’s ceramics get up close and per- 
sonal 

BY MELANIE HAUPT 

40 REVIEW 

Daawat Indian Cuisine 


ONLINE ONLY THIS WEEK 

FOOD 

Emerging Austin food trends 

MUSIC 

The Both and brothers Aivin in fuii, pius White 
Denim and Michaei Bubie Live Shots 

ARTS 

Dougias Brinkiey on reiocating to Texas; and 
Link & Pin Gaiiery’s “Between Time and 
Space” reviewed 

PHOTOS 

Aii Doiis Are Art Conference 


SCREENS 

41 August is Roger Corman appreciation month at 
the AFS; and Mondo launches a new line of col- 
lectibles 

42 THE REALITIES OF VIRTUAL REALITY 

Locals look into VR and see more than video 
games 

BY JAMES RENOVITCH 

MUSIC 

47 PLAYBACK 

After reorganizing, Antone’s resurrection is 
imminent 

BY KEVIN CURTIN 

48 MONDO PLATTERS 

Summer clearance of Texas Platters, from Adrian 
& the Sickness to ZZ Top 


55 NEWS OF THE WEIRD 


CALENDAR 

52 THIS WEEK 

We all scream for this Saturday’s Ice Cream 
Festival at Fiesta Gardens 

THE ARTS 

GAY PLACE 

BY KATE X MESSER 

DAY TRIPS 

BY GERALD E. MCLEOD 

SOCCER WATCH 

BY NICK BARBARO 

60 FILM Into the Storm, The Hundred-Foot 
Journey, Magic in the Moonlight 

62 SHOWTIMES 

68 MUSIC RECOMMENDED 

Duos speak - the Both and brothers Alvin 
- plus Walter Salas-Humara, Alejandro 
Escovedo, Wanda Jackson, John Mayall, 
Charlie Mars, Casket Girls, the Hold Steady, 
Off!, Nine Inch Nails, Soundgarden, Dillinger 
Escape Plan, Maxwell, and much more 

72 VENUES 

74 ROADSHOWS + CLUB LISTINGS 

BACK 

82 A SHOT IN THE DARK 

COMIX 

THE LUV DOC 
MR. SMARTY PANTS 

83 CLASSIFIEDS 

90 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY 




PUBLISHER 

Nick Barbaro 

EDITOR 

Louis Black 


SENIOR EDITORS 

MANAGING EDITOR Kimberley Jones 
FILM Marjorie Baumgarten 
NEWS MANAGING EDITOR Amy Smith 
ASSOCIATE NEWS EDITOR Mary Tuma 
GAMING, TECHNOLOGY, SOCIAL MEDIA 
James Renovitch 

CALENDAR 

ARTS LISTINGS Wayne Alan Brenner 

MUSIC LISTINGS Anne Harris 

STAFF WRITERS 

Kevin Curtin, Chase Hoffberger, Richard 


NEWS Michael King 
MUSIC Raoul Hernandez 
FOOD Brandon Watson 
ARTS Robert Faires 

SPECIAL ISSUES, GUIDES, INTERNS 

Kate X Messer 


COMMUNITY LISTINGS, SPECIAL SCREENINGS 

Josh Kupecki 


Whittaker, Virginia B. Wood 


CONTRIBUTING WRITERS 


DAY TRIPS Gerald E. McLeod MR. SMARTY PANTS R.U. Steinberg 

LETTERS AT SAM Michael Ventura THE GOOD EYE Amy Gentry 


PRODUCTION 

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Jason stout 

PRODUCTION MANAGER Chris Linnen WEB DIRECTOR Brian Barry 
WEB DEVELOPER Alex Meyer DIGITAL STRATEGY Michael Bartnett 

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Zeke Barbaro, Shelley Hiam, Carrie Lewis 
STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS John Anderson, Jana Birchum 
PROOFREADERS Amy Kamp, Danielle White, Adrienne Whitehorse 
INTERNS Neha Aziz, Robert Cohen, Waylon Cunningham, David Estiund, Jordan Gass- 
Poore, Claire Gordon, Nina Hernandez, Lizzie Jesperson, Andrea Kinnison, Sarah 
Marloff, Sarah Mortimer, Carmen Rising, Kali Robinson 


ADVERTISING 

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Mark Bartel 
ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Cassidy Frazier 

SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Jerald Corder, Bobby Leath, Elizabeth Nitz, Carolyn 
Phillips, Lois Richwine 

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Jeff Carlyon, Christopher Holston, Patricia Morales, Rebecca 
Reinhardt, Angela Specht 
LEGAL NOTICES Jessica Nesbitt 

ADVERTISING OPERATIONS COORDINATOR Kristine Tofte 
ADVERTISING PROMOTIONS COORDINATOR Derek Van Wagner 
MARKETING DIRECTOR/SPECIAL EVENTS Sarah Wolf 
PROMOTIONS DIRECTOR/PERSONALS/CIRCULATION Dan Hardick 
PROMOTIONS MANAGER Lia Crockett 

CHRONTOURAGE Patrick Coley, Natasha Day, Parisa Kosari, Camille Morell, Andrew 
Osegi, Sarah Sharif 

NATIONAL ADVERTISING Voice Media Group (888/278-9866, www.voicemediagroup.com) 

OFFIGE STAFF 

CONTROLLER Liz Franklin 

SUBSCRIPTIONS Jessi Cape CREDIT MANAGER cindy soo 

ACCOUNTING ASSISTANT Cassandra Pearce INFO CENTER Anna Toon 
SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATOR Brandon Watkins GUIDE DOG Hank 
EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT TO THE EDITOR Alicia Rutledge 


GIRGULATION 


Perry Drake, Tom Fairchild, Ruben Flores, Jonina Foel-Sommers, Brent Malkus, 

Fric McKinney, Grant Melcher, Paul Minor, Norm Reed, Dane Richardson, Fric 
Shuman, Zeb Sommers, Chris Volloy, Nicholas Wibbelsman, John Williamson, 

Bryan Zirkelbach 

GONTRIBUTORS 

Neph Basedow, Greg Beets, Rob Brezsny, Jim Caligiuri, Tony Cantu, Doug Freeman, 
Caitlin Greenwood, Melanie Haupt, Nina Hernandez, Sam Hurt, Abby Johnston, Amy 
Kamp, Rod Machen, Mac McCann, Gary Miller, Tony Millionaire, Adam Roberts, 
Robyn Ross, Grade Salem, Scott Schinder, Seth Orion Schwaiger, Chuck Shepherd, 
Stacy Alexander Smith, Jen Sorensen, Tim Stegall, Michael Toland, Tom Tomorrow, 
Roy Tompkins, Mick Vann, Todd V. Wolfson 


The Austin Chronicle offers nonpaying internships. 

Contact Kate X Messer at the intern hotline, 512/454-5765 x303. 


austinchronicle.com 



Barton Springs Fest, Sat., Aug. 9, includes yoga, 
poetry, live music, and more! 


kfi VERIFIED 

• * AUDIT CIRCULATION 

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Corporation weekly 52 times per year at 4000 N. 1-35, Austin, TX 78751. 
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Postmarks 

WHO REALLY NEEDS 'SENSITIVITY 
TRAINING? 

Dear Editor, 

What a tempest in a B-cup [“Anatomy of an 
Understanding,” News, Aug. 1]. First, kudos to 
Petticoat Fair owner Kirk Andrews for going above 
and beyond good customer service in his extreme- 
ly kind and sensitive response to Kylie Jack. (I was 
disgusted to read that his good intentions were 
dismissed by some because he used the term 
“transgendered” rather than “transgender.” Can’t 
stand this type of Orwellian language-police.) 

Second, I question Kylie Jack’s handling of the 
situation to begin with. In all of my years of cloth- 
ing/lingerie shopping, I’ve come across a few sales 
clerks that I considered rude. In almost every 
such case, I’ve simply asked to speak to the store 
manager on duty, voiced my complaint to him/her 
directly, and was uniformly immediately issued an 


apology and an assurance that the clerk would 
be talked to. Did Jack follow this common-sense 
route? Nah. Instead, rather than handling the situa- 
tion one-on-one, she took the coward’s way out and 
went on an Internet vendetta that led to the store 
and its owners “receiving threats of continued 
harassment and, in some cases, implied violence.” 
(Who was the bully and who the bullied here?) 

continued onp.8 


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austinchronicle.com AUGUST 8, 2014 the Austin chronicle 7 










continued from p.6 


"A % n w 1 > 



Third, as the article made absolutely clear, 
every member of the female sales staff at 
Petticoat Fair had at one time or another been 
subjected to “men with nefarious intentions” 
(aka "creepers,” aka men coming in to the store 
dressed as women and trying to get off on hav- 
ing the female clerks intimately measure them). 
Given this fact, why is a female clerk’s being wary 
of someone with a penis asking to be intimately 
measured in a close space considered question- 
able? Her reaction seems perfectly logical to me. 

Lastly, there’s the ignorant comment of Lisa 
Scheps of the Transgender Education Network 
of Texas, who hosted a “Trans 101” “sensitivity 
training” course for the staff of Petticoat Fair. 
When owner Andrews tried to explain the store’s 
reality of “creepers” to her, Scheps replied, 
“Yeah, how many times does that really hap- 
pen? When an impostor tries to come in here?” 
When Andrews pointed out that his entire staff 
said that they dealt with the issue “all the time,” 
Scheps’ glib reply was: “Creepers gonna creep.” 
Who’s the one needing the “sensitivity training”? 

Stephanie Jones 
[Editor’s note: As the story reported, Kyiie Jack, 
as weii as the store and its owners, were subject 
to threats and impiied vioience.] 

EDUCATION DAMAGED BY IDEOLOGY 

Dear Editor, 

Your article, “SBOE: No Scholars Need Apply” 
[News, July 25], is right on target in showing the 
problem of politicizing education, but politicization 
comes from both ends of the spectrum. Verity 
Educate has produced scholarly and expert analy- 


sis and reports on the factual accuracy of cur- 
ricula and textbooks across the country, including 
for this current SBOE adoption, and every partisan 
group we encounter seems to decry inaccuracy 
until the inaccuracy is what they desire. 

There are shocking inaccuracies in these 
proposed Texas textbooks that form a range of 
poor lessons, including a minimization of the 
struggles of African-Americans, a minimization of 
the dangers of historical communism, a minimi- 
zation of the ideology of modern terrorists, and 
regular misinterpretations of primary sources. 
The textbooks are also rife with politically neutral 
information that is simply incorrect. Fixing all 
of these inaccuracies should not be a partisan 
issue. Good, honest, and accurate education is 
beneficial for everyone. 


The truth is that even academics would not 
be capable of sufficiently analyzing the material 
under the constraints of the SBOE plan. Also, 
while a Ph.D. is a credential of experience and 
expertise, it does not indicate objectivity. As cur- 
ricular material continues to be politicized - as 
seen in the article - objectivity and faithfulness 
to the truth are paramount in analyzing it. 

Eiien R. Waid, 
Executive Director, Verity Educate 

LIVE IN THE PRESENT; FACE THE FUTURE 

Dear Editor, 

You can label me as “too supportive” of the 
superintendent’s position [“Wanted for Ballot: 


AISD Candidates,” News, Aug. 1], since I advo- 
cate for students across the district and that 
requires that I work in partnership and col- 
laboratively with people from all walks of life. 
That the superintendent is one of 10 leaders 
making decisions that impact our students and 
our city is why I am supportive of that position. 
People with a mentality that is stuck in the 
past (hello, Carstarphen is gone - moved away 
months ago and we can’t let that go?) are very 
good at complaining, attacking, and mudsling- 
ing, but where are their solutions? AISD faces 
tremendous challenges these next few years. 
It’s time to refocus and get back to work to 
discover solutions, instead of bringing up the 
past again and again. 

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THE HIGHTOWER REPORT 




A GREAT BIG BUNDLE OF RAIL AND ROADS 








tmjs 

CATHOLIC 

WE^PS 

FDR 

SUFFERING^ 
TEXAS 
WOHEN 


F 

: r I . 

Pro-and-anti-choice demonstrators -4 
/ outside the federal courthouse ] ^ 

Monday, as lawyers on both sides of 
the abortion debate squared off. See 
<^«We Won’t Back Down/” p.lS. 


More Connected Than Thou 

MULTIMODAL OBJECTIONS TO A MULTIMODAL PROJECT 


A 


If all goes as planned, City Council will 
vote today (Aug. 7) to approve the municipal 
election scheduled for Nov. 4, and to include 
on that ballot a transportation bond, esti- 
mated at a total of $1 billion - $600 million 
for the rail project known as Project Connect 
and $400 million for road projects, a few of 
which could also serve (down the line) for 
multimodal connections to the rail 
project. The overall details are 
addressed by Mac McCann 
in this issue (“A Great Big 
Bundle of Rail and 
Roads,” p.24) and in pre- 
vious coverage (particu- 
larly, “Pondering the 
Bond,” Aug. 1). 

I won’t rehearse the 
road projects here 
except to note that the 
proposed upgrade to the 
I-35/Riverside exchange is 
long overdue (not accelerat 
ed, I suppose, by TxDOT’s cur 
rent penurious condition). The 

Statesman grumbled that several of the 
“road” projects also have elements that 
would support future rail; if they don’t 
understand “multimodal” by now, I can’t 
help them. We cannot work our way out of 


BY MICHAEL 


/^USTI]^ 


KING 


our current (and growing) transportation 
problems with a single solution - the pri- 
mary reason that “roads or rail” is such a 
pointless argument. 

Will voters endorse this undeniably expen- 
sive package? Hard to tell; it might weU be 
more expensive to do nothing, but that’s a 
very difficult argument to sell. If the election 
were held today, the prospects would 
be poor - the public campaigns 
haven’t really begun. But 
some folks have pointed out 
that we’re about where we 
were at this time for the 
Central Health district 
tax vote in 2012, and that 
won handily. 

The wild cards this 
year include the fall vote 
- presumably a broader 
and deeper electorate than 
May - and the still fairly cha- 
otic 10-1 Council races, where 
most candidates (waiting for the 
precise ballot) haven’t yet declared 
themselves on the bond, although a few 
have made it clear they’ll oppose any rail 
project. That’s to be expected from hard- 
core anti-taxers, who routinely specialize in 
cutting off the public’s nose to spite its face. 




UeatUinesL 


The Shadow Knows 

More curious is the opposition from a small 
but vociferous group of “transit advocates” 
who have adamantly opposed this Project 
Connect rail project for one reason only: 
because the northern part of the project is 
planned to travel up the Highland Corridor (a 
more easterly route) rather than up 
Guadalupe/Lamar. Those folks - associated 
with several overlapping groups with small 
memberships but loud social media presence 
- insist that G/L is the only possible route, and 
that this project must be stopped now and 
replaced (in some future City HaU utopia) by 
one that goes the way they insist it must go. 

Today’s news feature recounts those argu- 
ments in more detail, but it’s worth empha- 
sizing that the planners in charge of the 
project insist they’ve reviewed all the possi- 
bilities in technical detail and that the 
Highland route represents the best initial 

continued on p.l2 


> City Council, knee-deep in budget review, 
resumes formai meetings today (Thursday, Aug. 

7) with a daunting agenda, inciuding setting the 
November eiection (and transportation bond pro- 
posai), board and commission revisions, and a 
host of other matters. If you’re attending, this 
week it’s at Commissioners Court, 700 Lavaca. 
See “Councii: Come As You Are,” p.l4. 

> Mayorai candidate Steve Adler formaiiy fiied for 
the baiiot this week, and announced his support 
for a property tax homestead exemption, to be 
phased in over four years. His major opponents, 
Councii Member Mike Martinez and Mayor Pro 
Tern Sheryl Cole (not yet fiied), responded that 
Adier shouid expiain how he intends to recoup 
the $36 miiiion cost of such an exemption. 

> As of Wednesday morning, 23 mayorai and 
Councii candidates had fiied their officiai ballot 
applications; more than 70 have fiied campaign 
treasurer designations. The baiiot deadiine is 
Monday, Aug. 18. 

> Austin’s Foundation Communities has received 
$30 miiiion in state funding to buiid three new 
affordable housing communities for iow-income 
famiiies and aduits. This wiii enabie construction 
of some 293 “deepiy affordabie” housing units 
in north, south, and southwest Austin. 

> Wanted: AISD candidates. At press time, there 
had been no new fiiings for the November board 
eiections since Robert Schneider (District 7) 
and Monica Sanchez (District 6) iast week. 
At-Large incumbent Tamala Barksdale and 
potentiai District 6 chaiienger Paul Saldana are 
expected to make announcements next week. 

> “That’s doabie,” said Bernie Ecclestone’s attor- 
ney Sven Thomas, when asked by the Judge in 
Ecciestone’s bribery trial in German court if the 
Formula One kingpin couid make a $100 miiiion 
settiement payment “within the week.” The set- 
tiement ends the triai of the biiiionaire, with no 
admission of guiit; he is free to return to his 
controi of the sport and try to put its financiai 
house in order. 

> On Aug. 13, the Sunset Advisory Commission 

is expected to take a vote on a controversiai rec- 
ommendation that wouid shutter six state sup- 
ported living centers, inciuding the Austin 
SSLC on West 35th. Meanwhiie, the center, 
which houses 280 inteiiectuaiiy and deveiopmen- 
taiiy disabied and medicaiiy fragiie residents, has 
its own pians to ciose down seven cottages and 
move out 72 residents by the end of November. 

> Seems iike Gov. Rick Perry is ready to risk 
embarrassing himseif on the nationai stage 
again. After fiaming out in the 2012 presidentiai 
race, he has formed a new federai PAG, the 
imaginativeiy named RickPAC, as the first stage 
in a presumed 2016 run. 

> Perry may run nationaiiy as the border security 
guy, but he stiii faces tough questions at home. 
The Legislative Budget Board met on Aug. 5, 
to discuss Perry’s uniiaterai decision to switch 
$38 miiiion intended for iaw enforcement radios 
to pay for National Guard border patrois, and 
whether that operation is working. 


QUOTE 

of the 

WEEK 



“It’s not acceptable 
that the governor’s 
office is for sale.” 

- Wendy Davis on Greg Abbott’s 
pay-to-play campaign contributions 


austinchronicle.com AUGUST 8, 2014 the Austin chronicle 11 







POINT AUSTIN continued from p.ll 

north-side route in the extended time frame 
such a project requires. Longtime city com- 
missioner Dave Sullivan, who served on the 
Central Corridor Advisory Group, told me 
this week that the argument essentially 
turns on whether one gives more weight to 
“present or future” population density - in 
view of the years it takes to implement this 
project, the planners claim that the 
Highland Corridor makes more sense for 
the initial rail investment. 

Are they certainly right? I don’t know, 
but neither do the opponents. Folks from 
AURA, Our Rail, Austin Rail Now, etc., not 
only argue that G/L is the only possible 
route, but that the public officials, planners, 
and advisory group members have unfairly 
thumbed the scales, fixed the numbers, and 
intentionally worked to promote a bad 
route certain to fail because ... who knows? 
Since “developers” are an all-purpose pejo- 
rative in Austin political parlance, “devel- 
opers” must obviously be behind the whole 
evil project, also motivated to promote a 
bad route that will fail, along with their 
developments, because ... indeed, who 
knows? [Ed. note: For the answers to these 
and other questions, see “Most of This Is 
Horseshit,” in comments to this story online.] 

Bad Faith 

Of late, opponents have accused the 
planning team of lying and unethical 
behavior, and of “promoting” the project 
instead of just describing it neutrally, and 
even of failing to repeat the opponents’ 
arguments for them. This week, a couple 
of those opponents, Scott Morris and 
Lyndon Henry - representing yet more 
fleeting groupuscules - charged, in a 
lengthy press release, that Project Connect 
had surreptitiously and deceptively with- 
drawn from the Federal Transportation 
Administration process for environmental 
review, and the entire process will now be 
subject to a wasteful “Do Over.” 

In fact, the planners announced that 
bureaucratic change more than a month 
ago, and it refers to an outdated 2010 ver- 
sion of the plan, running from ABIA to 
Mueller (which these same opponents also 
denounced, because “Guadalupe/Lamar!”) 
If these “transit advocates” are determined 
to find ethical failings in the debate over 
Project Connect, they should start by look- 
ing in the mirror. 

There are certainly reasons to oppose 
this rail project. You prefer roads, you like 
buses, you don’t want to spend the money, 
or you indeed believe you know better 
than the folks who have been working pro- 
fessionally on this project for years. You’re 
convinced the route should run from 
Abbey Road to Strawberry Fields, and 
you’re certain to persuade the next City 
Council of your vision by 2016. 

That’s all fine. But the moral high 
ground is unavailable, and you don’t speak 
for “the people.” We’re arguing about 
what’s best for Austin transportation, the 
answers are complicated, and we’ve all got 
opinions. More importantly, we’re all in 
this together. ■ 


Preferential Treatment 

SCHWAB WINS INCENTIVES FROM COUNTY - WHEN DO WE SAY ‘TIME OUT? 




These are frustrating tinnes for the de 
facto county judge in waiting. Sarah Eck- 
hardt, who’s expected to win easily against 
her Republican opponent in November, is 
marking the days until January, when she 
officially takes the reins of the Travis 
County Commissioners Court. 

Until then, though, the votes are hopelessly 
stacked in favor of doing the opposite of what 
she would do on some of the pricklier 
issues that come before the 
county. Things like granting 
economic development 
incentives to companies 
wanting to expand or relo- 
cate here, for example. 

Eckhardt doesn’t believe 
corporate welfare is nec- 
essary during an unprec- 
edented economic boom, 
especially when Austin’s 
success has simultaneous- 
ly pushed more pressing 
issues like affordability, tax 
equity, and infrastructure (or lack 
thereof) into the spotlight. 

On Tuesday, Commissioners touched on 
those issues before voting 4-1 to grant $3.3 
million in tax rebates to Charles Schwab. 
The financial services firm, which currently 
employs about 1,000 people here, plans to 
add 823 jobs over the next 10 years at a 
new campus in North Austin. Things have 
gotten too expensive in San Francisco, so 
Schwab is downsizing there and upsizing in 
Colorado and Texas. 

Schwab had said that it would take its 
expansion plans to Denver if the Austin deal 
fell through - a threat Eckhardt called a 
“total bluff.” She didn’t voice her opposition 
in testimony Tuesday, but she said she did 
communicate her concerns to Travis County 
Judge Sam Biscoe and commissioners. 
“They know where I stand,” she said by tele- 
phone Wednesday morning. 

Indeed, what the current bunch knows is 
that the vote would have gone 3-2 against 
Schwab if Eckhardt and the next likely Pet. 2 
Commissioner, Brigid Shea, had been mak- 



f FHEIT^ 
THERE'S 


. THIS j 

^ BY AMY ^ 
^ SMITH . 




ing the decision. 
Commissioner Ron 
Davis cast the only dis- 
senting vote Tuesday, 
with Biscoe, Bruce Todd, 
Gerald Daugherty, and 
Margaret Gomez forming 
the majority. 

Davis, who sometimes has 
trouble turning his thoughts into 
sound arguments, made an impas- 
sioned plea on behalf of those who never 
reap the local benefits touted by the busi- 
ness-recruitment arm of the Greater Austin 
Chamber of Commerce. “I don’t know if 
some people understand how it is to be poor. 
We need to hold the line on rebates until 
we’re able to get some type of control of this 
situation,” he said, adding that he wasn’t 
sure how the final vote would stack up. “I do 
know this, that the taxpayers are over- 
whelmed ... I think they’re saying lime out.’” 
Daugherty and Gomez spent several min- 
utes wringing their hands before casting their 
votes; Biscoe, who’s getting more and more 
chipper as his retirement draws near, steered 
the meeting along with little comment. Todd, 
who’ll return to his lobby job at the end of 
the year, looked ready to personally roll out 
the welcome mat for Schwab. 

To be just a little fair, county officials didn’t 
have a lot of time to study the proposal, 
although they must have known it was in the 
Chamber’s pipeline. Gov. Rick Perry and his 
Texas Enterprise Fund crew took about 


three months to review the deal before throw- 
ing it to the county in July. (The city won’t be 
weighing in on the abatements, but it will like- 
ly be called on for any needed road and infra- 
structure improvements at the new campus.) 

Daugherty, the only Republican on the com- 
missioners court, signaled early on that he 
would vote for the agreement because 
Schwab met all the county’s incentive policy 
requirements. But he wanted the company 
and Chamber officials to know that it pained 
him to award the tax abatements to a “well- 
heeled” company when county residents 
were struggling just to pay their taxes. “I’ve 
made the comment before, maybe we ought 
to test this [incentives] thing. Maybe we 
ought to say To’ and find out whether some- 
body will really go to another town.” 

Noting the ongoing heartburn over home- 
owners’ rising property tax bills, he said he 
was heartened by Schwab’s statement that it 
didn’t intend to challenge its property tax bill 
(unless they believed an error had occurred). 
At the same time, Daugherty urged the Cham- 
ber to try to work on bridging the gap between 
the haves and the have-nots. “There is an 
image out there that the Chamber is only con- 
cerned about one thing, and that is putting as 
many companies here as you can get,” he 
said, adding one other request: “Try not to 
bring us things where in two weeks we’ve got 
to make something work, or else people are 
going to start jumping off of bridges and 
mountaintops.” Those kinds of threats, he 
said, “aren’t fair to the community.” 

Eckhardt, meanwhile, has had some time 
over the summer to draw up a to-do list. She 
says she intends to discuss the current state 
of affairs with Chamber officials. “They have 
other very valid concerns about the tax rate 
and the burden on residential homeowners, 
and the cost of doing business here,” she 
said. “And I think that it’s growing increasingly 
difficult to advocate those things simultane- 
ously [with incentive proposals] for a very 
small number. To extend preferential tax 
treatment to one member of a class and then 
have everyone else in that class paying full 
freight doesn’t make a whole lot of sense.” ■ 


CIVICS 101 For an up-to-date listing of upcoming candidate forums, see austinchronicle.com/elections. 


THURSDAY 07 SATURDAY 09 


TUESDAY 12 


ESL COURSE APPLICATION Learn more 
about ACC’s free ESL classes, and get 
help with the online application. Bring 
government-issued photo ID (not B or 
F visas). 5:30-8:30pm. Asian American 
Resource Center, 8401 Cameron. Free. 
www.austincc.edu/abe. 

FRIDAY 08 

TEXAS SALES TAX HOLIDAY Save on 
back-to-school shopping: Most clothing, 
footwear, school supplies, and back- 
packs priced under $100 are exempt 
from sales tax this weekend. Fri.-Sun. 
www.texastaxholiday.org. 


TCDP: DIVERSITY OUTREACH BLOCKWALK & MEETING 

Register voters and promote civic engagement. Please 
be sure to bring snacks, water bottles, sunscreen, and 
comfortable shoes. 10am-2pm. Coordinated Campaign HQ, 
1910 E. MLK. Free, www.traviscountydemocrats.org. 

‘AUSTIN REVEALED: CIVIL RIGHTS STORIES’ A special 
screening and discussion of a 30-minute documentary 
that explores the issues of racial segregation and the civil 
rights movement in Austin. 2pm. Austin History Center, 810 
Guadaiupe. Free, iibrary.austintexas.gov. 

TX NORML SENIOR ALLIANCE MEETING Help plan strat 
egy to motivate, educate, and legislate senior involvement. 
Speaker will be Noelle Davis. 2-4:30pm. Opai Divine’s 
Marina, 12709 MoPac N. Free, www.texasnormi.org. 


SOUTH AUSTIN DEMOCRATS MAYORAL FORUM 5:30-7pm. 
Ei Gaiio, 2910 S. Congress. Free, www.southaustindems.org. 

‘SOURCE OF INCOME’ PROTECTIONS The Community 
Development Commission will consider whether to recom- 
mend that Council add “source of income” protections to 
the city’s Housing Discrimination Ordinance in order to help 
those using vouchers. 6:30pm. Neighborhood Housing and 
Community Deveiopment Office, 1000 E. 11th. Free. 
austintexas.gOv/citycierk/boards_commissions/meetings/20_l.htm. 

WEDNESDAY 13 

AURA CITY COUNCIL DISTRICT 7 CANDIDATE FORUM 

A forum, sponsored by AURA and open to the public, moder- 
ated by AURA member Cory Brown, who will ask questions 
related to AURA’s platform for Austin. 7-8:45pm. Yarborough 
Library, 2200 Hancock. Free, www.aura-atx.org. 


12 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE AUGUSTS, 2014 austinchronicle.com 






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TCRP Sues Uber, Lyft, Yellow Cab 


On July 24, the Texas Civil Rights 
Project filed what have become its annual 
Americans With Disability Act lawsuits, 
presenting 30 different allegations that 
companies within the state have violated 
federal disability laws. Among the 30, the 
TCRP named Austin taxi giant Yellow 
Cab and transportation network compa- 
nies Uber and Lyft, the three companies 
most mentioned in the ongoing develop- 
ment of this city’s eventual transportation 
network ecosystem. (The network compa- 
nies’ services are informally called “ride- 
sharing,” but essentially they facilitate 
vehicles-for-hire.) 

All three lawsuits are similar; the ones 
filed against Uber and Lyft are virtually 
identical. In each case, the suits allege that 
the companies failed to serve wheelchair- 
bound customers. Uber and Lyft (the two 
San Francisco-based TNCs currently oper- 
ating in Austin without authorization) each 
sent rides to requestors within 15 minutes, 
but neither dispatched any automobiles 
configured for wheelchair access, and thus 
couldn’t provide services. (The drivers rec- 
ommended the rejected customers try a 
taxicab.) Yellow Cab Austin, the largest taxi 
company in the city by nearly 300 vehicles, 
couldn’t send one of its 28 licensed wheel- 
chair accessible vehicles to two different 
customers - allegedly not an usual occur- 
rence - and thus never bothered to show up. 

“Yellow Cab does have accessible cabs, 
but they’re not deployed in a way that pro- 
vides the maximum accessibility or equiva- 
lent accessibility as compared with able- 
bodied people,” explains TCRP attorney 
Joseph Berra. “They’ve just dropped the 
ball, basically. They haven’t done enough, 
and need to be doing more. That’s in con- 
trast to Uber and Lyft, who haven’t done 


anything to provide accessible cab service 
for my clients.” 

Each plaintiff seeks damages in excess of 
$300, though their claims function largely as 
representational. The filings also coincide 
with ongoing talks amongst a stakeholder 
group charged with recommending to City 
Council just how much it should consider 
such specific issues when it finalizes a ride- 
for-hire pilot program this winter. 

Uber and Lyft - each ada- 
mant about its presence as a 
“technology platform” rather 
than a vehicle fleet - haven’t 
made efforts to accessorize 
their vehicle-sharing base to 
meet civil rights standards - 
or at least won’t publicly 
address it. When questioned, 
both companies mentioned 
that their services have helped 
the disabled community, but 
neither would specify whether 
they were talking about blind 
riders (who are classified as o 
disabled but are generally ^ 
able to ride in standard vehi- “ 
cles) or ones confined to ^ 
wheelchairs. Instead, they ^ 
only offered that their apps 
are built, as Uber spokeswoman Lauren 
Altmin noted, to “expand access to trans- 
portation options for all.” 

Yellow Cab President Ed Kargbo was 
significantly more forthcoming, and 
acknowledged his company’s inability to 
sufficiently incentivize drivers to incur the 
increased expenses that come with operat- 
ing a wheelchair-accessible car. Currently, 
Yellow Cab maintains 28 such cabs - 6.5% 
of its fleet of 433 licensed taxis, in accor- 
dance with city ordinances. (Each Austin 


company is required by law to operate a 
specified amount of specially permitted, 
wheelchair-accessible vehicles.) Kargbo 
pointed to a recommendation Yellow Cab 
made to the Houston City Council for a 
requirement that all on-demand taxilike 
services maintain a minimum 10% of their 
fleets as wheelchair accessible. (Kargbo 
was quick to recall the past four years he’s 
spent trying to increase taxi fleets in 


Austin - “and then subsequently, yes, add- 
ing more wheelchair-accessible vehicles” 
through additional permits.) “One of the 
things that’s confusing to people is the 
lack of understanding that the drivers 
actually buy their cars,” says Kargbo. 
“That’s one of the common misunder- 
standings: that the service we provide to 
the small business owner/operators - the 
cab drivers - is the same service that Uber 
and Lyft are providing.” Albeit with very 
different regulations. 


Kargbo’s suggestion is that the stakehold- 
er group now meeting biweekly recommend 
to Council a program that supports “appro- 
priate regulation to the needs of the con- 
sumer” for both networking companies and 
locally operated taxi companies, whose con- 
tracts with the city are scheduled for revision 
in 2015. “The city needs to have regulations 
that meet the needs of the consumer,” says 
Kargbo. “That’s the role of policymakers. It’s 
not to say less,’ because people say they need 
less, or ‘more,’ because we just want to have 
more. It’s making sure that we have appro- 
priate rules in place that pro- 
tect the consumer from a safe- 
ty standpoint, from a price- 
gouging standpoint, from a 
discrimination standpoint.” 
Which is what makes these 
isolated instances so compel- 
ling. For able-bodied individ- 
uals equipped with credit 
cards and smartphones, com- 
panies like Uber and Lyft 
offer access to swift, personal- 
ized transportation that cab 
companies struggle to pro- 
vide; but the companies’ cur- 
rent business models (and 
lack of regulation) do not 
require their drivers to serve 
everybody - effectively 
excluding those without 
smartphones or credit cards, and a large 
segment of the disabled community. That 
puts the two companies on the wrong side 
of at least one state human resources code. 

“It’s still a transportation service,” 
TCRP’s Berra concludes. “It’s not just a 
nifty way to make money. You’re getting 
into a business that transports people. 
There are reasons why businesses should 
be open to all: social reasons that are part of 
our civil rights architecture. They’ve got to 
be aware of that.” - Chase Hoffberger 



Council: Come as You Are 

I’m tempted to cite the most important City Council mat- 
ter today, Aug. 7, as Agenda Item 111: “directing the City 
Manager to study the economic impact of the fashion indus- 
try in Austin and work with stakeholders and the Economic 
Development Department to develop recommendations for 
ways to support the local fashion industry” (co-sponsored by 
Mike Martinez and Laura Morrison). However, anyone who 
has even the slightest familiarity with the present writer will 
agree that he knows absolutely nothing of this subject - so I 
leave it to the Chronicle Style columnist, Amy Gentry, to deal 
with this matter elsewhere, as she handsomely will. 

Ergo, lurking on this voluminous official posting - a stag- 
gering 178 items in all - is the rather bland direction at Item 
17 that Council order a “general municipal election” to take 
place Nov. 4 and include selections for mayor and a Council 
of 10 districts, as well as a major transportation bond pro- 
posal (language to be determined) and a few neighboring 
jurisdictions on the side. Listed on consent, that item is 
unlikely to pass without some pontification on all sides. (See 
also “A Great Big Bundle of Rail and Roads,” p.24.) 

What else might Council get accomplished before dawn? 
Moving a cool $30 million from Austin Energy operations 
into reserves; a brace of the now-routine AE solar energy 
incentives, including $90,000 over 10 years for the new AISD 


Performing Arts Center at Mueller; authorizing acceptance 
of a $1 million federal grant to help underwrite a recycling/ 
remanufacturing project near ABIA (see “City Plans to ‘[re] 
Manufacture’ Landfill,” p.21). They might also approve a set- 
tlement (reportedly approaching $1.5 million or more) 
responding to last July’s APD-officer shooting of Larry Eugene 
Jackson Jr,; several items derived from the work of the 
Water Resource Planning Task Force (separately spon- 
sored by CMs Kathie Tovo and Chris Riley, rivals for the 
incoming District 9 seat); two items addressing the needs of 
Central American refugees and possible city ID cards for 
undocumented immigrants; and another that would address 
“distracted driving” (stash those phones!). 

And nearly three dozen zoning cases, among them the 
Commodore Perry Estate at 41st & Red River, and a pro- 
posed 32-story Downtown hotel project (see “Another Hotel 
Checks In on Congress Avenue,” Aug. 1). Also, a case involv- 
ing the proposed Overlook office project at Spicewood 
Springs has drawn strong opposition from neighbors, who cite 
a combination of concerns: increased traffic on the two-lane 
stretch of Spicewood Springs between MoPac and Loop 360, 
the proposed height of the office project (three stories), and 
environmental concerns - they say the site is home to critical 
environmental features, including canyon rim rock and wet- 
lands. Residents are especially concerned that the project 
could produce the same “eyesore” as the nearby (currently 
under construction) Austin Board of Realtors’ new HQ. 


Those are just a few highlights in what threatens to be 
another marathon meeting, yet somewhat overshadowed by 
ongoing annual budget deliberations. The staff-proposed big 
numbers came in last week: 

• The All Funds budget (includes “enterprise” [income-gener- 
ating] departments): $3.5 billion 

• General Fund budget (operating/ expense budget): $850.6 
million (2014: $800 million) 

• Civilian employees pay increase: 3.5% ($19.5 million) 

• Police and firefighter pay increase: 1% ($3.4 million, 
pending firefighter contract) 

• Increase in city contribution to health insurance: 8% 
($10.7 million) 

• New positions (net): 151 (59 police officers; 38 civilian 
APD; 17 ABIA; 8 HHS [fee-funded]) 

• Property tax rate (proposed): 48.09 cents/$100 evalu- 
ation (2014: 50.27) 

• “Typical” tax/fee increases (on a median-value home, 
$196,500): $12.13/month (3.9%) 

There’s already been Council pushback on that last num- 
ber, largely aimed at the $4. 67/month AE increase - and AE 
staff is reportedly scrambling to adjust downward. Beyond 
that, the campaign debate over a “homestead exemption” 
on property taxes has begun, with proponents saying it’s nec- 
essary for “affordability,” and opponents saying it’s regres- 
sive, demanding, “Show us how you’re going to pay for the 
$36 million it will cost.” - Michael King and Amy Smith 


14 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE AUGUSTS, 2014 austinchronicle.com 



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austinchronicle.com AUGUST 8, 2014 the Austin chronicle 15 






S-Comm Troubles: Not Just 


The Secure Communities program - gen- 
erally perceived as aimed primarily at 
Hispanic immigrants - is casting a much 
wider net. The federal initiative adopted by 
the Travis County Sheriffs Office, which 
effectively aids immigration officials with 
deportations, is also capturing an increas- 
ing number of Asian immigrants - more 
often than not, legal residents - in its drag- 
net. Austin Asian leaders hosted a forum 
last weekend to educate the population on 
the controversial program. “We’re kind of 
underground, out of sight and out of mind,” 
attorney Richard Jung said during a recent 
interview. “I don’t want to 
turn this into an Asian com- 
munity piece, but S-Comm is 
emblematic of all the other 
problems the Asian commu- 
nity faces.” 

Jung said he is increasingly 
getting desperate calls at odd 
hours from clients arrested 
for minor infractions - misde- 
meanors normally handled by 
a magistrate, instead trigger- 
ing a 48-hour hold, per 
S-Comm protocol, to give U.S. 

Immigration and Customs Enforcement 
time to determine residency status. Jung 
knows what documentation to provide to 
secure release from the 48-hour ICE hold - 
he recently used it to spring four of his cli- 
ents from detention. “If a client calls me in 
the middle of the night and I see an ICE 
detainer, I know what to do,” he said. “But 
you have criminal attorneys who don’t 
know there’s a problem.” 

While many jurisdictions have opted out 
of S-Comm because of constitutional ques- 


tions, Travis County has become an aggres- 
sive practitioner. Since 2009 (one year after 
the program’s launch), nearly 5,000 county 
residents have been deported, according to 
the Austin Immigrant Rights Coalition. 

Under S-Comm, fingerprints of those 
arrested for even minor infractions are 
shared not only with the FBI (as has long 
been the practice), but with ICE, to deter- 
mine a person’s immigration status. And 
people who might otherwise be released are 
jailed while ICE makes its determination, 
for up to 48 hours - or more, if that falls over 
weekends or holidays. While most of the 
attention has been on the 
impact to the Hispanic popu- 
lation, the program is also 
having an effect on other 
minority groups, Jung said. 
“We’re also trying to draw in 
the African immigrant com- 
munity to make them more 
visible on this issue so that 
people become more aware.” 
Under S-Comm, ICE detain- 
ers are also being placed on 
members of the growing 
African population - people 
from the Congo, West Africa, Ghana, and 
Ivory Coast. “If you’re arrested for ‘driving 
while black’ and you happen to be an 
African immigrant,” Jung said, “then ICE is 
going to put a detainer on you as well, for 
the same exact set of scenarios for a Latino.” 
The local chapter of South Asian Ameri- 
cans Leading Together hosted an S-Comm 
forum Saturday, Aug. 2, at the Asian Ameri- 
can Resource Center. Ranjana Natarajan, 
director of the civil rights clinic at the 
UT- Austin Law School, said she found many 


for Latinos! 

residents don’t understand the potentially 
life-changing effect of an arrest prompted 
by S-Comm. “For example,” she said, “that 
people who end up never being charged 
with a crime may nevertheless be deported, 
or that the vast majority of people being 
deported through S-Comm committed or 
were accused of nonviolent offenses.” 

“Folks who attended the meeting,” she 
continued, “were interested in learning 
more, and asked the burning question of 
why the Travis County Sheriff [Greg Hamil- 
ton] wants to continue this program when it 
is voluntary, costly, and raises constitu- 
tional problems.” According to census data, 
since 2000, Austin’s Asian population has 
grown 57%; while Asians currently repre- 
sent only 6% of the local population, the 
growing numbers suggest greater exposure 
to S-Comm enforcement. 

The sheriffs office recently revised its 
website to include more information about 
S-Comm, including “Frequently Asked 
Questions” addressing specific issues 
raised in a recent Chronicle story (“Cold as 
ICE,” July 4). Not yet posted is a long-prom- 
ised list of those placed on ICE detainers 
reflecting not just undocumented felons 
ensnared by S-Comm, but those marked for 
deportation as a result of misdemeanor 
charges. Research by the AIRC reflects that 
nearly 75% of detainers issued in the last 
two years were for people who had never 
been convicted of any crime. 

Sheriffs Office spokesman Roger Wade 
said posting the list is taking longer than 
expected due to a software problem, but 
that the revamped list would also include 
racial or ethnic data. “It is taking longer 
than anticipated but we will have the infor- 


mation up as soon as possible,” Wade wrote 
via email. “The expanded daily list will be 
added to the website as soon as possible. ... 
Every person with an ICE detainer will be 
identified the day the detainer is placed no 
matter what the level of their charge.” 

Immigrant rights advocates don’t dispute 
the need to expel undocumented felons, but 
object to the indiscriminate use of S-Comm 
to trigger deportation proceedings among 
even nonviolent offenders, and the 48-hour 
hold for even minor charges. Jung says the 
focus of deportation should be on the genu- 
inely criminal element, and a county magis- 
trate should be allowed to handle the rest, 
under standard procedures. 

Until that happens, Jung expects to have 
to bail out more of his clients. Consider 
someone arrested on suspicion of a DWI 
charge, Jung says, whose fingerprints are 
shared with immigration officials. “ICE 
only knows two things at this point: the 
person’s name based on whatever identifi- 
cation they have, and that they’ve been 
arrested on suspicion of DWI. ... What war- 
rants them to issue a detainer when the 
judge otherwise would say they can be 
released, but ICE says no, we want to hold 
them for two days? On what basis can they 
do that? 

“They don’t know if they’re undocument- 
ed or not. They may have a suspicion, but 
they haven’t gone and checked their records 
and confirmed it. How do we know they 
haven’t done that? Because they’re issuing 
detainers for people with visas!” 

Jung believes S-Comm requires galva- 
nized community reaction. “All the immi- 
grant communities have to coalesce on this, 
as well as the nonimmigrant members of 
the community who just think this is 
wrong.” - Tony Cantu 



APD Cracks Down on Spillway Swimmers and Dogs 


When David Thornberry arrived at the Barton Springs 
spillway with his two dogs, Ranger and Skip-Bo, on Friday, 
Aug. 1, he was surprised to find that no one was in the water. 
Thornberry has been coming to the spillway with his dogs for 
about 15 years. He, like many other visitors, enjoys the cold, 
clear moving water. 

Unfortunately for Thornberry and his dogs, last week APD 
began enforcing a ban on swimming and off-leash dogs at the 
spillway, after years of turning a blind eye. 

The crackdown comes in response to a dramatic spike in 
crime, says APD Lt. Art Fortune: Twenty-three thefts and bur- 
glaries took place in the Zilker Park area between July 1 and 
Aug. 2, and many of the items taken were phones and wallets 
left either in cars or on the shore of the spillway while their 
owners were swimming. Police have told would-be swimmers 
that they plan to continue enforcing the ban for at least the 
next three months. Fortune understands the frustration of long- 
time spillway users. He says APD’s purpose is to educate, not 
to issue citations - although they will cite repeat offenders and 
others who refuse to comply. While APD has received a num- 
ber of complaints about off-leash dogs. Fortune doesn’t believe 
that it’s swimmers - including dogs swimming on leashes - 
that are causing the problem, and says he knows it can be a 
big surprise to see the ban being enforced, seemingly out of 
nowhere. But an increase in the number of visitors to the area 
- combined with PARD’s decision to allow alcohol at the spill- 


way - has created an opportunity that some thieves find irre- 
sistible. While people may believe they’re protecting them- 
selves by stashing their valuables out of sight. Fortune cau- 
tions that criminals will watch the area, waiting for people to 
leave their belongings unattended. 

In response to complaints about the sudden enforcement, 
the city announced on Wednesday that it will begin a public 
education campaign about the regulations on swimming and 
dogs, and ban alcohol at the spillway beginning Sept. 2. 

PARD will also be working with policymakers such as Council 
members Mike Martinez and Chris Riley on a solution that 
allows people to continue to swim in the spillway with their 
dogs. After all, dogs aren’t allowed in Barton Springs proper. “If 
you can’t cool off in Barton Springs with your dog or your fami- 
ly, then what kind of place are we becoming?” Martinez asks. 
Martinez and Riley are considering either proposing amending 
the ordinance currently banning off-leash dogs and swimming 
at the spillway, or to ask that APD not enforce the ban. He 
says he had hoped to add an item to this week’s agenda, but 
staff requested a few weeks to study the spillway’s water quali- 
ty. One concern is the potential environmental impact of having 
so many dogs in a small area of water. Fortune recalls Bull 
Creek’s past problems with high pathogen levels, and notes 
that APD has received several complaints about dog feces at 
the spillway, which is in a more densely trafficked area than 
Bull Creek. Longtime environmental advocate and dog owner 



A ban on too much fun 


Robert Corbin believes that dogs have no place at the spill- 
way: “Dog owners love their dogs, but they don’t always love 
picking up dog poop.” Corbin worries that even dogs on leash- 
es will contribute to a “general degradation of the area,” con- 
sidering that the number of visitors continues to increase 
every summer. He points out that not everyone enjoys the 
advances of even the best-intentioned dog, and that children 
and dogs don’t always mix well. 

Regardless of the eventual outcome, the resources needed 
to enforce the ban can only be stretched so far. 

Around 4pm on Sunday, Aug. 3, many visitors were blissful- 
ly unaware of the controversy: The spillway was filled with 
families, canoes, bathing-suited swimmers, and dogs on and 
off their leashes. - Amy Kamp 


16 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE AUGUST 8, 2014 austinchronicle.com 





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austinchronicle.com AUGUST 8, 2014 the Austin chronicle 17 









‘We Won’t Back Down’: HB 2 on Trial 


In day two of the trial to block provisions 
of Texas’ abortion-restrictive House Bill 2, a 
local reproductive health care provider 
recounted the increased state regulator vis- 
its following her involvement with the first 
lawsuit against HB 2, filed in 2013. Amy Hag- 
strom Miller, founder and CEO of Whole 
Woman’s Health, testified Tuesday that 
before her network of health clinics filed suit 
last year, clinic deficiencies reported by the 
state were rare. But after filing the suit, the 
clinics felt a “very significant” change in 
tone from the Department of State Health 
Services, which began to aggressively make 
more visits. Miller said that after her legal 
complaint to the state, the relationship with 
DSHS felt “adversarial,” and she and her 
staff grew “uncomfortable.” 

Miller also detailed the difficulty of leas- 
ing or purchasing an ambulatory surgical 
center due to high cost and uncooperative 
financiers, while efforts to lease a space 
close to Seton Medical Center in Austin, 
failed due to a clause in the lease barring 
abortions from being performed on the site. 
Miller’s Austin abortion and preventative 
health care center closed its doors last week 
after more than a decade in service; two 
more of her clinics also closed earlier this 
year as a result of HB 2. 

The court also heard from Marilyn Eld- 
ridge, president of the now-closed Repro- 
ductive Services of El Paso. After more 
than four decades serving women, the cen- 
ter was forced to close as a result of HB 2’s 
hospital admitting privileges requirement, 
which mandates doctors acquire admitting 
privileges at a hospital within 30 miles of 
where any abortion is performed. 

The trial began Monday morning in U.S. 
District Judge Lee Yeakel’s Austin court- 
room. Abortion providers and a string of 



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expert witnesses detailed the health and 
safety risks the law would impose on Texas 
women, while the state argued the legisla- 
tion is intended to increase the level of care 
and patient oversight. 

Abortion providers aim to block both the 
admitting-privileges requirement, and a pro- 
vision that forces abortion clinics to comply 
with the same standards as ambulatory surgi- 
cal centers - an action which is expected to 
close at least 14 clinics, reducing the total 
number of remaining abortion care centers in 
the state to fewer than 10. Only 22% of abor- 
tions are performed at ASCs, and most clinics 
cannot meet the requirements due to exorbi- 
tant costs, said attorneys representing abor- 
tion providers. For instance, each clinic would 
need to pay up to an estimated $3 million in 


construction costs to comply, and between 
$600,000 and $1 million in annual operating 
costs for facility changes, a building architect 
testified - changes considered by health pro- 
fessionals as wholly medically unnecessary. 

Dr. Lendol Davis of the Killeen Women’s 
Health Center said his facility had to close 
because it could not meet the expensive 
ASC requirement. “These costs are not only 
enormous, but they provide no benefit to 
women seeking abortion services in Texas,” 
said Jan Soifer, an attorney representing 
providers. Following full implementation, 
abortion care is expected to be limited to 
San Antonio, Dallas, Fort Worth, Austin, 
and Houston after September. 

More than 891,000 women would live far- 
ther than 150 miles from an abortion clinic 


if the law does take effect, health leaders 
argued. This, in turn, will likely lead to an 
increase in abortion procedure delays - 
which heightens risk and complications for 
women - including unplanned births, pos- 
sible self-induction, and use of “black mar- 
ket” abortion pharmaceutical drugs. 

Health leaders and plaintiffs argue the 
hospital-privileges rule isn’t needed, as 
instances of complication are rare and seldom 
require hospitalization. (In the past 10 years, 
only two patients of the 14,000 served at the 
McAllen abortion clinic required transfer 
from the clinic to a hospital.) The American 
Medical Association, the American College 
of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the 
American College of Surgeons, and other 
major health groups agree that privileges 
aren’t necessary for outpatient procedures. 

The attorney general’s office maintains 
the law reduces the likelihood of complica- 
tion and improves patient care. And Deputy 
AG Jimmy Blacklock argued that the driv- 
ing distance does not pose a “substantial 
obstacle.” Pointing to the closed El Paso 
clinic, the state’s attorneys argued that 
women seeking abortion would have “no 
trouble at all” obtaining the procedure in 
neighboring New Mexico, 10-15 miles away. 

Outside the federal courthouse, both 
reproductive rights and anti-choice activ- 
ists gathered to protest. “We’re here to show 
our support for providers and be a visible 
presence to demonstrate that Texans are 
fighting back, that we care about what hap- 
pens to people when they can’t access abor- 
tion, and to show that we won’t back down,” 
said NARAL Pro-Choice Texas Executive 
Director Heather Busby. The trial is expect- 
ed to continue throughout the week. 

- Mary Tuma 

Testimony in the federal trial challenging HB 
2 is expected to conclude Thursday or Friday, 
August 7 or 8. Mary Tuma has been filing reports 
daily on the Newsdesk at austinchronicle.com. 



More than a thousand protesters 
march through Downtown Austin on 
Aug. 2 as part of the Texas Stands 
With Gaza campaign. 


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The 10-1 Ticker... 

Attorney Steve Adler formally filed his ballot application Monday 
afternoon, making three filed mayoral candidates (Mike Martinez, 

Ron Culver) and five more waiting in the wings... Yet another would-be 
mayor, Stephen Fabian, filed a campaign treasurer designation 
Tuesday... As of Tuesday afternoon, Aug. 5, 23 candidates had filed 
ballot applications for mayor or City Council, and overall, more than 70 
potential candidates had filed CTDs... Deadline for ballot applica- 
tions is Monday, Aug. 18... Also this week, Adler announced he supports a 
20% homestead property tax exemption for Austin homeowners, 
phased in over four years... His main rivals, incumbents Sheryl Cole 
and Mike Martinez, said the exemption would cost $36 million and 
Adler should explain how he intends to pay for it, either with a tax increase 
or specified budget cuts... In District 3, Julian Limon Fernandez was 
noting that rival campaigns were apparently tearing down his campaign 
signs, and distributed a video on Facebook recording somebody in the 
act... District 10 candidate Tina Cannon called for an operational and 
financial audit of the Austin Water utility... Council will officially order 
the Nov. 4 election this week, to include as well a proposed transporta- 
tion bond package... 

Early endorsements began: The Network of Austin Asian 
Organizations endorsed Adler for mayor, Fred McGhee in District 3, 
Greg Casar in 4, Ann Kitchen in 5, Eliza May in 8, Kathie Tovo in 9, and 
Mandy Dealey in 10... The Austin Police Association PAC 
endorsed Ora Houston in District 1, Delia Garza in District 2, Katrina 
Daniel in 4, and Robert Thomas in 10... Capital Tejano Democrats 
endorsed Mike Martinez for mayor, Delia Garza in District 2. 


18 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE AUGUSTS , 2014 austinchronicle.com 











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Davis Bops Abbott’s 
Insider Deals 


Secretive corporations. Gouging insur- 
ance companies. Dangerous doctors. Accord- 
ing to Sen. Wendy Davis, her opponent for 
the governor’s mansion, Attorney General 
Greg Abbott, has been using his office to 
protect all those groups, and his campaign 
has been pocketing some pretty impressive 
campaign contributions in return. At an 
Aug. 5 press event in Austin, Davis went 
full bore after her rival, dubbing him “an 
insider who is not working for you.” 

The key to a good campaign is telling a 
good story, and on that front Davis’ cam- 
paign had been floundering for months. 
Smeared as “Abortion Barbie” by the right, 
efforts to refocus the narrative on educa- 
tion went nowhere, and it began to appear 
that Abbott should just start picking out 
curtains for the governor’s mansion. But in 
the last few weeks - notably ever since 
Rep. Chris Turner, D-Fort Worth, took 
over as campaign manager - Davis has 
found new traction with a full-frontal 
assault on Abbott’s ethics. “It seems like 
every few weeks,” she said, “we hear of 
another instance where he’s siding with 


insiders when he knows it will hurt hard- 
working Texans.” 

The first accusation relates to a legal opin- 
ion. In the wake of the West chemical plant 
explosion, Abbott stated that local govern- 
ment and state agencies were not obligated 
to release records of whatever dangerous, 
toxic, or explosive chemicals were being 
stored by private companies. Technically, 
under state law and Homeland Security 
regulations, Abbott’s ruling was correct. But 
he disappeared in a PR quagmire when he 
clarified that residents could simply ask 
their friendly neighborhood chemical com- 
pany what was in those unmarked barrels. 
How would Texans even know which com- 
panies to ask? “You know where they are if 
you drive around,” he replied. 

Democratic groups responded via 
YouTube, with residents recording exactly 
what happened when they tried to follow 
Abbott’s advice (the quick answer is that 
they were generally shown the door). For 
the Davis campaign, it was the first real 
crack in Abbott’s armor, as they launched 
the “Texans Deserve to Know” tour. 


The narrative tightened on Abbott with a 
May ruling by District Judge Scott Jenkins, 
who excoriated the AG over a deal with 
Farmers Insurance over massive price 
hikes, in a lawsuit that’s been going on 
since 2003. Jenkins rejected the latest deal 
struck by Abbott and Farmers, calling it 
“deferential” and telling Deputy Attorney 
General David Mattax, “You don’t just 
have to lay down to Farmers.” (That’s not 
the only legal slap Abbott has taken recent- 
ly: On June 17, the 5th Court of Appeals 
allowed former Assistant Attorney General 
Ginger Weatherspoon to move forward 
^ with her whistleblower lawsuit, alleging her 
o bosses tried to coerce her into lying under 
oath. Abbott’s office has now asked the 
Texas Supreme Court to dismiss her suit, 
claiming she didn’t follow all the necessary 
rules to claim whistleblower protections.) 

The most recent addition to the accusa- 
tion pile reads more like a true-crime story 
than political fodder. Call it the case of the 
sociopathic surgeon. In a little under three 
years, actions by neurosurgeon Dr. Christo- 
pher Duntsch led to the deaths of two peo- 
ple and the permanent crippling of four 
others - all in what were supposed to be 
minimally invasive procedures. This should 
have nothing to do with Abbott, but in 2013 
his office intervened in a lawsuit against the 
Baylor Regional Medical Center of Plano, 
at which Duntsch practiced. The families of 
Duntsch’s victims claim that Baylor willful- 
ly ignored complaints against Duntsch, 
even while his own colleagues were alleging 
incompetence and drug use. (One even com- 
pared him to Hannibal Lecter.) “The hospi- 
tal knew about the surgeon’s history,” Davis 
claims, “but allowed him to keep operating 
anyway.” Abbott intervened in order to 
defend the constitutionality of a tort reform 
law, which would limit the amount of dam- 
ages the plaintiffs could receive. 

What’s the unifying factor in all these 
allegations? That Abbott accepted big cam- 
paign donations from each of these entities. 
Dangerous chemicals? Try $50,000 from 
Charles and David Koch, plus another 
$25,000 from Chase Koch, son of Charles. 
Insurance? $75,000 from the Farmers 
Employee PAC. Medical malpractice? 
$350,000 from Drayton McLane, chair of 
Baylor Scott & White Health, owners of the 
Baylor Center. Add on to that another half a 
million from firms that received big con- 
tracts from the controversial Cancer Preven- 
tion Research Institute of Texas, on whose 
board Abbott sits. 

Abbott’s campaign has tried to debunk 
the connections, with spokesman Matt 
Hirsch claiming his boss “has been able to 
retain the independence that allows him to 
investigate and even prosecute companies 
that gave him political contributions, show- 
ing that he is committed first to upholding 
the laws of the state of Texas.” But Davis 
says there’s a real difference between her- 
self and “so-called leaders in this state who 
have sold their interests out in favor of their 
own.” She added, “Voters in this state need 
to know that there is a candidate for gover- 
nor who is going to stand for them and fight 
for them.” - Richard Whittaker 




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4 


city Plans “[re]Manufacture” for Landfill 


One person’s trash is another’s treasure. 
With its new “eco-industrial park” south of 
the airport, Austin plans to apply that adage 
on a very large scale. 

The businesses it plans to locate on 107 
acres adjacent to the closed municipal land- 
fill will turn recyclable materials into new 
products and bring manufacturing jobs to a 
disadvantaged area. At today’s City Council 
meeting (Aug. 7), the city is expected to for- 
mally accept a $1 million grant for the project 
from the U.S. Economic Development 
Administration. 

Right now, says 
Austin Resource 
Recovery Director Bob 
Gedert, most recyclable 
materials collected in 
Austin are sent overseas 
for “remanufacture.” City 
trucks haul the contents 
of the blue curbside bins 
to two local companies 
that sort paper from 
plastic, and then those 
companies bale the 
materials and ship them 
to manufacturers that 
turn them into new prod- 
ucts (a park bench made 
from water bottles, for 
example). Gedert says 
changes to international 
shipping regulations in 
the late Eighties made it more cost effective 
to send materials overseas, but the result 
was the evaporation of domestic markets. 

The eco-industrial park, to be called the 
Austin [reJManufacturing Hub, is an 
attempt to reverse that trend. The business- 
es sited on its roughly 12 lots could be 
involved in recycling (of paper and wood 
fibers), reuse (such as electronics repair), or 
upcycling (most commonly associated with 
art). With these companies located in Austin, 
Gedert says, the city would reduce the car- 
bon footprint of recycling and divert more 
material from landfills. The latter accomplish- 
ment would create jobs while moving Austin 
closer to its zero-waste goals. Gedert’s exam- 
ple of a company that would support that tri- 


ple bottom line is a manufacturer turning 
recyclables into reusable grocery bags. 

The land designated for the Hub lies along 
FM 812, midway between McKinney Falls 
State Park and the Circuit of the Americas. It 
abuts the city’s landfill and was originally des- 
tined to become part of it, but FAA regulations 
required the eventual closure of the landfill, 
beginning in 1999, when the airport moved to 
its current location at the former Bergstrom 
Air Force Base. Landfills attract scavenging 
birds, a hazard for airplanes. (The city’s resi- 
dential trash is now taken 
to a private landfill oper- 
ated by Texas Disposal 
Systems, located near 
the southern tip of 
Travis County.) 

The designated land, 
currently in Austin’s extra- 
territorial jurisdiction, will 
be considered for annexa- 
tion in December. The city 
will begin vetting prospec- 
tive tenants later this 
year, and plans to start 
construction on infra- 
structure, like water and 
wastewater lines, in early 
2015. Companies will 
break ground next fall. 

In addition to the fed- 
eral grant, the city will 
invest between $8.5 mil- 
lion and $10 million in infrastructure develop- 
ment. While the details are still being worked 
out, planners expect to recoup the invest- 
ment via income from leases in a couple of 
decades. The park will support up to 1,250 
jobs, says Recycling Economic Development 
Liaison Natalie Betts, who works for both 
the Economic Development Department and 
Resource Recovery. Most will be in manufac- 
turing - a good fit, Betts says, for the seg- 
ment of Austin’s population without advanced 
degrees or with barriers to employment like 
previous incarceration. “Our statistics on 
income inequality are not good in Austin,” 
she said. “We think this could be a real cata- 
lyst and provide an employment center for 
this part of town.” - Robyn Ross 



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ttSidewalkfail 

We asked, and you sent. Thanks to all the people who have sent us pictures for our sidewalk 
fail gallery, including Josh Margolis, who knows a lot about Austin’s walkability. He’s a profession- 
al pet walker/sitter, and he sent us this photo of Waller Street in East Austin. At the south end, 
the sidewalk is barricaded by poles for power lines. Go north, he wrote, and “the sidewalk 
doesn’t have poles, but is even smaller and then plants and trees get in the way.” We think he’s 
generous for even calling that a sidewalk. 

Got your own neighborhood nightmare? Send your photos to sidewalkfail@austinchronicle.com, 
or tag Austin Chronicle on Facebook, or use the hashtag #sidewalkfail on Twitter. The best/worst - 
along with an interactive map - are posted at austinchronicle.com/photos/sidewalk-disasters. 


THE HIGHTOWER REPORT 


M 


OWER 


PERRY GOES FROM CALLOUS TO DISGUSTING 


Great news for you lovers of Wild West, 
shoot-’enn-up, pulp-fiction tales: Rick “Rootie- 
Toot-Toot” Perry is making a one-man stand 
on the Texas-Mexico border! 

A political stand, that is. He’s been tongue- 
lashing Obama for not doing enough to seal 
the border by dispatching a human line of 
armed National Guard troops to protect 
America from ... well, from what? Children, 
that’s what. Nearly 60,000 
terrorized, impoverished, 
and traumatized little ones 
have fled their hellish exis- 
tences in Central America 
- where rape, murder, con- 
scription into drug cartels, 
and hopeless poverty is 
their future - trekking all the way to the U.S. 
for a chance at something better. 

No way, shouts Sheriff Perry. This guy rou- 
tinely flaunts his Christianity for political pur- 
poses, but he seems to have forgotten that 
Jesus said: “Let the little children come to 
me, and do not hinder them.” Instead, the 
presidential wannabe bellows for their imme- 


diate deportation, claiming they’ll commit 
crimes, bring diseases, and burden taxpayers 
with welfare costs. 

Burden taxpayers? Perry’s “Grand Stand on 
the Border” will cost taxpayers about $12 
million a month to cover the state police 
and 1,000 National Guard troops he has 
deployed to the border. It’s a political stunt 
cynically exploiting children trying to escape 
unspeakable violence and 
poverty. But it’s not his 
money, so what the hell? 

It is, however, his moral- 
ity. He’s so morally stunt- 
ed that he’s willing to mili- 
tarize a humanitarian cri- 
sis and summarily send 
children back to their deaths. But it’s not 
their future that concerns Perry. Rather, this 
whole show is about his own political future, 
for he’s playing to the fear and loathing of 
Tea Party extremists who’ll dominate the 
upcoming Republican presidential primaries. 

Perry is not just callously ambitious, 
he’s disgusting. 


For more information on Jim Hightower’s 
work - and to subscribe to his award- 
winning monthly newsletter, “The 
Hightower Lowdown” - visit www.jim 
hightower.com. You can hear his radio 
commentaries on KOOP Radio 91.7FM, 
weekdays at 10:58am and 12:58pm. 


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austinchronicle.com AUGUST 8, 2014 the Austin chronicle 23 













The bond package, based on the SMP, would (over its term) 
cost an estimated $1 billion, with $400 million for road 
improvements and $600 million for urban rail. 


by state law - including various advocacy 
groups currently organizing and raising 
money, as well as policymakers such as 
Mayor Lee Leffingwell, who has made this 
^ project the final priority of his tenure - have 
I begun beefing up their promotional efforts. 
> Similarly, opponents ranging from rail-rejec- 
° tionists, to property tax-cutters, to transit 
w advocates who disapprove of this particular 
z routing, will be advocating accordingly. 


than 90,000 people working within a half- 
mile of the route. The proposal is expected to 
have almost 90,000 people living within a 
half-mile of the route and more than 132,000 
people working within that same area by 
2030, with an estimated average daily rider- 
ship of 18,000 in the same year.” 

The Project Connect team has also esti- 
mated that the $1.38 billion capital invest- 
ment - with local construction and profes- 


sional services earning $880 million - 
would result in an economic impact of 
$1.6-2. 4 billion, and 27,000-33,000 direct 
and indirect jobs. (Less conservative 
industry models, planners added, calcu- 
late more than $3.6 billion in 
economic impact.) More broad- 
ly, the planners estimate that 
subsequent economic devel- 
opment could mean an addi- 
tional $31.6-44.4 million in property 
tax revenue, $5.9-10.8 million in sales 
taxes, and $6.3-9. 1 billion in new 
building value. 

Some opponents have argued that the 
expense of rail will inevitably force a 
reduction in bus service. Cap Metro 
Communications Specialist John Julitz 
replied in an email, “There are no plans to 
reduce bus or any other transit service in 
order to fund the operation of this first urban 
rail line.” And in the longer term, he said, 
both the Project Connect: North Corridor 
plan and the Capital Metro Service 2025 
plan “caU for increased bus service.” 

Considering that Austin continues to 
be one of the fastest-growing metro areas 
in the country, supporters have empha- 
sized the importance of viewing the pro- 
posal in its larger context. While we’ve 
used the term “Project Connect” to refer 
specifically to the Central Corridor urban 
rail project, the entire Project Connect plan 
actually addresses the Central Texas region 
as a whole. Julitz says the proposal should 
be seen in this wider context - not as the 
only investment in urban rail, but simply 
the first investment in urban rail. It “will 
bring new riders to the entire system, and 
at the same time provide additional choices 
for people looking for options.” 


Bundling Up for Decongestion 

Leffingwell acknowledged that increased 
taxes are never popular, but believes the 
investment will be worth it - even for those 
who don’t plan to use rail directly. In 2014, 
Austin was named the fourth most con- 
gested metropolitan area in the U.S., 
according to Inrix, a national transportation 
research firm. Most Austinites are intimate- 
ly aware of the congestion problems, the 
mayor said, and, if nothing is done, that 
congestion will only get worse, leaving the 
city to deal with “the current trend project- 
ed indefinitely into the future - growing 
congestion and declining quality of life.” 

Similarly, Martinez commented, “The 
congestion and transportation issues that 
we have in Austin didn’t happen overnight, 
and they’re not going to go away overnight. 
We have to have a multimodal approach to 
deal with all of these issues.” In that con- 
text, Martinez emphasized the importance 
of including road investments in the pro- 
posal as well. 

There have been early complaints - from 
road supporters and rail supporters - that 
this “bundling” is inherently unfair, although 
virtually every bond package on the ballot 
exhibits some version of bundling, to broad- 
en the potential appeal. And as we reported 


continued on p.26 


A Great Big Bundle of 
Rail and Roads 


Council moves transportation bonds 
toward a November vote 


The train is about to leave the station, 
and the rubber is meeting the road. 

At its meeting today (Thursday, Aug. 7), 
City Council is expected to discuss, and 
likely vote to approve, a transportation 
bond package, with specific bond language 
for the Nov. 4 ballot. Barring surprises, the 
proposal will likely track the Strategic 
Mobility Plan (SMP) that Council unani- 
mously endorsed on June 26 (see “Council 
on Transportation: Pondering the Bond,” 
Aug. 1). 

The bond package, based on the SMP, 
would (over its term) cost an estimated $1 
billion, with $400 million for road improve- 
ments and $600 million for urban rail. The 
$600 million would cover a little less than 
half of Project Connect’s $1.38 billion 
Central Corridor Urban Rail project (aka the 
“Locally Preferred Alternative”). Ideally, 
the Federal Transportation Administration 
is expected to match the city’s funding for 
the project. Council Member Mike Martinez 
told the Chronicle last week that the official 
ballot language is expected to be condition- 
al, so as to “preclude the City Council from 
spending any funds on urban rail until 
we’ve received a federal match ... on the 
project” - a match that wouldn’t be con- 
firmed until 2017 or 2018, though the road 
projects could be started regardless. 


In June, following the Central Corridor 
Advisory Group’s adoption of the plan, the 
Capital Metro Board endorsed the urban 
rail recommendation. Additionally, accord- 
ing to its press release, the Cap Metro board 
“opted to include language to include plan- 
ning for a possible future extension to 
Austin-Bergstrom International Airport in 
the next phase of urban rail planning,” 
along with the already noted possible future 
extensions in the East Austin, Mueller, and 
Lamar “subcorridors” (the latter a particu- 
larly contentious element). 

In support of the proposal. Cap Metro 
press releases have noted the anticipated 
population growth around the urban rail 
route, which “currently has more than 46,000 
people living within a half-mile, and more 


Project Connect’s LPA, as 
endorsed by Council and 
the Capital Metro board of 
directors, would run a total 
of 9.5 miles, from 
Riverside/Grove on East 
Riverside, across a proposed 
new bridge over Lady Bird Lake, 
up Trinity Street in Downtown, 
through the UT-Austin campus 
via San Jacinto Boulevard, up Red 
River to the Hancock Center, and 
through a tunnel at Hancock before 
following Airport Boulevard to ACC 
Highland. The route would have 16 sta- 
tions and four Park & Rides (two north, 
two south). Project Connect planners 
estimate that by 2030 the completed LPA 
would serve 16,000-20,000 daily riders, 
adding nearly 10,000 new transit riders to 
the system. In addition to the construc- 
tion’s $1.38 billion construction cost. Project 
Connect estimates an additional $22 million 
annually for operations and maintenance. 

The details of the $400 million in pro- 
posed road projects are still to be confirmed 
by Council action, but the SMP describes 
projects primarily along 1-35, as well as cor- 
ridor studies elsewhere. For a summary of 
those projects, see “Council on 
Transportation,” Aug. 1. 


The Campaign Begins 

Once the bond proposal is made official, 
the campaigns - for and against - will offi- 
cially begin. Under state law, the planners 
who designed the project (as public employ- 
ees) can provide explanatory and education- 
al materials, but cannot directly advocate for 
the project. Proponents who aren’t restricted 


24 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE AUGUST 8, 2014 austinchronicle.com 



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austinchronicle.com AUGUST 8 , 2014 the Austin chronicle 25 







RAIL AND ROADS continued from p.24 


ADVOCACY, ETHICS, AND OPPOSITION 



BowntfiN>! JL 




While opponents of the urban rail plan have relentlessly voiced the content makes no mention of opposing viewpoints or data, this 
that opposition for months, official agencies such as Capital Metro advertising campaign is public relations, not genuine engagement” 
and Project Connect “are in a strict ‘education only, no advo- In response to AURA’S letter. Project Connect’s Kyle Keahey 
cacy’ position,” says Cap Metro’s John Julitz - as is required by described the $157,000 campaign, which began on June 2 and con- 

Texas state law regulating the use of public funds for political eluded this week, as an “educational and project awareness effort 

advertising (Texas Election Code § 255.003). Nevertheless, not in mass media.” He also said that all educational material “is 
everyone agrees on what constitutes “political advocacy.” reviewed by both project management team members and legal 

Writing on July 11 to Capital Metro board members, AURA’S counsel to verify content and ensure compliance with election laws.” 

Project Connect Central Corridor Working Group co-chairs Brad Denton and Absalom responded that, while they don’t question 

Absalom and Marcus Denton questioned what they called the Project’s legal opinions, they are “much less confident that you 

Project Connect’s “aggressive marketing campaign.” While recogniz- [Keahey] understand that spending taxpayer dollars promoting a 

ing that “some advertisements seem intended to convey basic infer- controversial urban rail proposal is unethical and erodes public 

mation,” they argued that other ads, such as the radio campaign, trust.” Indeed, they say, the campaign should have included materi- 

“seem like political advocacy.” The letter does not cite any particular als arguing against itself: “opposing viewpoints and data” - a pre- 
passages or statements the writers find objectionable, but argues sumed obligation to undermine the project altogether, while doing 

instead that the campaign is unethical by omission “since the rest of opponents’ work for them. - M.M. 


BOTH SIDES OF THE TRACKS: PRO AND CON ON RAIL 

Independent groups publicly supporting the Independent groups publicly opposing 

city of Austin urban rail proposal include: the urban rail proposal include: 

Alliance for Public Transportation Congress for a New AURA 

Real Estate Council of Austin Urbanism (Central Texas) Our Rail 

Downtown Austin Alliance ATX Safer Streets Central Austin Community Development Corp. 

Austin Sierra Club Brazos Tech District Austin Rail Now 

Austin Gets Around Let’s Go Austin PAC Coalition on Sustainable Transportation 

Downtown Austin Neighborhood Association University of Texas-Austin 

Note: This list includes those groups that have taken a public position on the Project Connect proposal, as of Aug. 1. 


last week, bundling road improvements into 
the rail proposal appears to have earned the 
support of the Greater Austin Chamber of 
Commerce’s board of directors. Chamber 
Senior Vice President Jeremy Martin called 
the addition of road improvements “very 
important, because the No. 1 thing we hear 
from Chamber members is that we need to 
improve traffic congestion, and the Chamber 
has long supported a multimodal approach 
to improving regional mobility. ... It’s impor- 
tant that we pursue mobility improvements 
in a systemic fashion. There’s no one single 
project that will fix traffic, and the improve- 
ments are needed citywide.” Referring indi- 
rectly to the length of time required to realize 
the rail project, Martin added, “Presenting 
improvements that everyone can see in their 
daily lives is very important.” 

For plan supporters, combining the rail 
proposal with road investments is an obvi- 
ous strategy. Jeb Boyt, chair of the Alliance 
for Public Transportation (APT) and a sup- 
porter of the proposal, noted that bundling 
road and rail together in a transportation 
bond is pretty standard, and experience has 
shown that in general, bundled bonds are 
more successful on the ballot. 

Not everyone agrees. Public transit advo- 
cates Scott Morris and Lyndon Henry, who 
strongly oppose this particular plan, issued 
a press release in late June denouncing how 
the LPA had been “hastily bundled with 
hundreds of millions of dollars of highway 
projects to increase support and private 
funding for the rail’s planned political cam- 
paign.” They said they “oppose combining 
an urban rail decision with unrelated high- 
way infrastructure that would be otherwise 
unneeded with a good rail plan.” 


In addition to the Chamber and APT, other 
groups have expressed support for the plan, 
including Austin Gets Around, the Downtown 
Austin Alliance, the Downtown Austin 
Neighborhood Association, the Central Texas 
chapter of the Congress for a New Urbanism, 
and the Let’s Go Austin PAC. According to a 
mid-July press release. Let’s Go Austin, 
formed in March to support the bond pro- 
posal, has already raised more than $73,000. 
PAC treasurer Greg Hartman said the PAC 
“intends to raise at least $500,000” over the 
next few months leading up to the election. 
They’ve added PR muscle to help make that 
happen - Lynda Rife has been hired to be the 
PAC’s campaign manager, and she said the 
group is on track to meet its fundraising goal. 


Both sides of the debate recognize that 
the plan’s cost - and consequently, tax 
increases - could hinder public support. By 
some estimates, the average Austin home- 
owner will pay about $180 more in annual 
property taxes if the bond is passed. Boyt 
admitted, “Right now, there’s a lot of con- 
cern in the community about taxes, espe- 
cially with home values going up, with no 
end in sight.” However, Boyt emphasizes 
the price of a missed opportunity: “The cost 
of not doing something is huge.” 

Supporters argue that the plan is clearly 
worth the investment: For $180 a year - $15 
more a month in taxes on the average home 
- voters can get a system that could offer 


additional transportation options and alle- 
viate congestion even for those that won’t 
use the system. They argue that if the pro- 
posal is rejected, voters “save” $15 a month 
- but at a cost of perpetuating and steadily 
exacerbating congestion problems. As Mar- 
tin put it, “We just can’t afford to say no.” 

On the Other Hand ... 

Opponents remain unconvinced. In an 
op-ed for the Statesman, AURA co-chair 
Marcus Denton notes that “many of the 
city’s staunchest public transportation pro- 
ponents oppose the road-rail bond package 
as a threat to the city’s transportation future 
and a setback for walkable urbanism in 
Austin.” (AURA was formerly an acronym 


for “Austinites for Urban Rail Action,” but 
now just calls itself a “land use and trans- 
portation advocacy group.”) Denton objected 
to the $400 million in road projects, quoting 
Project Connect’s initial position - “build- 
ing roads only encourages more single 
occupancy vehicle use and increases con- 
gestion and pollution” - and argued that 
they would override any benefits of the rail 
investment. Denton supports public transit, 
but considers the current rail proposal “the 
wrong route, selected for the wrong rea- 
sons.” Henry of Austin Rail Now (another 
small transit advocacy group) calls the pro- 
posal a “meandering senseless route.” One 
of the proposal’s “gigantic problems,” he 


says, is that it “raises tax rates to put urban 
rail in the wrong place.” 

According to AURA and Our Rail, the 
more western Guadalupe/Lamar corridor - 
which was preferred in 2000 - should be the 
“top priority for building the city’s first 
urban rail alignment” (from an Our Rail 
press release). For these opponents, Guada- 
lupe/Lamar isn’t just the best option; it’s 
the only option. Our Rail has stated that the 
group “opposes a Project Connect ballot 
measure containing any mass transit invest- 
ment that threatens the future develop- 
ment of urban rail in the Guadalupe/North 
Lamar Corridor.” 

It’s not certain if that targeted opposition 
has staying power. In April, the Central 
Austin Community Development Corpora- 
tion’s “I want to ride LIGHT RAIL on 
Guadalupe/North Lamar!” petition passed 
1,000 signatures. (The CACDC is another 
small advocacy group with a grandiose 
name.) As of July 29, the names had reached 
1,092. It’s difficult to determine whether 
those initial Guadalupe/Lamar corridor 
supporters will come to support the current 
proposal, or if, like Our Rail, they’re sup- 
portive of only the G/L investment. 

These critics fear that the plan’s “high 
cost will hinder and constrain future rail 
development,” such as potential invest- 
ments in Guadalupe/Lamar. As vehement 
opponent Mike Dahmus argued to the 
Chronicle in April, “If that’s the next line 
that we’ll build, we will not get a chance to 
build Guadalupe/Lamar ever, and we will 
not get a chance to build another rail line 
somewhere else for 20, 30, or even 40 years.” 
Denton called the proposal “worse than 
doing nothing.” 


Critics fear that the plan’s “high cost will hinder 
and constrain future rail development,” such as 
potential investments in Guadalupe/Lamar. 


26 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE AUGUSTS, 2014 austinchronicle.com 



Early in the planning process, the Guad- 
alupe/Lamar corridor appeared to be the 
front-runner. UT’s Student Government 
General Assembly endorsed the Guadalupe/ 
Lamar subcorridor on the west side of cam- 
pus, convenient to the West Campus stu- 
dent population. Project Connect’s own 
public outreach workshop surveys found 
that the Guadalupe/Lamar route consis- 
tently garnered a plurality and occasionally 
a majority of the public preference votes. 

Mayor Leffingwell, however, says the 
Guadalupe/Lamar corridor ranked higher 
on planners’ matrices than the chosen 
Highland corridor only when the process 
didn’t take into account future growth. He 
said it would be “irresponsible” to plan for 
no growth. The planners’ numbers reflect - 
when future growth is considered in the 
rankings - that the Highland corridor 
becomes the better investment. 

Henry has written that the current plan 
works “not only to forsake Guadalupe- 
Lamar, but also to forsake the heart of the 
West Campus, with the 3rd-highest residen- 
tial density in Texas, and its lively commer- 
cial activity.” While forsaking West Campus, 
Henry says, “Austin taxpayers are expected 
to subsidize UT administrators’ appetite for 
eastward expansion of the backwater East 
Campus with much lower density and less 
activity.” However, Pat Clubb, UT Vice 
President and the university’s representa- 
tive on CCAG, has said that San Jacinto now 
divides the campus relatively equally - 
especially with the LBJ Library, Bass Con- 
cert Hall, Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium, 
and the under-construction medical school 
and its accompanying “innovation district.” 

Boyt recognizes the appeal of the G/L cor- 
ridor, but said that it’s currently being 
served (by the new Bus Rapid Transit) and 
that adding urban rail now would come with 
“some huge challenges and questions.” 
Capital Metro board member John Lang- 
more, who also served on CCAG, says that 
more of the community would likely be frus- 
trated if the Guadalupe/Lamar were chosen 
as the first route than are currently frus- 
trated that it wasn’t. Few drivers would be 
happy with two or three years of construc- 
tion cutting Lamar down to two lanes. And 
even if the city did want to invest in 
Guadalupe/Lamar rail, the MetroRapid on 
G/L has a 20-year ETA contract that Mayor 
Leffingwell insists “can’t be undone.” Project 
Connnect lead Kyle Keahey said that that 
BRT investment won’t even be evaluated by 
the ETA before accumulating two years of 
data - and the ETA wouldn’t consider invest- 
ing in the corridor for rail until the BRT’s 
impact has been evaluated. While Keahey 
insists that G/L was a serious option all 
along in the process, he admits that planners 
couldn’t risk upsetting the ETA - “the hand 
that feeds us” - which is expected ultimately 
to cover half of the rail project’s cost. 

It goes without saying that longtime anti- 
rail groups, most prominently the Coalition 
on Sustainable Transportation organized by 
former Tracer CEO Jim Skaggs, also reject 
this latest proposal. They routinely cite long- 
time rail opponent Randal O’Toole of the lib- 
ertarian Cato Institute, who has argued that 


the city should instead invest in more buses: 
“For much less than the cost of a single fixed- 
guideway transit line serving a few travelers, 
Austin can both improve bus service and 
relieve traffic congestion for all travelers.” 
More recently, the transportation bond has 
begun to be an issue in the 10-1 Council cam- 
paign, with some anti-tax candidates already 
denouncing it as “a boondoggle” and others 
hanging fire until the proposal becomes an 
actual ballot proposition. Leffingwell 
acknowledged that the current political con- 
text - including a spreading backlash against 
property taxes - is “a little scary,” but says he 
remains “very confident” that the plan can 
win over the public in November. 

Martinez said, “Not everyone is in agree- 
ment with 100 percent of this package. But 
I don’t think we anticipated trying to get 
100 percent agreement on any potential 
bond package. ... I’m optimistic that enough 
folks in our community understand the 
importance of these projects and will be 
supportive of them.” 

It will be interesting to see how most of the 
G/L supporters end up voting, and if the 
unlikely coalition of road warriors and disap- 
pointed transit advocates will be enough to kill 
the bond. Beyond November, Morris says he’s 
confident that if the current plan is rejected, 
“The people are prepared to get back on the 
horse and get this pointed in the right direc- 
tion” - i.e., building rail on Guadalupe/Lamar. 
Morris believes a new proposal could be pre- 
pared and presented to voters “in the 2016 
time frame.” That’s an extraordinary opti- 
mism to rest on freshmen council members 
who, under this scenario, would have just been 
elected by voters who simultaneously rejected 
rail - not to mention recalling the checkered 
history of mass transit votes in Austin. 

Leffingwell, recalling the narrowly 
defeated 2000 light rail plan - which initi- 
ated a stasis that persists to this day, 14 
years later - thinks that should urban rail 
lose in November, the next opportunity 
might take another 14 years. He told the 
Chronicle in June, “There is no Plan B.” ■ 



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austinchronicle.com AUGUST 8, 2014 the Austin chronicle 27 




BMTH HNNUHL OUSTIN CHRDNfCLC HOT SHUCE CONTEST ENTRN FORM 


To participate in the contest, please mail this form with a check or money 
order to Austin Chronicle, Attn.: Hot Sauce Festival, PO Box 49066, Austin, 
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event. Check in at Fiesta Gardens between 10:30 and 11:30 am on Sunday, 
Aug. 24. Please bring 1 pint if your sauce is made at home or 1 quart if it is 
made in a commercial kitchen in a sturdy disposable container. Entry into 
the the contest entitles entrant to one T-shirt regardless of number of salsas 
entered. For more info, visit austinchronicle.com/HotSauce. 


NAME: 


ADDRESS: 


CITY/STATE/ZIP: 

PHONE: 

E-MAIL: 


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Commercial bottlers MUST PURCHASE A BOOTH TO PARTICIPATE IN THE 
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28 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE AUGUSTS, 2014 austinchronicle.com 



Vulnerability/ 
Connectivity: Part 1 


Dark Angel premiered October 3, 2000. 
Created by James Cameron and Charles H. 
Eglee, the Fox series pilot opened with 
eerily crew-cut children in their jammies 
fleeing in the snow and getting shot. Cut to 
Jessica Alba on a motorcycle in a dilapidat- 
ed Seattle with drones patrolling overhead. 

Alba narrated: “They used to say one 
nuclear bomb can ruin your whole day. It 
was sort of a joke until the June morning 
when those terrorist bozos whacked us with 
an electromagnetic pulse from 80 miles up. 
You always hear people yapping about how 
it was all different before the Pulse - land of 
milk and honey, blah, blah, blah, blah - 
with plenty of food and jobs, and things 
actually worked. ... Americans really 
thought they had it dialed in, money hang- 
ing out the butt. But it was all just a bunch 
of ones and zeros on a computer someplace. 
So when that bomb went kablooey, and the 
electromagnetic pulse turned all the ones 
and zeros into plain old zeros, everyone was 
like, ‘No way!’ America’s just another broke 
ex-superpower looking for a handout and 
wondering why.” 

The writers compressed Alba’s narration 
after the pilot: “Terrorists set off a nuclear 


device 80 miles up. The electromagnetic 
pulse fried every computer chip within a 
thousand miles. We went from superpower 
to Third World country overnight.” 

Google “electromagnetic pulse” and 
you’ll find that Dark Angel wasn’t kidding, 
and that the usual suspects are developing 
electromagnetic pulse weapons that don’t 
require nukes. 

In 2000, Dark Angel’s Pulse could merely 
cripple society, but now everything runs on 
chips. Cars, trucks, planes, trains, ships. 
Hospitals. Power grids. Water systems. Gas 
pumps. Appliances. Communications. 
Manufacturing. Retail. And just about 
everything military. Chips rule. 

That’s why U.S. counterintelligence 
“studies, with code names like Dark Angel,” 
try to catch up to the stunning reality of 
society’s vulnerability (The New York 
Times, April 28, 2009). The Times reporter 
thought “cyberwar would not be as lethal as 
atomic war ... nor as visibly dramatic.” Oh 
yeah? What if everything that needs a chip 
within 1,000 miles stopped dead 
at once? 

A U.S. News & World Report headline, 
Jan. 28: “Fatal Inaction: The U.S. Remains 


Vulnerable to EMP [Electromagnetic Pulse] 
Attacks.” John Holdren, “the Obama admin- 
istration’s current top science and technol- 
ogy advisor,” predicted that, if cyberat- 
tacked on a large scale, the U.S. would need 
“a recovery period of 4 to 10 years.” (The 
idea of a recovery period is typical of this 
administration’s chronic optimism.) 

My point is not: “Oh my God, what shall 
we do?!” 

This is what interests me: With eyes wide 
shut (my new favorite phrase), we have col- 
lectively created the most vulnerable soci- 
ety in history; we depend on a hypersensi- 
tive technology for almost everything. 

We were vulnerable to nuclear weapons, 
but that was sort of impersonal: You get 
whacked or you don’t (you probably do). In 
contrast, EMPs would wreck society pre- 
cisely on the personal level, but on a mass 
scale, leaving individuals just about help- 
less: a society based on connectivity but 
unable to connect - to practically anything. 
It wouldn’t be pretty. (Will you have to carry 
a hammer in your car in case your chips fail, 
and you can’t get out, and can’t phone?) 

It’s not just EMPs. What about “space 
weather”? “A once-in-a-century solar storm 
could cause the financial damage of 20 
Hurricane Katrinas” (The New York 
Times, June 17, 2011). That num- 
ber increases exponentially 
with every passing ultradig- 
italized year - and those 
storms do happen. 

Then there’s digital 
longevity. We save 
everything digitally, 

“but digital storage is 
perishable ... Disks cor- 
rode, bits ‘rot’ and hard- 
ware becomes obsolete ... 
and even if you could find 
the right drive [for obsolete 
devices], there’s a good chance 
its magnetic properties will have 
decayed beyond readability” (The New 
York Times, August 7, 2011). 

Maybe quantum and/or DNA computers 
will change that. But right now is right 
now, and this is where we are: in a state of 
fantastic vulnerability that is completely 
obvious and just as completely ignored - 
ignored, that is, except for the issue of 
privacy. 

Thanks to Edward Snowden, we’ve con- 
firmed our suspicions that everything digi- 
tal is vulnerable to surveillance. “As the 
security expert Bruce Schneier wrote 
recently, it isn’t that the Internet has been 
penetrated by the surveillance state; it’s 
that the Internet, in effect, is a surveillance 
state” (The New York Times, June 9, 2013). 

We’re used to headlines like “Is your TV 
watching you? Latest models raise con- 
cerns” (NBCnews.com, March 19, 2012). 
Or these, from The New York Times: 
“Facebook Tinkers With Users’ Emotions 
in News Feed Experiment” (June 29) and 
“Unblinking Eyes Track Employees” 
(July 9). 

We take in stride things like: “Chinese 
hackers ... broke into the computer net- 
works of the United States government 


agency that houses the personal informa- 
tion of all federal employees ... targeting 
the files on tens of thousands ... who have 
applied for top-secret security clearances” 
(The New York Times, July 9). 

And we love the so-called Cloud, where 
we’re invited to store our data and our 
digital possessions, though we’ve no idea 
where a particular cloud may be, how it’s 
monitored, who has access, or “Where’s 
the plug?” 

But we do know it’s not a cloud, right? It’s 
an enormous warehouse packed with 
machines that require lots of air conditioning. 

Isn’t it interesting that our wondrous 
computers depend for their existence on 
the lowly air conditioner? Air conditioners 
depend on a digitally manipulated power 
grid. Power grids depend on generators 
propelled by gas, water, coal, nukes, wind, 
and even sun, plus jillions of digital circuits 
that in turn depend on . . . you get the idea. 
Connectivity: vulnerability. 

On the one hand, as a society, we buy 
the government’s line about the need for 
constant war and believe its uncorrobo- 
rated statements about terrorists, so 
obsessed with safety that the majority is 
happy to give up constitutional rights in 
safety’s name. 

On the other hand, we’ve 
chosen to be more vulnerable, 
with a more unsafe infra- 
V structure, than any society 
in history - and the col- 
lective stance seems to 
be that it’s not a choice, 
and all this just some- 
how happened because 
we delight in the conve- 
nience of our devices. 
Sleepwalkers with eyes 
wide shut. 

Americans like to ask, 
“What should we do about 
that?” It’s a phony question. It 
exists merely so we may quickly come to 
the conclusion that we can do nothing. 
Then we change the channel. 

Maybe it’s a species thing. 

Don’t look now, but, as yet, we have no 
understanding of why we do what we do as 
a species, collectively, beyond the fragile 
boundaries of individuality. 

Why, rather suddenly, is there this spe- 
cies imperative to connect, connect, con- 
nect - not ideologically, but electronically? 
As a species, we lust so desperately to con- 
nect that we risk our very civilization on the 
gamble of circuitry. We don’t care that it’s 
desperate or that it’s a gamble. We don’t let 
that cross our so-called minds. We’re excit- 
ed beyond measure by a massive power of 
connection that can be held in one’s hand. 
This very instrument I type on can connect 
to practically anything. We wipe the concur- 
rent vulnerability from our consciousness, 
privately and collectively - the dangers are 
in plain sight, but invisible. 

It’s a helluva experiment. I wonder why 
we’re doing it. 

Anyway, here’s to you and me, teetering 
on an edge that’s paper-thin and as wide as 
the head of a pin. ■ 



austinchronicle.com AUGUST 8, 2014 the Austin chronicle 29 




ARTS LISTINGS 


[SliTTTTH fTTTITf iTT?^ 



The Nixon Tapes’ 

WHAT HISTORIAN DOUGLAS BRINKLEY HEARD 
FROM THE 37TH PRESIDENT MAY SURPRISE YOU 


Forty years ago this month, President Richard Milhous Nixon resigned from 
office. Since that time, his actions and words have been scrutinized in an attempt 
to make sense of his tragic legacy. For historians, the most important part of the 
official record is 3,000 hours of secretly taped conversations in the Oval Office. 

Out of this treasure trove of documentary material, historians Douglas Brinkley 
and Luke Nichter have mined The Nixon Tapes, a look at the non-Watergate por- 
tion of this material. That infamous break-in and its resulting scandal may be the 
most titillating and memorable part of the Nixon White House, but there was 
much more to his presidency. 

While Nichter runs www.nixontapes.org, an online compendium of the recordings, 
Brinkley can be seen on television, where he’s often found chatting with Charlie 
Rose as the official CBS News presidential historian. He can also be seen 
around Austin, where he’s lived with his wife and three children since leaving New 
Orleans post-Katrina. He talked with the Chronicle about his latest work. 

- Rod Machen 


Austin Chronicle: How did you get 

involved in collaborating with Luke 
Nichter on The Nixon Tapes? 

Douglas Brinkley: Well, a few years 
ago I was doing a book called Tour of 
Duty about John Kerry and the 
Vietnam War. And I started doing 
research on how Nixon was trying to 
destroy Kerry, who was at that point in 
1970 running the Vietnam Veterans 
Against the War. John Kerry had given 
me a lot of personal letters and mem- 
orabilia from his Vietnam era, but I 
was looking into the Nixon tapes, and I 
came upon Luke Nichter, who was real- 
ly working to make sense out of a lot 
of the garbled tapes. He teaches at 
Texas A&M. He helped me find some 
stuff about Nixon going after Kerry 
which I used in my book. 

Luke and I, as fellow Cold War his- 
torians, decided to embark on a book 
project where we went through all of 
the non-Watergate tapes. Nixon 
would have burned the tapes if it 
was Just Watergate-related, but Nixon 
thought this was hugely important 
material about how he handled 
things like the Vietnam War, detente 
with the Soviet Union, the recognition 
of the People’s Republic of China, on 
and on. 

AC; / just finished watching the new 
HBO documentary on Nixon, and it 
changed my perception of him a bit. 
Even with all of the horrible things he 
said and did, I found myself a little sym- 
pathetic for the man. Did you have any 
change in your perception of him after 
going through this material? 

DB; Yes, I did. The main one is, I never 
quite realized how hands-on Nixon was, 
that it was his policy with the China 



breakthrough, not Henry Kissinger’s. 

He Just overshadowed Kissinger. The 
progenitor of Nixon’s achievements 
was Nixon himself. 

Also, particularly in the Vietnam War, 

I didn’t realize Nixon was micromanag- 
ing the war, calling the Pentagon, tak- 
ing admirals and generals to the wood- 
shed, almost daily serving as a field 
general from the White House. 

But also, Nixon many times said, 
“Look, I’m trying to hold the center. 
What liberals need to know is, if you 
lose me, you’re getting a hard-right 
America.” Nixon was always willing to 
be bipartisan, so there are a lot of sur- 
prises in the man. It’s Nixon who creat- 
ed the Environmental Protection 
Agency. Clean Air and Water Acts. 
Endangered Species Act. Promoted 
affirmative action. One could go on 
and on with Nixon as a New Deal liber- 
al on domestic policy and a hawk, but 
one with great geo-political skills. 



All that sounds pretty good, except 
the vulgarity of Nixon and his willing- 
ness to obstruct Justice and abuse 
power made him unsuitable for the 
presidency. I know it’s impossible to 
extract Watergate from Nixon’s legacy, 
but if you can start looking at Nixon 
and U.S. foreign policy-making, you 
realize Just how astute a reader of the 
international scene he was, even 
though in my opinion he didn’t take 
human rights and humanitarian con- 
cerns into consideration often enough. 
AC: My first exposure to you was from 
the book The Majic Bus, your retelling 
of the road trip/history/literature class 
you taught. For someone in college, feel- 
ing the energy of Gen X in the air, this 
book was a revelation. How do you look 
back on it 20 years later? 

DB: Well, now I’m the father of three 
children; I’m not able to go live on a 
bus and do semesters around the 
country like I did when I was young. 

But those were some of the best days 
of my life. I have some of my sharpest 
memories from running the Majic bus. 

A lot of people we would visit have 
passed: poet Allen Ginsburg or play- 
wright Arthur Miller; Arthur Schlessinger 
Jr., the historian; John Kenneth 
Galbraith, economist. Waylon Jennings 
was on the Majic Bus. Townes Van 
Zandt from Austin was on the bus. 

Many of the people we visited are all 
gone now, so I was glad to make those 
memories for the students by introduc- 
ing them to some of the really talented 
icons of American arts and culture. 

Brinkley and Nichter will read from The 
Nixon Tapes Wednesday, Aug. 13, 7pm, at 
BookPeople, 603 N. Lamar. For more informa- 
tion, visit www.bookpeople.com. 



Vortex Cosplay Expo 

ALL WEEK, AUSTIN’S MASTERS OF 
THEATRICAL FANTASY SHOW YOU HOW 
TO MAKE AN OUT-OF-THIS-WORLD LOOK 

When you have Syfy running a reality series about fans cre- 
ating costumes for conventions and CNN covering cosplay at 
Comic-Con, it’s safe to say this once-fringe pastime has hit the 
mainstream. And when the marketplace is working overtime to 
turn a buck on the popularity of people fashioning fantasywear, 
the announcement of a “Cosplay Expo” might warrant a bit of 
caveat emptor. Unless, that is, said Expo is produced by 
Vortex Repertory Company. The Vortex was cosplay before 
cosplay was cool. For more than 20 years, it’s been conjuring 
fantastic worlds peopled by humans and transhumans wearing 
extravagant, artfully crafted outfits in musical fantasies such 
as Sarah Silver Hands, The Dragonfly Princess, Pythia Dust, and 
the cybernetic operas Elytra and The X &Y Trilogy. 

The artists behind these productions have considerable 
knowledge and skills to share - which is Just what they’ll be 
doing nightly Aug. 10-16. Evenings begin with Cosplay Happy 
Hour (5pm), followed by 90 minutes of workshops and presen- 
tations with artists such as composer/imagineer Chad Salvata 
and Vortex Artistic Director Bonnie Cullum (6pm). Then comes a 
look at a new operatic fantasy from Salvata and Cullum, though 
this one has taken the cybernetic cinematic: Octia of the Pink 
Ocean is an 80-minute film exploring concepts and characters 
from the epic ethos universe. After each screening (8pm nightly, 
also 10pm Friday-Saturday) will be a Q&A with Octia’s creators. 

In addition, the Cosplay Expo includes an opening night 
party (Sun., 10pm-12mid), a special Heroes/Villains/Cosplay 
Edition Trivia Night (Tue., 7pm), the Kids Kostume Parade (Fri., 
7:15pm), a live music and East Austin handmade arts market 
(Sat., llam-5pm), the Ultimate Cosplay Costume Contest, 
Judged by Christopher Meador (Sat., 11:30pm), and a closing 
party (Sat., ll:30pm-lam). Naturally, participants are encour- 
aged to attend in their favorite cosplay attire. Admission is 
$25 for unlimited access (film included), $50 for a VIP 
Unlimited Pass, and $15 for one-day attendance. 

Workshop Schedule (all start at 6pm unless 
otherwise noted): 

Sun: Karnika the Elytra of GoldSun Sex 
(Eryn Gettys, Salvata, Cullum) 

Mon: Making Leather Gauntlets (Justin LaVergne) 

Tue: Fantasy Makeup Design and Application 
(LaVergne, Melissa Vogt-Patterson) 

Wed: Fantasy Genitalia (Salvata, Helen Parish) 

Thu: Green Screen Stories (Cullum, Tamara L. Farley, Jason Amato) 
Fri: Worbla Wonders (Vogt-Patterson) 

Sat: Cybernetic Movement (cast of Octia) (5pm) 

Headgear for Heroes (Vogt-Patterson, Salvata) 

Nightly: The World of Octia (Salvata) (7:15pm) 

- Robert Faires 

The Cosplay Expo takes place Aug. 10-16, nightly, at the Vortex, 2307 
Manor Rd. For more information, call 512/478-5282 or visit www.vortexrep.org. 


30 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE AUGUSTS, 2014 austinchronicle.com 




STYLE 



Passion Play 


I went through a doll phase 
from age 10 to 14. It started 
when my mom gave my sister 
and me the Madame Alexander 

dolls of her girlhood: Meg and 
Beth from Little Women. Amy was 
next for me, naturally; my sister, 
to my chagrin, got Jo. We 
exhausted Louisa May Alcott’s 
oeuvre, and I moved on to Gone 
With the Wind and fairy tales. I 
loved the tiny strand of pearls 
woven into Rapunzel’s braid, the 
tassels on Scarlett’s velvet cur- 
tain dress. Doll-sized, the cheap- 
est scrap of leftover trim 
becomes impossibly rich. 

A doll is a small-scale human 
figure, traditionally belonging to a 
girl. The dolls made for boys to 
play with are called “action fig- 
ures.” A doll is not an action figure. 
Dolls are quite passive. You can 
play with a doll just by looking at it. 

Looking at classical sculpture 
is supposed to be transforma- 


tive; it impos- 
es universal 
ideals of 
beauty, propor- 
tion, and grace 
on the observer. 

Dolls, by contrast, are 
transformed by their 
observers, by the very fact of 
being observed. Dolls are never 
universal; the more detailed and 
specific, the better the doll. 

That’s what makes them infi- 
nitely collectible; objects of pas- 
sion. Jewelry designer Suzie 
Gallehugh told me about her 
first job out of design school at 
the Madame Alexander company 
in New York. When collectors 
toured the factory, she hid the 
dolls she was working on. Grown 
women would steal them. 

“But what exactly is a doll?” I 
asked a friend. “Something you 
get called by construction work- 
ers,” she said. 


/the y 
^ GOOD ^ 


BY AMY 
GENTRY 


Dolls are passive, but girls 
playing with dolls don’t want to 
be dolls. They want their dolls to 
be them. Whenever possible, 
girls make dolls in their own 
image. Just check out the 
American Girl empire. 

Last week an Orange County 
community panicked when 
vacant-eyed, dust-ruffled dolls 
began appearing on the door- 
steps of families with girl 
children. It turned out 
to be an elderly 
woman anony- 
mously divesting 
herself of the 
fruits of a life- 
long hobby. The 
mothers all 
swore the dolls 
resembled their 
daughters. 

Dolls change to 
reflect us. We clothe 
them in our desires and 
our fears. We read our own 
emotions in their staring eyes. 

What are dolls? 

“All Dolls Are Art,” says the 
sign in the lobby at the Wyndham 
Garden Hotel. The All Dolls Are 
Art Conference and Retreat’s 
founding director Amy Nelson 
first encountered art dolls at the 
International Quilt Festival in 
Houston during a failed effort to 
get herself interested in quilting. 
An engineer at Dell, she wanted 
to tap into her creative side, but 
she quickly found she wanted 
more than two dimensions. 

Dolls are fast because of their 
size, says Nelson. You can finish 
one in two weeks, or even over the 


Did she just blink? (Doll by Kathleen 
Vaughan^ pattern by Angela Jarecki.) 


course of a single, daylong class. 
Dollmaking involves many skill 
sets - sculpting polymer clay, 
stitching and molding and painting 
tiny fabric faces, draping and pat- 
ternmaking, collage and decoup- 
age and quilting and embroidery - 
but it comes fast. Each doll is a 
miniature crash course, as well as 
a finished product. 

The dolls in the exhibition pick 
insistently at the border between 
pretty and creepy. Some, like 
Nelson’s, lean toward the whimsi- 
cal. Others, like Theresa May’s 
“There Was an Old Woman” or 
Clarissa Callesen’s distressed 
baby dolls, actively court horror, 
deconstructing bodies and 
embedding them within other 
bodies, adding extra legs or 
arms, replacing torsos with 
cages. Almost all the faces on 
display are female. 

Dolls are sentimental. They 
talk to you about yourself, and 
you whisper your secrets in their 
shell-like ears. In that respect, 
they have more in common with 
holy icons than action figures. 

With their frozen curls and 
flounces, their buckled shoes 
and their tiny, trapped expres- 
sions, dolls are permanently 
caught at the very edge of ges- 
ture. Waiting to be animated by a 
human glance. 

The word “passion” comes 
from the same root as “passive.” 
Also: “patience.” It originally 
meant suffering. 

Dolls aren’t action figures. Call 
them passion figures. Or just call 
them art. 

Check out the online gallery for 
portraits of the eerie, beautiful 
art dolls from the All Dolls Are Art 
Conference fwww.allartdolls.comj. 




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austinchronicle.com AUGUST 8, 2014 the Austin chronicle 31 










THE ARTS VISUAL ART 



^Buy What You Love’ 


Collector Glenn Fuhrman on ‘A Secret Affair’ and 
living with contemporary art 

BY SETH ORION SCHWAIGER 

“A Secret Affair: Selections From the Fuhrman Family Collection,” now in its final 
weeks at the Contemporary Austin, has received wide-ranging praise for the breakaway 
curatorial tack of new Executive Director Louis Grachos, and for the celebrity-level artists 
whose work, until now, hasn’t been regularly exhibited in Austin. 

Glenn Fuhrman is a co-managing partner at MSD Capital (the private investment firm 
for Michael Dell and his family), a trustee of the Tate Americas Foundation and the 
Museum of Modern Art in New York, a board member of the Institute of Contemporary Art 
in Philadelphia, and the founder of the FLAG Art Foundation. He studied art history along- 
side finance and began collecting contemporary art shortly after beginning his career at 
Goldman Sachs, having been impressed by the collection of contemporary photography in 
its offices. Twenty-some years later, Fuhrman has been listed in Business Insider’s 25 most 
serious Wall Street art collectors, and, with his wife Amanda, in ARTnews’ top 200 most 
active contemporary art collectors, as well as a pile of other lists that basically say, “These 
folks are a big deal.” 

Fuhrman was kind enough to answer our questions about his collection and what he’s 
gained by living with contemporary art. 


Austin Chronicle: You’ve described being 
inspired early on by private collections on 
public display in London. In a way, you’ve 
brought that paradigm to Texas by showing 
art from your collection in Austin. Do you 
hope to inspire future collectors when you 
lend work to institutions? 

Glenn Fuhrman: It’s not something that I 
specifically think about in terms of future 
“collectors.” I do have a keen awareness, 
however, for the way looking at, and living 
with, contemporary art affects my life and 
love the idea of allowing other people to 
potentially have that same experience. You 
don’t have to be an expert or super knowl- 
edgable about art to have an object move 
you in some very positive way, and that is 
what I most like about good art. Providing 
opportunities for other people to have that 
experience is exciting to me. 

AC: Any advice for new collectors? 

GF: Buy what you love, and always buy with 
your eyes and your heart - not your ears. 


AC: Your tastes in that regard seem very 
consistent. The works in “A Secret Affair” 
share common threads: Humor seems very 
important to the work you collect; the same 
could be said of mystery; and much of the 
work addresses the human form. Is this 
representative of your collection, or are 
these threads unique to the curated selec- 
tions for Austin? 

GF: Some of these are more threads that 
Louis saw and decided to focus on, and 
selected works accordingly. In general, we 
are drawn to works that have a real aes- 
thetic appeal but also some additional layer 
of meaning, whether that be social, politi- 
cal, romantic, etc. - something that allows 
the work to be more than just a pretty pic- 
ture. We also have a real attraction to works 
that show the artist’s hand and the labor 
involved in making the work. That’s why 
we love Ewan Gibbs, Richard Forster, and 
Brice Mar den, to name just a few, where 
you can clearly see the hours and hours of 


Glenn and Amanda Fuhrman with Robert 
Therrien^s Table and Four Chairs^ 2003. 

effort that went into making the final work. 
AC: Was there a point when you began col- 
lecting with a public audience in mind? Do 
you still feel like you are adding to the col- 
lection you live with or do you feel like you 
are, in a sense, curating for future exhibi- 
tions like ‘A Secret Affair”? 

GF: At one point, I fell in love with a work 
that was clearly too big to ever be able to 
live with. It was a giant table and chair 
^ sculpture by Robert Therrien. When I 
° decided to buy that work, it was clear that it 
H was for public exhibition - not any personal 
space I would ever live in. With a few excep- 
o tions like this, we still buy almost every- 
th thing with the hopes of living with it either 
in our home or in my office. We always 

> prefer to buy things and take them home to 
^ live with right away whenever possible. 

:o AC: Any favorites in this show? 

> GF: There are so many. We love them all. 
Louis did an amazing job curating the 
show, and the way the works speak to each 
other is very much in keeping with how we 
live with these works when they are 
installed in New York. The interplay 
between works is often as exciting as how 
the works present themselves on their own. 
AC: The idea of living with contemporary 
art seems very important to you. It’s hard to 
imagine having breakfast with Louise 
Bourgeois’ sculptures or working with Marc 
Quinn’s Sphinx within view of your office. 
What’s that like? 

GF: Being surrounded 
by great art is definitely 
life-affirming. It also 
forces your brain to 
constantly think about 
things you may not oth- 
erwise be prodded to 
think about. This can 
be very valuable in a 
work environment 
where thinking cre- 
atively is something 
you are aspiring to. Art 
can also create unique 
environments that change the “atmo- 
sphere” and lead to significant emotional, 
even spiritual, effects on you. Before we 
had our daughter, we had a room in our 
house - now her bedroom - in which we 
installed over 40 works by one of our favor- 
ite artists, Jim Hodges. Shrine isn’t the 
right word, but it was almost like a Zen 
temple. We had couches in there, and I 
would go sit on a couch and look around 
and get into a really lovely mental place. 
Even just being in there and reading the 
newspaper became a special experience. We 
miss that room, but having a nursery with a 
baby in it is even more special. 

AC: You’ve been described in business jour- 
nals as an extraordinarily talented investor. 
Your and Amanda’s philanthropy has also 
been well reported. How would you describe 
your motivations for collecting? Do you also 
see these purchases as an investment? 

GF: I have never looked at collecting as 
investing. They are two very separate and 


distinct parts of my life and brain. We never 
sell anything, so while it is always nice to 
have things appreciate in value, it isn’t 
something we really focus on. Some of the 
works that have not appreciated in a finan- 
cial sense are still works we love as much as 
the ones that have gone up significantly. 
AC: Have you collected work from any 
Texas artists? Are there any on your radar? 
GF: We love the work of Richard Patterson, 
who is British but has lived in Dallas for a 
long time. Austin-based artist Terri 
Thomas is also someone whose work is in 
our collection. Many of the artists we col- 
lect show in Austin at Lora Reynolds 
Gallery. Noriko Ambe, Conrad Bakker, 
Ewan Gibbs, Tom Molloy, Frank Selby, 
and Jim Torok all show with Lora, and 
we have significant holdings of works by 
all of them. 

AC: You and Amanda have a reputation for 
getting to know the artists whose work you 
purchase, educating yourselves well beyond 
what many would expect, visiting studios 
and spending time with the artists socially 
outside the usual functions. From all that 
exposure, it seems you’d have a good idea of 
what makes a successful artist. So any 
advice for emerging artists? 

GF: We find ourselves spending time with 
artists because we like them as people and 
they often think about things in different 
ways than many of the people we normally 
spend time with. As I like to joke, it’s much 
more fun having dinner with a group of art- 
ists than a group of investment bankers. 

We don’t really get 
involved in their cre- 
ative process, however, 
so I don’t really have a 
perspective on why 
some are able to 
achieve that special 
alchemy to make a 
great work of art and 
some aren’t. The only 
advice I have for any- 
one pursuing a chal- 
lenging path is to stay 
the course and just 
keep working and pro- 
ducing as much as you can. Interacting 
with the local museums and galleries is 
also always a good idea. 

AC: What’s next on your art calendar? 

GF: At the Chicago art fair [Expo Chicago], 
FLAG will be presenting an exhibition 
curated by basketball legend Shaquille 
O’Neal. This is the second time we have 
worked with Shaquille as curator. Our show 
in the fall at FLAG is called “Disturbing 
Innocence” and will be curated by artist 
Eric Fischl. We are also working with Louis 
Grachos to bring his incredible show at the 
Contemporary Austin to New York. We 
never expected to have the show travel, but 
it has been received so enthusiastically we 
decided to bring it here. We are confident it 
will be as popular in New York as it has 
been in Austin. ■ 

“A Secret Affair: Selections From the Fuhrman 
Family Collection” is in its last few weeks of exhibi- 
tion at the Contemporary Austin, 700 Congress. For 
more information, visit www.thecontemporaryaustin.org. 


You don’t have to be 
an expert or super 
knowledgable about art 
to hove an object move 
you in some very positive 
way, and that is what I 
most like about good art. ” 
- Glenn Fuhrman 


32 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE AUGUST 8, 2014 austinchronicle.com 






SEPT17-OCT18, 2014 
A lavish new production 
featuring an international cast! 

Music by Richard Rodgers 
Book and Lyrics by Oscar Hannnnerstein II 
Based on "Anna and the King of Siam" by 
Margaret Landon 
Directed by Abe Reybold 
Choreographed by Greg Zane 
Musical Direction by Allen Robertson 
Starring Jill Blackwood 


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CHRISTMAS 



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Directed by Abe Reybold 


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austinchronicle.com AUGUST 8, 2014 the Austin chronicle 33 



REVIEWS 




EXHIBITIONISM 


Pinballing down the rabbit hoie: 
Michaei Vaientine as Tommy 


The Who’s Tommy 

zach Topfer Theatre, 202 s. Lamar, 512/476-0541 

www.zachtheatre.org 

Through Aug. 24 

Running time: 2 hr. 

Dancing girls in striped tights and clown wigs, neon flashing tube 
lights, big bouncing balls in a crowd - it looks a lot like a rave at 
the Topfer Theatre ... only with old people. If musical director Allen 
Robertson had captured the Electric Daisy Carnival sound in Zach 
Theatre’s revival of The Who's Tommy, we’d have been in business. In 
that case, mature audience members would have found themselves 
in the grip of a truly updated rock & roll freneticism. It’s a fantastic 
direction, really, considering the central position of psychedelia in this 
work, but director Dave Steakley simply doesn’t take it far enough. 

Steakley’s nods to Alice in Wonderland are a nice touch, yet the 
connection between psychedelia and Lewis Carroll’s fantasy is hardly 
new, considering Jefferson Airplane recorded “White Rabbit” two years 
before Tommy's 1969 debut. Indeed, with this show it’s something 
old, something new, something borrowed, something blue - and every 
other color of the rainbow. The design palette here is so expansive 
that it includes everything from striking black and white to Eighties 
mauve and all points in between. There are a few momentary techni- 
cal marvels, but this production’s Achilles’ heel is its neglect in the 
realm of consistency. 

Although fabulous on their own, the superficial elements borrowed 
from the culture of electronic dance music are the strange bedfellows 
of an aesthetic that might best be described as straight-up American 
Cheese. As the adult version of the title character, Michael Valentine, 
in his golden, fringed jacket, is a picture-perfect Vegas edition of 
Peter Gallagher’s character in 1980’s The Idolmaker. Since this film 
character - inspired by Fifties teen idol Fabian - is largely dismissed 
as an empty-headed puppet, this seems an odd choice for a character 
described by librettist Pete Townshend in Rolling Stone as a spiritual 
seeker. 



As a character. Tommy - like his rocked-out brother from Pink 
Floyd’s The Wall - has daddy issues. Also, as anyone who’s listened 
to the radio in the last 40 years knows, he sure plays a mean pinball. 
As a precursor to today’s omnipresent video-game craze, pinball is 
rife with symbolic possibilities. Although the infinity-mirror effects on 
the machines here are damned cool. I’m not picking up on any deeper 
significance of the game as a possible gateway drug. 

Speaking of drugs, though, no Seventies-era rock opera would be 
complete without them. Of course, that makes a convenient explana- 
tion for the overwhelming onslaught of colors and stylistic choices 
here: It’s all a fevered, mescaline-fueled dream! It doesn’t need to 
make sense! But isn’t that why we have art: to make life more beauti- 
ful, rational, and poetic than it otherwise would be? This show is a 
trip, all right, but for this participant, not an especially good one. Many 
of my very vocal neighbors in the audience would disagree. Clearly we 
supped on different sides of the mushroom. - Stacy Alexander Smith 



This Is Our Youth 

The Off Center, 2211-4 Hidalgo 

www.punchkin.org 

Through Aug. 10 

Running time: 2 hr., 10 min. 

“Even nowhere can be someplace special,” 
wrote Peter Marks in his /Vew York Times 
review of This Is Our Youth in the mid-Nineties. 
Punchkin Repertory Theatre’s production at 
the Off Center beautifully exemplifies his idea 
in many ways. The setting is specific - an 
Upper West Side apartment in 1982 - but the 
brokenness that’s evident from every angle 
constitutes a vast “nowhere” that permeates 
the far reaches of Kenneth Lonergan’s story. 


Look back in anger: Eric Austin^s Dennis gets 
straight with Clint Harris^ Warren 


o 

° This brokenness is first noticeable in 
H Dannie Snyder and Stuart Field’s fantastically 
w conceptual set, with its Jagged, disconnected 

0 bricks that hang from the ceiling and emanate 
from appliances. The very incomplete but 

1 foreboding apartment wall creates a visual 
I sense of entrapment, from which escape is 

i still possible if its prisoners can beat the dry- 
^ ing mortar. It’s a metaphor for the vices of 
m the plot, including broken families and, espe- 
H cially, drug activity. 

^ Although the play’s three characters expe- 
rience brokenness in unique ways, the acting 
behind them is in no need of mending. This 
is seamless, spot-on characterization - some 
of the best I’ve ever seen in a three-hander. 
Eric Austin never falters in his portrayal of 
drug dealer Dennis, showing amazing stam- 
ina and energy in an intensely angry role. 

Time and again, Austin proves his stunning 
ability to turn on a dime from the abrasive 
and abusive character we see on the outside 
to the sympathetic soul we know resides 
deep beneath. 

As Dennis’ 19-year-old friend Warren, Clint 
Harris delivers a quirkiness that one would 
be hard-pressed to beat. The off-the-wall 
physical profile he creates for his character 


is as consistent as it is complex. We all know 
someone who reminds us of Harris’ Warren, 
yet the spin is all his own. Having stolen 
$15,000 from his father, Warren is in some 
hot water, and he’s bringing buddy Dennis 
along for the ride. Harris and Austin play off 
each other with wonderful chemistry, never 
missing a beat or opportunity to put their 
prowess for subtle choices into action. 

Enter Hannah Burkhauser as Jessica, 
Warren’s crush. In many ways, Jessica 
embodies the dichotomy of Dennis and 
Warren in a single character. Like Dennis, 
she’s raging with anger one moment, but 
she’s geeking out over Warren’s childhood 
toy collection the next. This is the essence 
of Jessica, which Burkhauser brings to the 
fore within her first moments onstage. She’s 
a woman of a thousand faces but no masks; 
each expression is calibrated in moment- 
to-moment response, as in a master tennis 
game. If acting is reacting, these three actors 
are exemplars of the adage. 

Director Dannie Snyder has done espe- 
cially fine work here. The production’s vision 
is cohesive, its moments always motivated. 
Snyder has seen to it that the details aren’t 
left behind and that the big picture remains 
fully intact. 

Bravo, Punchkin Rep, for taking us some- 
place special. - Adam Roberts 


‘Advanced Young Artists: 
Teen Artist + Mentor 
Exhibition’ 

Pump Project, 702 Shady 
www.pumpproject.org 
Through Aug. 9 

For a free spirit, there may be no 
better environment in which to come 
of age than Austin, Texas. The city 
offers innumerable opportunities to 
experience world-class art and an 
overall cultural tone that encourages 
audiences to experience art without 
the sheen of pessimism or depreca- 
tion instead of inspiration. However, 
arts-based scholastic programs are 
no stranger to budget cuts, and out- 
lets for community teens to nurture 
their creativity are often difficult to 
come by, if not unavailable entirely. 

In an effort to further the opportuni- 
ties for artistically inclined teens, 
the Contemporary Austin’s Advanced 
Young Artist program paired 10 high 
school students with locally based 
adult mentors (in this case, such nota- 
ble artists as Michael Anthony Garcfa, 
Dave Culpepper, and Lauren Klotzman) 
to inspire, influence, and ultimately 
collaborate for the exhibition “Teen 
Artist -I- Mentor.” 



Bouncing through an array of medi- 
ums, “Teen Artist -i- Mentor” is an 
overwhelming display of work. The 
pieces were conceived and built over 
a seven-month period, during which 
the young artists met weekly with their 
mentors. The exhibition is impressive 
in regards to breadth. Imagined mytho- 
logical topographic installations sit 
alongside sculptural simple machines 
that speak to civilization’s relationship 
with nature. Street art and political 
performance pieces sit side-by-side. 
“Teen Artist -i- Mentor” doesn’t shy 
away from exploring the seminal ques- 
tions that permeate adolescence, but, 
through the influence of the profes- 
sional artist mentors, it brings those 
inquiries about life and growing up into 
a mature form. This is an enlighten- 
ing look into the influences that drive 
today’s teens while also showcasing 
work from some local favorites. 

- Caltlln Greenwood 


34 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE AUGUSTS, 2014 austinchronicle.com 





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austinchronicle.com AUGUST 8, 2014 the Austin chronicle 35 




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Behind the Case 

FIREHOUSE LOUNGE HITS 
‘CRAFT DIVE’ STRIDE 

As with many good stories, this one started over a late-night 
meal. A year before the Firehouse Hostel and Lounge came to 
be, owner Collin Ballard traveled here from Washington state to 
scout locations for his dream: a new hostel. Staying in Austin’s 
only hostel at the time. Hostelling International Austin on 
Lakeshore Boulevard, Ballard struggled to put together an after- 
dark snack. Manager Mariana Guerrero came to his rescue with 
a bowl of spaghetti. Warmed by pasta, Ballard shared his vision 


of opening an Austin hostel. Guerrero told him, “Well, if you ever 
do, look me up!” 

Ballard’s plan soon found form in the oldest standing fire sta- 
tion in Austin, Washington Fire Hall No. 1, built in 1885 across 
from the then under construction Driskill Hotel. Later it became 
an office building, but it had stood empty for many years when 
Ballard and partner Kent Roth took over in December of 2011. 
The first floor was under a separate lease, but adding a bar to 
the hostel was always part of the future plan. 

From there, the business accelerated through a series of happy 
accidents. The first happened when Ballard and Roth ran an ad 
looking for a manager. When Guerrero walked in to interview - 
over a year after that bowl of pasta - bells rang. Ballard remem- 
bered her simple care, courtesy, and humor. A trio quickly formed. 

February 2012 brought another surprise. The bar space was 
offered long before the team had anticipated. Focus quickly shift- 
ed from hostel construction to getting the bar ready to bring in 
cash. In a record build-out. Firehouse Lounge was ready for 
South by Southwest in March, merely 10 days after the owners 
received the keys. 

The bar has evolved since those crazy two weeks in 2012. The 
owners have relished the lounge’s uniqueness, while standing 
firmly on three main tenets: atmosphere, cocktails, and location. 
But their main attraction may be their entrance, a sliding book- 
case just inside the hostel lobby. 

“People come from all the way around the world and have 
heard about the bookcase,” Guerrero gushes. “And then some 
locals come into the lobby, can’t figure out how to get into the 
lounge, are too scared to ask, and just leave. It’s so funny!” 

Like any hotel bar, the lounge has a built-in clientele with 70 

beds upstairs filled with internation- 
al travelers. Still, the bar tosses a 
far wider net and prides itself on a 
diverse clientele, low pretension, 
and hospitality. Intent on staying in 
step with its core clientele - most 
of whom are traveling on a shoe- 
string budget - the lounge offers 
creative drinks for under $11 and 
small, rustic plates mostly under $10. 

“There just can’t be disparity between who we want to host 
upstairs and what we offer down here. It’s a fine line,” Guerrero 
says. “We’re also, in many ways, the everyman’s bar, where peo- 
ple come after work.” 

But Firehouse Lounge offers anything but everyday drinks. “We 
like to call it ‘craft dive,”’ Guerrero says. That can mean some- 
thing as lovely as a perfect Old Fashioned or vodka gimlet or one 
of several local beers on tap. The food menu is filled with 
imported meats, cheese, and sandwiches on Easy Tiger breads. 
Bowls of smoked almonds keep customers in the seats. And 
there is always the option to just stay the night, dozing in an 
unadorned bed upstairs where volunteer firefighters staked claim 
a century ago. - Grade Salem 


Firehouse Lounge 

605 Brazos, 512/201-2522 
Sat.-Thu.y 5pm-2am; 

Fri., 4pm-2am; 
food menu available 
Wed.-Sat., 5-ll:30pm 
www.firehousehostel.com 


Meal Times Aug. 7-14 

> EAT OUT FOR GOOD Eleven days of delicious giving. 
Participating restaurants listed online. Aug. 3-13. 

www.eatoutforgood.com. 

> PAY IT FORWARD WITH DANIEL CURTIS Celebrated 
chefs raise money for those with spinal cord inju- 
ries. Thu., Aug. 7, 6-lOpm. AT&T Executive Education 
and Conference Center, 1900 University Avenue, 
512/404-1900. $75, $125 VIP. 

> SUPPER FRIENDS: SUMMER DELIGHT Celebrate the 
season’s best ingredients. Fri., Aug. 8, 7-10:30pm. 
Swoop House at 2Dine4 Catering, 3012 Gonzales, 
512/467-6600. $50. www.swoopevents.com/swoop- 
house/event/supper-friends-summer-delight. 

> AUSTIN ICE CREAM FEST We scream, you scream 
... Sat, Aug. 9, 10am-7pm. Fiesta Gardens, 2100 
Jesse E. Segovia St, 512/480-8318. $10; 

kids 8 & under free, www.icecreamfestival.org. 


y EXPERIMENTAL COFFEE SERVICE Three 
course coffee flight. Saturdays, llam-5pm. 
Houndstooth Coffee Downtown, 401 
Congress Ste. 100-C, 512/394-6051. $20. 

y UPDATED SOUTHERN CLASSICS 

COOKING CLASS Chef Michael Osborne 
demonstrates some Southern hospitality. 
Sat, Aug. 9, 5-7pm. Faraday’s Kitchen 
Store, 12918 Shops Parkway #540, 
512/266-5666. $49. 
www.faradayskitchenstore.com . 

y SUNDAY FUNDAY: FOOD TRUCK AND 
SMOKEHOUSE Finger-licking summer 
grub. Sun., Aug. 10, 12-4pm. Hyatt 
Regency Austin, 208 Barton Springs Rd., 
512/477-1234. 

y TASTE AND DONATE HAPPY HOUR 

Ten percent of sales benefit the Austin 
Symphony. Mon.-Sat, Aug. 11-16, 3-6pm. 
Cafe Josie, 1200 W. Sixth, 512/322-9226. 


y KATE PAYNE PRESERVING SERIES: 

FIG JAM Preserve the last flavors of sum- 
mer. Mon., Aug. 11, 6-8pm. Whole Foods 
Market Culinary Center, 525 N. Lamar, 
512/542-2340. $15. www.katepayne.net. 

y ESPRESSO HAPPY HOUR Get your 
morning buzz with free espresso shots. 
Tuesdays, 10-llam. Thunderbird Cafe 
and Tap Room, 1401 Koenig, 
512/420-8660. Free. 

y WINE AND DINE WITH CHEF DAVID BULL 

Meet one of Austin’s most lauded chefs. 
Wed., Aug. 13, 6:30pm. The Austonian, 

200 Congress, 512/623-3633. $175. 

www.austinfoodwineaiiiance.org. 

> EAT THE HEAT Local chefs take you to 
Wonderland. Thu., Aug. 14, 6:30-9:30pm. 
Marriott Renaissance Austin Hotel, 

9721 Arboretum Blvd., 512/343-2626. 
$75. www.naceaustin.com. 


food-o-file 

BY VIRGINIA B. WOOD 

I’m really looking forward to the Slow Food 
Grub Trivia hosted by John Antonelli in the new 

location at Saengerrunde Hall (1607 San Jacinto) 
on Sunday, Aug. 17. This is always such a fun 
party, with cool prizes for the winners, plus refresh- 
ments from local restaurants, brewers, and distill- 
ers, and halftime entertainment from the Salt & 
Time butcher Bryan Butler. I’m determined to put 
together a team of Chronide food writers to chal- 
lenge teams from other media outlets. 

The area near the corner of East Sixth and Chicon 
is booming with hospitality development. Look for a 
new Cuvee Coffee Shop (2000 E. Sixth) to open 
Aug. 11 with all manner of excellent coffee drinks, 
plus beer, wine, and their signature Black & Blue 
nitrogenated cold brew on tap, in addition to pas- 
tries from Walton’s Fancy and Staple and meat 
and cheese plates courtesy of Antonelli’s Cheese 
Shop. We’re also looking forward to the opening of 
Gardner, the vegetable-focused sibling restaurant 
to Contigo, and the second outlet of Counter 
Cafe, which owner Debbie Davis reports will be 
twice as large as the original and offer patio seat- 
ing. Will keep you posted on opening dates as they 
become clearer. 

Another area seeing lots of hospitality activity is 
the stretch of Airport between 45th and East 53rd, 
with contractors busy working on the new homes 
of both Sala & Betty (5201 Airport) and Bun 
Belly (5001 Airport) while one of the abandoned 
convenience store corner locations is now sur- 
rounded by fencing, which usually signals imminent 
demolition. No word yet on when the new 
Omelettry (4631 Airport) is slated to complete 
the emerging restaurant row in that area. 

Whole Foods has just announced that the 
Public Domain container bar (11920 Domain Dr.) 
in their Domain store is now open 6:30-8am daily, 
offering coffee, juices, pastries, and breakfast 
tacos - including a new taco made with pulled 
pork and kimchi which should start folks’ days off 
with a big jolt of flavor. 

The Wine and Food Foundation of Texas 

announced the distribution of more than $50,000 
to four food- and wine-based Texas nonprofit organi- 
zations last week: Austin Food for Life, which 
works to create health care solutions for all mem- 
bers of the local food community; the Sustainable 
Food Center, an umbrella organization that oper- 
ates several farmers’ markets and offers various 
programs that support healthy food choices in the 
community; Texas A&M AgriLife Viticulture and 
Fruit Lab in Fredericksburg, which assists the Texas 
wine grape industry with research into pathogens 
that are detrimental to fruit crops; and the Texas 
Sommelier Association (TEXSOM), an organization 
that promotes public awareness of professional 
wine service as well as the education of future wine 
professionals. Congratulations to all the recipients. 

Uchiko (4200 N. Lamar) implements a new veg- 
etarian program with an a la carte vegetarian menu, 
a Monday sake social hour with price bargains on 
non-meat items, and a monthly 10-course omakase 
tasting menu made up of the greatest vegetarian 
hits from the regular menu as well as some new 
items. This sharable menu will be in the $160-180 
price range and debuts sometime this month. 


austinchronicle.com AUGUST 8, 2014 the Austin chronicle 37 







Please Lick the Art 


Keith Kreeger’s ceramics get up close and personal 

BY MELANIE HAUPT 


At the beginning of Edith Wharton’s 1905 
novel, The House of Mirth, the tragic hero- 
ine Lily Bart grills her soul mate, Lawrence 
Selden, on the practice of collecting books 
and Americana. When asked whether he 
collects the artifacts associated with 
American history, folklore, and cultural 
practices, Selden replies, “I’m not really a 
collector, you see; I simply like to have good 
editions of the books I am fond of ... Your 
real collector values a thing for its rarity. I 
don’t suppose the buyers of Americana sit 
up reading them all night.” 

Selden pompously articulates the tension 
between gathering artifacts for use and for 
status. More than a century later, we still 
hoard foraged treasures, pawing through 
antique markets for potential heirlooms. 
We peruse estate sales, drawn to etched 
cordial glasses or Fire-King Jadeite dishes 
like magpies. Some might collect in order to 
demonstrate their taste or communicate an 
identification with an aesthetic, but in the 
end, they are all trophies of consumption 
once they’re put on display. 

Keith Kreeger, on the other hand, doesn’t 
want his work placed on a mantle. He wants 
fresh blooms popped into bud vases, plat- 
ters passed around tables, forks scraping on 
plates as laughter and conversation fill 
space. Kreeger’s work, with its stark white 
simplicity and signature hard, incised lines, 
is appropriate for both taco Tuesdays at 
home and a splashy night at Qui. In the 
process, he’s helping to document Austin’s 
current dining culture. 

“The irony of what I do now is that I never 
liked making plates,” recalls Kreeger in the 
showroom of his studio at the Eastside 
Canopy artists’ complex. “I would make serv- 
ing bowls and all these things around the 


ritual of dining, but I hated getting dinner- 
ware orders. It wasn’t something I enjoyed. 
Turns out, as an artist, it’s a new process and 
a new way for me to explore my work.” 

Born and raised in New York, it wasn’t 
until Kreeger was studying for a bachelor’s 
in American studies at Skidmore College 
that he discovered his knack for clay. 
Opting to stick around for the summer, he 
wound up spending entire days in the 
ceramics studio. He decided to add a ceram- 
ics minor to his portfolio, allowing him to 
work with Toshiko Takaezu, the Japanese 
artist whose abstract ceramic sculptures 
contributed to the legitimization of ceram- 


“Dining is community and an experience 
that you share with others. I want my work 
to be used, and the best way to use my work 
is to put food on it. ” - Keith Kreeger 


ics in fine art. After graduation, Kreeger 
and his Houston-native wife, Evangelina, 
relocated to Cape Cod, where they ran a gal- 
lery from 1998 until 2009. That’s when, as it 
often does to its native children, Texas 
beckoned. What he couldn’t have known 
was that this move would be the bellwether 
of his career. 

“We moved to Austin just when the cur- 
rent [restaurant] explosion was starting,” 
says Kreeger. “La Condesa had just opened, 
Uchiko was about to open, there was this 
vibrancy of ‘new’ happening right when we 
moved here. That inspired my work. I 
wasn’t trying to work with restaurants, I 
was realizing that restaurant customers 
were my customers. I realized that every- 


one who bought my work and served on 
these pieces understood the concept that it 
doesn’t just matter what you’re serving and 
where you’re getting your food from, but 
what you’re serving it on matters too.” 

It didn’t take long for Kreeger’s aesthetic 
to gain traction. When Paul Qui opened his 
lauded restaurant in 2013, he asked Kreeger 
to make the dishware, a relationship that 
remains in place today as the restaurant 
transitions to a tastings-only menu served 
on what Kreeger describes as a “deductive 
bento box.” More relationships bloomed 
from there. Chef Shawn Cirkiel asked 
Kreeger to make the water pitchers for his 
recently opened. Southwestern-themed 
chavez in the Downtown Radisson. 

“At chavez, we wanted to be very con- 
scious of a sense of place, and more than 
anything, to tell a story, so we tried to utilize 
a lot of materials and textures and artisans 
to help us tell the story of being a Texas 
restaurant and what it means to be from 
Austin,” explains Cirkiel. “We very much 
wanted to have a sense of warmth with the 
water pitchers and a sense of coming into 
our environment to share, not just a glass 
pitcher. What we asked Keith to do was 
come up with the pitchers based on our col- 
ors and shapes and all the different design 
features that we utilize through the whole 
space.” Instead of nondescript stainless 
steel or glass pitchers, the chavez dining 
room is salted with elegant vessels incised 
with delicate red slashes - an unmistakably 
Kreeger touch. They help lend the sleek, 
pecan-walled dining room the feel of visit- 
ing the home of a very rich friend. 

Just as Kreeger’s 
work lends restau- 
rants a sense of 
place - look for 
Kreeger’s votives 
in a regionally 
identified restau- 
rant with a high- 
profile fall opening 
- the sense of place 



lends itself to his 
work. “My work 
definitely got 
cleaner and more 
contemporary 
after moving 
here,” he says. “I 
think that was responding to being in a city 
that was growing and had so much cool 
architecture going up.” 

Austin’s imprint on Kreeger’s work and 
its resultant role in the city’s dynamic din- 
ing scene will someday tell the story of 
this moment in our culture. Scholar 
Marcie Cohen Ferris writes in The ‘Stuff 
of Southern Food that “the evidence of 
how and what people ate is an important 


material expression of ... economic and 
cultural transformation.” One could argue 
that restaurants’ use of Kreeger’s distinc- 
tive work, which melds traditional meth- 
ods with contemporary minimalism, 
marks the moment in which Austin dining 
arrived in the big leagues. 

For Kreeger, though, his success is a 
reflection of the sharing economy among 
seemingly disparate groups. “There’s a lot 
of collaboration between groups that you 
wouldn’t expect would talk to each other. 
Tech talks to photography, art talks to 
chefs, and so on,” he says. “Coming from 
the Northeast, I wasn’t used to that. 
Everyone has their version of Austin, 
whether it’s old or new or now or whatever, 
but I feel like people are willing to share 
and connect and trade favors more than 
anywhere I’ve seen before.” 

The result of all of this collaboration has 
been success upon success. In addition to 
his restaurant presence, Kreeger’s work has 
been used in contexts both swanky and 
quirky, from private dinners during SXSW 
to backyard tiki parties. Kreeger has recent- 
ly completed a set of old-fashioned tum- 
blers and shot glasses to give away as part 
of a Barman’s Fund charity event on August 
25. Austin filmmaker Rob Thomas even 
used a few pieces of Kreeger’s work in the 
Veronica Mars movie. 

Ultimately, Kreeger is concerned with 
creating memorable dining experiences 
through his work. “Dining is community 
and an experience that you share with oth- 
ers,” he says. “I want my work to be used, 
and the best way to use my work is to put 
food on it. 

“I’m trying to make 
stuff that matters, that 
I’m happy with, and 
has a context. If I can 
get it in that right con- 
text, which for me is 
dining and the experi- 
ence of living in com- 
munity, I’m happy. 
Whether that context is 
someone’s home where 
every night a family of 
five is eating off my 
wares, that’s humbling. 
If it’s a restaurant set- 
ting where every night 
300 people are going 
through and using my 
work, it’s incredibly 
humbling also.” 

This is not to say 
that Kreeger’s work is 
not art. Witness the 
transformation the 
plates from Qui that 
were too chipped to keep in the dinner ser- 
vice rotation: Peelander Yellow painted his 
signature weirdo images on them, and then 
they were auctioned off as art pieces for 
charity. Once the plates were too used up to 
be functional, they shifted to collectible 
Americana, imbued with commensal experi- 
ence, documents of a specific cultural 
moment in a specific place. It’s hard to imag- 
ine a higher purpose for a humble dish. ■ 


3S THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE AUGUSTS, 2014 austinchronicle.com 


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austinchronicle.com AUGUST8,2014 the Austin CHRONICLE 39 










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Second to Naan 

DAAWArS SOUTHERN INDIAN EXCELS UP NORTH 



Daawat, which means “feast,” has 
been open a couple of years, replacing 
what used to be my favorite subconti- 
nental restaurant, Indian Spicy 
Kitchen. When asked what happened 
to the previous tenant, my server told 
me, “the Nepalese food was too spicy 
for Austin.” That’s ironic since “spicy” 
was in the name, so customers should 
have had a clue what to expect. It had 
a perfect spice level for me, but they 
retooled with a different menu, focus- 
ing more on the foods of the south, 
leaving the elevations of Nepal far 
behind. They kept just enough of the 
standard Indian dishes on the menu to 
keep the rookies happy, but down 
south is where it’s at now; think 
Andhra Pradesh, Tamil Nadu, Mysore- 
Bangalore, Kerala, Goa, etc. 

Daawat is located on the southeast 
corner of Parmer and 1-35, due north 
of the H-E-B gas pumps. Bollywood 
videos play on multiple fiat screens in 
the comfortable and welcoming space. 

The buffet runs in front of the kitchen 
along the west side. We sampled the 
spread on the first visit, which draws a 
crowd of programmers from nearby 
computer firms. In fact, we were the 
only ones without security badges 
around our necks. 

The buffet lineup featured 20 items for 
$10.99. Favorites included a deeply flavor- 
ful, dark and spicy Chettinad-style goat 
curry; a melt-in-your-mouth Mughlai malai 
chicken curry with yogurt, cream, and saf- 
fron; an Andhra masala-based natu kodi 
curry with chicken, poppy seeds, and 
Guntur chile; a “chicken wing masala” coat- 
ed with red chile paste, curry leaf, and other 
goodies; and an intriguing warm Keralan 
banana payasam dessert with milk, carda- 


mom, cashews, and coconut. The buffet 
stands out because of constant replenish- 
ment. Items are brought out in small quan- 
tities, so they get refilled frequently and 
keep fresh. There are also some nonstan- 
dard Indian buffet dishes, which is refresh- 
ing. Every dish tastes unique, with a nice 
level of piquancy. Best of all, they bring the 
blistering hot, bubbly naan straight from 
the tandoor to your table, instead of leaving 
it to go stale on the buffet. 

On a return visit, I had to try their 
Chicken 65 ($6.99), a thickly coated bone- 


less Tamil dish with spice paste and gram 
(chickpea) flour, deep fried, and tossed 
with chiles and curry leaf. I’m addicted to 
this appetizer and could eat it by the buck- 
et. The catfish pulusu ($11.99), an Andhra 
curry gravy on marinated catfish steaks, 
with pureed caramelized onion, tamarind, 
turmeric, chile, and curry leaf, was deli- 
cious enough to spoon like soup. The 
Bhagara Baigan ($8.99) was another win- 
ner, a Hyderabad/Andhra thick curry of 
baby eggplant with a spicy peanut-sesame 
paste. The eggplant tasted great, but the 
curry, eaten as a dip with the perfect garlic 
naan, is even better. The Mysore Masala 
Dosa ($7.99), a delectable South Indian rice 
crepe that’s golden brown, crisp on the 
outside and soft-textured on the inside, is 
filled with potato palya with hot spice pow- 
der. It’s a vegetarian treat when dipped 
into the coconut chutney and vegetable 
samhar. Their naan is first-rate, puffed up 
on top, lightly 
charred on the 
bottom, and 
loaded with cara- 
melized garlic 
($2.49) and cara- 
melized onion 
($2.99 for the 
onion kulcha). 

The one dish 
that didn’t knock 
me out was the 
chile-garlic hakka noodles ($7.99), but I 
didn’t really expect it to. Tossed with a 
Sichuan sauce and stir-fried with carrot, 
cabbage, onion, garlic, and peas, it’s really 
not that bad. But it is there to appease the 
bland, “I can’t eat spicy” fried rice and 
noodle crowd, and offer amends for the 
dearly departed Nepalese grub. Bring that 
super spicy oddball stuff back pronto, I say. 
It would meld perfectly with the fantastic, 
spicy, no-compromise southern-style spe- 
cialties that Daawat is turning out now. 

- Mick Vann 


Daawat 
Indian Cuisine 

500 W. Canyon 
Ridge Ste. 275-L, 
512/828-6909 
Mon.-Thu., llam-2pm; 
Fri., llam-2:30pm; 
Sat.-Sun., 11:30am- 
3pm; daily, 5-lOpm 
www.daawataustin.com 



Mobile? 

So are we. Take us with you. 


austinchronicle.com/m C 



40 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE AUGUST8,2014 austinchronicle.com 











THE REALITIES OF VIRTUAL REALITY 


FILM LISTINGS 






m 



Fast, Cheap, and in Control 

ROGER GORMAN: AN AFS TRIBUTE TO A WILD ANGEL byLouisBlack 



AFS ARTHOUSE: 

THE FILMS OF ROGER GORMAN 


Roger Gorman’s reputation as a film- 
maker precedes him. More than simply 
the “King of the Bs,” Gorman was also 
known as the “Pope of Pop Gulture.” 
Friday, the Austin Film Society kicks off 
a miniseries of four Gorman films that 
will run on Friday nights and Sunday 
afternoons throughout August. 

Devoted to cheap filmmaking, but 
boasting an unquenchable cinematic 
vision, Roger Gorman turned out com- 
mercially produced Hollywood films - 
often on the kinds of schedules and 
budgets that make other indie produc- 
tions seem to be traveling by limo 
while he was hoofing it. 

In 15 years - between 1955 and 
1970 - Gorman directed approximately 
50 films including Teenage Doll, Bloody 
Mama, The Little Shop of Horrors, The 
Trip, Gas-s-s-s, and a cycle of films 
based on Edgar Allan Poe stories. By 
1959, when Gorman made A Bucket of 
Blood (the second Gorman film in the 
AFS series), he had already directed 
22 films. It was made for $50,000 in 
five days (which shaved one day off his 
previous production record). 

A good example of Gorman’s vision- 
ary thrift can be found in The Terror. In 
1963 while finishing The Raven, anoth- 
er of his Poe films, Gorman realized 
that the production was running ahead 
of schedule. Rather than leave the set 
idle for a couple of days, he commis- 
sioned a script that would be ready to 
shoot in two weeks, hired Boris Karloff 
for two days, and planned to fill out 
the screen time with an unknown actor 
named Jack Nicholson. The film was 
supposed to shoot in two days. Nine 
months later, after being worked on by 
a true rogue’s gallery of mostly young 
directors - Francis Ford Goppola, 

Monte Heilman, Dennis Jakob, Jack 
Hill, and even Nicholson - The Terror 
was released. 

Gorman was, however, every bit as 
influential a producer as he was a 
director. Films released by New World, 
his company from 1970 to 1983, are 
among my most cherished. His great- 
est fame is as a nurturer of an almost 
unreasonable percentage of the next 
couple of generations of film talent. 

Gorman paid as little as he could 
get away with, both for talent and pro- 
duction. Famously, he would give some 
young director his first shot at a film, 
then halve the budget the day before 
shooting began, knowing that the des- 


That Guy Dick Miller: Aug. 8, 7:30pm 

follow the screening. 


perate director would make sure it 
happened. Still, so many people 
worked for him, often on multiple 
films, that the deal clearly benefited 
both sides. They didn’t just get their 
break from Gorman, they learned how 
to make movies from him. Among the 
directors getting their start with 
Gorman were Goppola, Heilman, 

Martin Scorsese, Jonathan Kaplan, 
Jonathan Demme, John Sayles (as a 
scriptwriter), Joe Dante, James 
Gameron, Peter Bogdanovich, and Ron 
Howard. Actors include Nicholson, 
Bruce Dern, Sylvester Stallone, Talia 
Shire, Ellen Burstyn, Robert De Niro, 
and Sandra Bullock. There are writers, 
cinematographers, producers, and oth- 
ers as well. 


- A Skype interview with Dick Miller will 


Gorman created a fascinating cine- 
ma, always ambitious, often brusquely 
adolescent but also sometimes sur- 
prisingly mature, which predicted the 
next few generations of certain film 
genres. His cinematic sensibility born 
of low-budget necessities - telling fast, 
ever-moving stories shot with a certain 
intimacy and visual immediacy - has 
become mainstream. 

The Austin Film Society’s series 
opens with the documentary That Guy 
Dick Miller about the important charac- 
ter actor who appears in almost all 
Gorman’s movies and many of those of 
his progeny (Demme once told me that 
casting Miller was considered a good- 
luck talisman). The film made its world 
premiere at SXSW. ■ 


A Bucket of Blood: Aug. 8, 10pm; Aug. 10, 2pm - A wild and crazy beatnik horror film, 
this is a hipster black comedy, flaunting its cheapness and featuring Miller at his finest. 

The Pit and the Pendulum: Aug. 15, 10pm, Aug. 17, 2 pm - Vincent Price in one 
of the best of the Poe films. 

X: The Man With the X~Ray Eyes: Aug. 22, 10pm; Aug. 24, 2pm - Gorman’s 
obsession with eyes and seeing reaches its pinnacle in this science-fiction 
masterpiece starring Ray Milland. 

Gas-s-s-s: Aug. 29, 8pm; Aug. 31, 2pm - U.S. politics, film style, and Gorman’s pas- 
sion for filmmaking all come crashing down at the end of the Sixties in George 
Armitage’s rendering of the pop apocalypse. 

Screenings are on Fridays and Sundays at the Marchesa Haii & Theatre. 

Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 



Ciittii^ Hitch Down to Size 

INSIDE MONDO’S NEW COLLECTIBLES LINE 

Alfred Hitchcock famously treated his actresses like living 
dolls, micromanaging their looks down to the exact shade of 
(icy) bottle blond and pushing them to their physical and emo- 
tional limits (Tippi Hedren, for one, went briefly catatonic after 
a particularly punishing day on The Birds set). Turnabout, as 
they say, is fair play, and soon enough you’ll have the chance 
to subject a sixth-scale Hitch to all kinds of horrors ... or you 
could just give him a place of pride on the mantle and marvel 
at how gosh-durn cool he is. 

Tiny, toy Hitch comes courtesy of Mondo, the Austin-based 
art gallery and online purveyor of posters, T-shirts, and other 
pop-culture miscellany. Mondo has been quietly contemplating 
a move into collectibles since 2010, GEO Justin Ishmael 
relates, but the wheels kicked into (secret) high gear this 
past year. “[It wasn’t] necessarily like, Jock the door and turn 
up the music, we’re talking about toys right now’ - it wasn’t 
that type of secrecy,” Ishmael says. “But it was something 
that we really wanted to debut the correct way, which I think 
was at San Diego Gomic-Gon.” 

Last month, the Mondo team arrived at Gomic-Gon ’s Exhibit 
Hall to show off a hand-painted Hitchcock prototype, as well as 
a 16-inch Iron Giant figure based on files from the 1999 film 
(“completely screen-accurate ... very intricate, highly detailed, 
lots of articulation”) and vinyl Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 
inspired by the original comics, rather than the more widely 
known Nineties animated version. The reception, from both 
fans and other collectible makers, was great, Ishmael reports. 

Tweaks are still being made to the Hitchcock prototype, 
which has been approved by the filmmaker’s estate. (Ishmael 
hopes to start taking preorders by the end of 2014 or early 
2015.) “There are little things we want to change here and 
there. One of the ideas we had was - since this is a sixth- 
scale figure scaled down from a real person - we’re going to 
email his estate and ask for his measurements for his suit, 
because we’re going to try to replicate his suit. That means if 
he has a size-52 jacket, we’ll make a smaller size-52 jacket 
and then essentially fill him up to where his actual girth, his 
actual shape would be represented properly.” 

Truth be told, prototype Hitch does seem a little slim in 
the picture. 

“It’s very flattering, yes. We’re going to chubby him up a lit- 
tle bit. ... That’s just one of the fun things about toys that I 
never thought would happen - the kind of problem-solving 
that you have to do.” 

With the flagship line, Ishmael stressed that they wanted 
to show diversity. But more importantly, a Mondo toy has to 
meet a simple criterion: “Basically, anything that’s cool. 
Anything that we’re fans of and that makes sense, that we 
think that you guys would like, too.” - Kimberley Jones 


Next week is Hitchcock Week at the Paramount Summer 
Classic Film Series! Ten films from the Master of Suspense 
screen Aug. 12-17 at the Paramount and sister venue Stateside. 
See Special Screenings, p.66, for the lineup. 


austinchronicle.com AUGUST 8, 2014 the Austin chronicle 41 









Turns out that in the same way reading a 
book in a car can make some people sick is 
also true in virtual reality. When your eyes 
perceive stillness and yet your body feels 
acceleration and turns (as in a moving car 
or plane), sickness can follow. In VR, your 
eyes see movement and yet your body 
remains still. The effect can be jarring at 
first and nauseating soon after. The Oculus 
Rift website recommends developers pro- 
gram virtual movement no faster than 1.3 
meters per second, which is a hair slower 
than the average walking human. Not 
exactly the high-speed action that hardcore 
gamers might be used to. 

When Oculus Rift was making its first 
millions on Kickstarter back in August 
2012, word that virtual reality lived up to 
the hype was starting to spread. Gamers 
salivated as the day of living in their favor- 
ite worlds seemed to draw near. Two years 
on and the Oculus Rift still isn’t technically 
for sale to the public yet. If you’ve tried a 
Rift, then you’ve used what’s known as a 
development kit. It allows individuals and 
businesses to work on programs for the 
technology before the final product hits 
store shelves and online shopping carts. 
Hollyman recognizes that Ghost Machine’s 
sole focus on VR development is risky. “In 
effect we’re making records for a record- 
player technology that doesn’t exist in the 
marketplace yet.” 

And they’re not alone. A growing number 
of locals are betting on VR mania when the 
Oculus Rift is released, a date that has yet to 
be announced although is predicted for late 
this year or early 2015. Chalk up some of that 

continued onp.44 


Locals look into VR and see more than video games 


Driving down a dilapidated street, my car 
comes to a T in the road. I turn my head 
side to side; neither direction looks invit- 
ing. Run-down buildings loom over empty 
streets. Right seems as good a choice as 
any, and the wheels crush detritus as I go 
around the corner. I’m getting a feel for how 
the car handles now, but the road that 
appeared to continue to the horizon comes 
to an abrupt end. Without any signage or 
blockade, the lines on the street end with a 
drop into a ravine. The zombies I’m sup- 
posed to be mowing down must be in the 
other direction. The engine rumbles impa- 
tiently as I contemplate the craggy asphalt 
below. The undead will have to wait. I throw 
the car into reverse, putting space between 
me and the precipice before gunning it, fly- 
ing over the edge. My flight lasts mere sec- 
onds before taking a nosedive, and I plum- 
met to the rocks below. 

It’s awesome. 

□ 

I’m in a world created by a game develop- 
ment company called Ghost Machine. On 
the surface, it doesn’t seem all that unique. 
Games about zombies and cars are a dime a 
dozen. But a much-ballyhooed gadget has 
turned what might have been a humdrum 
experience into something much more. The 
Oculus Rift virtual reality headset takes 
environments off the screen and puts them 
on (some might say in) your head. Using the 
same technology found in the average smart- 
phone, the Rift tracks head orientation and 
renders 3-D worlds that surround users in 
360 degrees. The effect of the device ranges 
from jaw-dropping to unsettling. Wired 
declared on its June cover that the Rift 


would change everything from TV to sex to 
art, and Facebook’s $2 billion purchase of 
the company has only fueled the burning 
expectations for the tech even more. Whether 
that’s a hyperbolic characterization or astute 
prediction, there’s no denying that one’s 
initial Rift experience is acutely memorable. 

I remove the Oculus Rift headset after 
my Thelma & Louise-esque demise to find 
myself back in Ghost Machine’s Austin 
office. The pride of finding a unique way to 
die in the company’s game. Zombie Taxi 
Apocalypse, is tempered by beads of sweat 
on my brow and a slowly churning stomach. 


a sensation I associate with motion sick- 
ness. Yet, I haven’t moved an inch. Clearly 
the jump between reality and the post- 
apocalyptic world created by Neal Nellans 
has not left me unscathed. I tell Nellans and 
his business partner Burnes Hollyman that 
I need a second to let my body and brain 
realign before my next dive into an all- 
encompassing world. The duo are no strang- 
ers to this reaction. It’s an early lesson in 
making experiences for virtual reality: Few 
people last very long in a jet fighter, zoom- 
ing car, or speedy avatar’s shoes without 
getting a little woozy. 


This is the view from the cockpit in Ghost Machine's Final Burn. This is how images in the Ocuius Rift are 
seen on a standard screen. Why do screenshots of VR aiways iook like this? The two images - one for each 
eye - have slightly different perspectives to create the 3-D effect. The fish-eye warping is counteracted 
in the headset. Lenses create an image that seems to wrap around the eye. In other words^ this makes it 
more difficult to see the edge of the screen and creates environments that surround your field of vision. 


Plunging into the 
Oculus Rift at 
the University of 
Texas Visualization 
Laboratory (Vislab) 


V 





1 










If 





Hi d 



A j 


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The Realities of Virtual Reality 


MILLION-DOLLAR 

IDEAS 

Here are a few VR applications we overheard 
or came up with ourselves. 

3-D PRINT PREVIEW 

Don’t waste your 3-D printer’s time. Walk 
around your creation and get a sense of its 
actual size before committing real-world 
resources to making it a reality. 

DRIVE-IN 

Get that old-timey drive-in vibe, and, with 
enough coding, maybe add a date to the expe- 
rience. Any tactile feedback to your physical 
advances will have to be supplied by the user. 

HANDLESS E-READER 

Turn pages by tilting your head to the left or 
right. Perfect for disabled or injured individu- 
als. Or forgo the book altogether and have a 
virtual Morgan Freeman or Judi Dench read 
you to sleep. 

PORN 

What happens in virtual reality stays 
in virtual reality. 

ACTUAL VIRTUAL TOURS 

Walk around a house before you buy it. Look 
over your office building’s atrium before con- 
structing it. Architects can give clients “walk- 
ing” tours of spaces they’ve only imagined. 


42 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE AUGUST 8, 2014 austinchronicle.com 







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austinchronicle.com AUGUST 8, 2014 the Austin chronicle 43 














THE REALITIES OF VIRTUAL REALITY continued from pA2 



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OTHER NOTABLE 
LOCAL VR 
PROJECTS 

Shark Punch 

Chaotic Moon fulfills the near-universal fan- 
tasy of punching an attacking shark in the 
face and watching it explode from the 
impact. It is a deeply rewarding experience. 

Verde Station 

The Rift offers a real sense of isolation as 
developer Duelboot lets you step into the 
shoes of the lone inhabitant of a space sta- 
tion. Are the strange occurrences happening 
around you real or have you been cooped up 
in space too long? 

Stargazer at the End of Time 

Take a gander at the night sky, create your 
own constellations, and let the universe 
wow you courtesy of local developers David 
Kalina and Jason Rosenstock. 

Faceted Fiight 

Get in the cockpit and enjoy the lo-fi forests 
and mountains. The game forgoes speed 
and thrills for a gentler, more precise ride. 

Aaaaacuius! 

How could leaping off a building and avoid- 
ing obstacles on the way down not be fun? 
Owichemy Labs adapted this from their PC 
game, but the Rift adds a whole other 
dimension, both figuratively and literally. 

Eden River 

Unello Design invites you to take a trip 
down a lazy river and let the majestic trees 
and sun-dappled rocks float by. A soothing 
jam subtly guides you downstream as you 
make a few animal friends in your travels. 

Omni Treadmiii 

This omnidirectional treadmill replaces the 
usual controller for movement within a virtu- 
al environment. Slick shoes and a concave 
bowl re-create the sensation of walking and 
reproduce your “movement” in the game 
world. It’s another big step toward biofeed- 
back and deeper immersion. 




excitement to the fact that the rules of VR 
design are largely unwritten. No one knows 
how the tech can or will be used. But there 
are more than a few good ideas out there. 

□ 

The University of Texas Visualization 
Laboratory (yislab) goes big. It has a mas- 
sive wall of hi-def screens, a touch screen 
the size of a table, and computing power 
that makes big data shake in its boots. But 
Oculus Rift’s relatively tiny headset struck 
Luis Francisco-Revilla and Heriberto Nieto 
as a perfect fit for their lab, which uses tech- 
nology to help professors and students 
present data in uniquely useful ways. As 
Francisco-Revilla puts it, “Our job is to help 
get the output of our supercomputer into 
the heads of people.” It wasn’t long after 
receiving their Rift that English professor 
Janine Barchas walked into the lab with 
What Jane Saw. What better name for a 
project to pair with a device offering a first- 
person perspective? 

The titular Jane would turn out to be 
Jane Austen. Don’t get too invested in a 
cyber Mr. Darcy dancing you around a ball- 
room though. While fun, the educational 
value of a nice country dance from the 
Regency era is negligible. Barchas instead 
came to the Vislab with a re-creation of 
what many consider the greatest art exhibi- 
tion of Austen’s era: the portraits of Sir 
Joshua Reynolds. She had meticulously 
arranged them as Austen saw them; the 
paintings placed in relation to their sub- 
jects’ fame, prestige, and relationships to 
one another. After all the research required 
to achieve the re-creation of the 1813 exhibi- 
tion, Barchas naturally wanted her labor to 
be seen by as many people as possible. The 
Vislab’s latest toy offered a hook, and 
Barchas didn’t hesitate: “If we can make 
Jane Austen more sexy, and make her 
Regency world with its emphasis on celeb- 
rity culture and its emergence of modern 
material culture seem more palpable, then 
I’ve won.” 


UT’s Center for the Study of Ancient Italy 
has also gotten in on the virtual action. As 
Michael Thomas works on-site at Oplontis 
- a town near Pompeii covered in ash by 
Mount Vesuvius and excavated in the mid- 
dle of the last century - Vislab manager 
Nieto is helping to create a fully immersive 
model of one of the villas. The team hopes 
to have a faithful re-creation of the 
25,000-square-foot structure and offer users 
the option to explore the structure as it 
stands now and how it looked during the 
reign of the Roman Empire. Francisco- 
Revilla hopes to take the project even fur- 
ther by simulating people to give a sense of 
population density and how different social 
classes interacted at the time. 

The Vislab’s future plans for virtual real- 
ity integration include ventures with the 
School of Architecture, rendering buildings 
that can be walked around and through. 
Nieto and Francisco-Revilla will also work 
with the neuroscience department to study 
how the brain perceives virtual environ- 
ments vs. the real world. This research, in 
particular, might interest developers work- 
ing in the medium who continue to experi- 
ment with people’s eyes and brains through 
trial and error. 

□ 

Robin Arnott enjoys getting in people’s 
heads. His previous project. Deep Sea, 
involves a gas mask, joystick, an invisible 
sea monster, and a breath monitor - all in 
service of freaking players out. Deep Sea 
creates immersion through sensory depri- 
vation, and it’s unnerving, to put it mildly. 
Arnott’ s current project, SoundSelf, also 
seeks deep immersion, but to an entirely 
different end. This time around, the goal is 
to manipulate the senses to achieve a 
trancelike state. Using the Oculus Rift and 
a microphone, SoundSelf encourages long, 
sustained chanting by the player and 
translates those sounds into abstract audio 
and visual feedback. By monitoring the 
rhythm, timbre, and pitch of your voice 


44 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE AUGUSTS, 2014 austinchronicle.com 








SoundSelf looks for subtle changes and 
alters the feedback to bring you deeper 
into the experience. He says, “It’s really 
important to me that this feel like a con- 
versation, that SoundSelf feels like a liv- 
ing entity conversing with you, dancing 
with you.” 

SoundSelf breaks one of the cardinal 
rules of virtual reality: It doesn’t follow the 
motion of your head. The swirling and 
vibrating images remain directly in your 
line of sight no matter 
where you look. But creat- 
ing a realistic world was 
never Arnott’s goal. The 
purpose is not to explore 
things around you, but to 
find transcendence with- 
in. He wants to help you 
turn off your brain in 
order to achieve a distrac- 
tionless appreciation for 
the present moment. 

SoundSelf was original- 
ly designed for tablets. 

This was before Arnott 
caught the Oculus bug. “As soon as I 
learned about the Oculus Rift, it changed 
overnight from an iPad project to a virtual 
reality project,” Arnott admits. “With 
SoundSelf, because the entire interaction is 
between your perception and your imagina- 
tion, it’s extremely important that I have a 
really high-bandwidth plug into your 
brain.” Sure, TV and computer screens are 


great, but when those screens hug your face 
and you put on headphones, the outside 
world disappears. When that happens, 
SoundSelf s ecstatic tendrils can truly mas- 
sage your mind. 

□ 

The Oculus Rift isn’t the only virtual kid 
on the block. Sony announced Project 
Morpheus earlier this year, but it requires a 
PlayStation4 ($400), and that’s a significant 
barrier to entry. The Rift’s compatibility 
with most existing PCs 
gives it a significantly 
larger consumer base. 
Oculus-like visors are 
already hitting the mar- 
ket that allow you to drop 
in an ordinary smart- 
phone and get a virtual 
reality experience for a 
fraction of the price. 
Google also threw its hat 
into the ring, releasing 
instructions for making 
Cardboard: a cell phone- 
holding headset that you 
can make out of - you guessed it - card- 
board. It was a half-joke, but it worked, and 
the punch line might as well be: “Virtual 
reality is closer than you think.” With the 
App Store and Google Play a mere tap or 
swipe away, the infrastructure for distribu- 
tion is built in, and there are few things 
consumers like more than convenience. 
The main limitation with smartphones is 


It's on early lesson in 
making experiences 
for virtual reality: Few 
people last very long in 
a jet fighter, zooming 
car, or speedy avatar’s 
shoes without getting 
a little woozy. 



mm’s AUiTiii-eiiiTMe 


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OSXSWfm 



their processing power, which pales in 
comparison to the average PC. Regardless 
of who comes out on top or who flounders, 
the takeaway is that VR is gaining traction, 
and businesses and consumers are 
intrigued with the possibilities. For now, 
developers will have to guess which virtual 
experiences the public will embrace and 
which will be rejected, but it’s only a matter 
of time. 

The reality of virtual reality grows closer. 
As I write this, the second generation 
Oculus Rift development kits are landing 
on doorsteps. They promise increased reac- 
tion time to head orientation that will, in 
theory, lessen motion sickness. Their 
Development Kit 2 also boasts new head- 
tracking capabilities that allow you to not 
only look down at your feet while standing 
on a cliff but to lean forward and peer over 
into the abyss. If you want to know what’s 
down there, you’ll have to take the leap. ■ 



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More than a club, Antone’s remains monument to a man 
whose belief in low-down, 12-bar blues and respect for the 
good souls from whom it poured became so contagious that 
the venue evolved into both a museum and incubator for the 
genre. Clifford Antone opened his namesake nightclub on 
Sixth Street in 1975 and operated it until his death in 2006. 
Four decades later, it’s still the most globally recognized live 
music brand in Austin. 

Even if the “Home of the Blues” is homeless. 

Seven months have now passed since Antone’s hoisted 
the flag one final time at its short-lived East Riverside loca- 
tion for New Year’s Eve with first son Doyle Bramhall II. By 
the time its 39th anniversary rolled around on July 15, the 
Chronicle, whose bond with Clifford and his sister Susan 
Antone could only be characterized as instantly familial, had 
investigated the matter thoroughly enough to know there 
would be no party because there wasn’t a home for it or, for 
that matter, a proper set of hosts to throw it. New ownership 
of Antone’s, which had taken over from former Emo’s baron 
Frank Hendrix, had stalled out on the reopening without 
explanation or update. 

Enter two native sons - and finally a reason to cel- 
ebrate: Grammy-winning blues savior Gary Clark 
Jr. and Arlyn Studios/ Lamberts dynamo 
Will Bridges, who’ve helped rebuild team 
Antone’s. Ready for a fresh chapter in the 
club’s legend, with a key location to go 
with it? Both are on the way. 

The blues room, which through the 
ages hosted greats including Jimmy 
Rodgers, Albert King, Eddie Taylor, 

Muddy Waters, Albert Collins, B.B. 

King, John Lee Hooker, Freddie King, 
and Buddy Guy, while helping expose 
homegrown acts like the Fabulous 
Thunderbirds, Stevie Ray Vaughan, and Gary 
Clark Jr., has jumped around town throughout its ten- 
ure. After Sixth and Brazos, it moved up to Anderson Lane, 
down to Guadalupe and 29th, over to West Fifth and Lavaca, 
and finally east of the highway for its last year. There, 
Antone’s bookended the same block as Emo’s after Hendrix 
took over its operation in 2010. 

Once he sold Emo’s to Charles Attal and C3 Presents, 
next went Antone’s, bought by a conglomerate of investors. Led 
by famous geneticist and explorer Dr. Spencer Wells, the 
group closed a deal on the brand, but not the building. They 
were eager to return the club Downtown and forecast an unveil- 
ing in March for South by Southwest. That never materialized. 

“The partnership fell apart,” confirmed Wells in person last 
Thursday. Two partners pulled out of the deal a few months 
in, while another rescinded his interests shortly after the pur- 
chase. “They just decided it wasn’t a good match.” 

Although the partnership fallout was problematic. Wells 
reveals it was no cakewalk structuring a deal initially. Reworking 
contracts and finding financial agreement with Hendrix and his 
business partner Stewart Bates proved no easy task. Wells, 
renowned as the “Indiana Jones of genetics,” had wrested a 
sacred artifact from a dog-eat-dog businessman, but the 


Gary Clark Jr. at the X Games in June 

Lubbock-raised, Washington, D.C.-based true believer couldn’t 
deliver without boots on the ground locally. Enter Bridges, co- 
owner of Arlyn, Lamberts, and Deep Eddy Cabaret. 

Bridges was the first person to have Antone’s under exclu- 
sive contract from Hendrix, but couldn’t find agreement on a 
sales figure and walked away. While he’d moved the ball up the 
field. Wells’ group got the goal. After his partnership shakeup. 
Wells reached out to Bridges and the two mustered the trust to 
share information and resources. 

Both were hesitant, especially Bridges, grappling with his 
moral duty of assisting a music institution he loved against 


o 

D 

D 


O 


:o 


spreading himself too thin since he’d just acquired Deep Eddy 
in April. Come summer, he disclosed his potential new 
involvement in Antone’s to his friend Gary Clark Jr., who 
inspired Bridges to put his full spirit into the club by relating 
what it meant to him and other musicians in Austin. Bridges, 
in turn, proposed Clark join the team. 

“Antone’s is my foundation,” stated Clark via a midnight 
phone call as this issue went to press. “I wouldn’t be doing 
what I’m doing if it hadn’t been for Antone’s. It allowed me to 
experiment, explore, and try to better myself as a musician.” 
At 15, the guitarist first performed at the club alongside 
blues all-stars Hubert Sumlin, Pinetop Perkins, James 
Cotton, Calvin "Fuzz” Jones, and more. 

“I already loved to play, but when I jumped onstage at 
Antone’s, I felt like I was part of something important. At 15, 
everyone wants to feel like they’re part of something cool, but 
I felt like I was part of something cooler than anybody could 
ever imagine at my age. It changed the way I thought about 
life and ended my search for acceptance because I knew this 
was what I was supposed to do.” 

After he got offstage that night, Clifford gave Clark a blues- 
man benediction: “You got something, kid.” 

Clark’s involvement now exemplifies the new, locally 
sourced participants in a project that was initially dominated 
by out-of-town partners. Despite his international rock star 
stature at 30, another local blues figure’s blessing measures 
equally potent. Wells confirms that he took extra care to 
ensure Susan Antone was appropriately compensated during 
the sale, and thus she’s the fourth partner. 

“I’m so excited about having Will and Gary involved,” 
enthuses the brand’s surviving namesake. “Cliff really cared 
for Gary, and I know he’s looking down and applauding. It’s 
important for the whole experience to have true Austin people 
working with Antone’s.” 

The task at hand for the new team is securing a space to 
resurrect the blues kingdom. Spencer Wells confirms they’re 
currently making serious inquiries into locations in the central 
business district, good news considering the club’s two most 
forgettable eras have been the time it spent in a rug ware- 
house on Anderson and the recent stand on Riverside. When 
asked what styles Antone’s will feature. Wells didn’t hesitate. 
“Blues! It needs to be ‘Home of the Blues’ again.” 

Without a home, Antone’s has couch surfed. The club’s 
mainstay, guitarist Derek O’Brien (revisit “Chairman of the 
Board,” April 25), revived the orphaned Monday blues jam at 
Midway Field House, former home of Antone’s most recent 
incarnation. Bridges sums up the situation. 

“One of the things that makes Austin interesting as a city 
is its landscape,” he says. “You have key landmarks, like the 
lake and Capitol. Things that provide context. Places like 
Dallas and Houston, you never really feel like you’ve arrived 
because they lack those landmarks. 

“A music culture also has a landscape, and if you don’t have 
landmarks that give context, you don’t know where you are, why 
you’re there, where you’re supposed to be going, and it all seems 
meaningless. When you can set your compass by something, it 
gives you direction. Antone’s became that beacon for the blues. 

“We, as a city, are now inundated with growth and money 
and other cultures, so we’re trying to find ourselves in the 
shuffle again and rediscover that original context. In order to 
do that, we feel we’ve got to bring Antone’s back as a beacon 
that allows others to set their compass.” 

Antone’s resurrection means more to Austin than just club 
space. This city needs one more midsized venue like it needs 
another taco truck. What’s important, in this time of tremen- 
dous change, remains real connection to the city’s musical 
heritage and the continuation of Clifford Antone’s mission. 

“I think that’s what people think about when they say 
Antone’s, or the nightclub, or me,” Clifford declared in Dan 
Karlok’s 2004 documentary Antonets: Home of the Blues. 
“We represent the real working musicians.” 

A home isn’t judged by location or who holds the mortgage. 
It’s defined by the people inside. ■ 


austinchronicle.com AUGUST 8, 2014 the Austin chronicle 47 






REVIEWS 


Crazy From the Heat 

Texas Platters go mondo 

The Chronicle now averages 400-500 local submissions a year. We review about two- 
thirds. These 4,000-plus words of critique? One mail crate of Austin releases right off the 
top. The B-side, another bin of aspiring Austinites, now steps on deck. Stay tuned for the 
second half of 2014 “Texas Platters.” 

- Raoul Hernandez 


★★★★★ PERFECT ★★★★ GREAT ★★★ GOOD ★★ MEDIOCRE ★ COASTER 



Billy Joe Shaver 

Long in the Tooth (Lightning Rod) 

No coincidence that with Willie Nelson top- 
ping charts for the first time in decades, Billy 
Joe Shaver shows up with his first album of 
new material since 2007’s Everybody's Broth- 
er. After all, Nelson’s Band of Brothers stars 
two new Shaver cuts, “The Git Go” and “Hard 
to Be an Outlaw,” both featured by Shaver on 
his Long in the Tooth, the latter song leading 
off the LP in duet with Nelson. Shaver har- 
bors no shortage of contempt for the state of 
country music, and thus continues firing 
shots at it, but the triumph of Tooth is far 
more personal. Here’s Shaver the irascible 
honky-tonk hero, older but no less ornery, 
turning from a decade’s work that focused 

more inward and heavenward following the deaths of his mother, wife, and son. Like “Hard 
to Be an Outlaw,” the title track still wrestles mortality, but with a snarl instead of senti- 
mentality against the jagged. Jaw-harped rhythm. “The Git Go” borders on fury in Shaver’s 
raw drawl and yelp, while “Checkers and Chess” kicks at a rigged system, and “Last Call 
for Alcohol” sloshes across the dance floor with a cackle. Train tune “Sunbeam Special” 
and closer “Music City USA” both Jangle as up-tempo thumpers to slower numbers like the 
touching waltz “I’ll Love You as Much as I Can” and superb ballad “American Me.” Finally, 
“I’m in Love” surprises with its swooning - if out of place - arrangement. Billy Joe Shaver, 
74, came into this world rough around the edges, so his songwriting resonates with 
unmatched autobiographical intensity and Long in the Tooth follows suit. Contrary to the 
album title, he ain’t headed for pasture anytime soon. 

★★★★ - Doug Freeman 


Centro-matic 

Take Pride in Your 
Long Odds (Navigational 
Transmissions/ 

Thirty Tigers) 

After 17 years, perenni- 
al indie underdog Centro- 
matic knows something about embracing the 
long odds. The local quartet’s 11th studio LP 
plays to those defiant in the struggle, buffer- 
ing the balance of resolve and regret. Take 
Pride also ventures more diverse and eclectic, 
from the title track’s methodical guitar crunch 
and lo-fi ambience to the almost Eighties rock 
rhythm of lead single “Salty Disciple.” Will 
Johnson’s diesel-burning vocals still inflect 
gritty determination, especially on the slower 
“Every Mission” and dreamy, reverbed “Any- 
thing Torn Cut.” “Academy of Lunkers” acts 
as centerpiece behind hard-bitten but melodic 
lines. Guitars broil on the driving “Cynthia 
Glass” and caustic scrapes of “Cn the Ride 
Back,” and simmer on the understated “Hey 
There, Straps” and percussive Jabs of “Rela- 
tive Unto Aces.” Closer “Through the Fog, 

Then Down” finally stuns inwardly impression- 
istic, with a subtle aching croon washing into 
encroaching darkness. 

★★★ 


The Mastersons 

Good Luck Charm 
(New West) 

Good Luck Charm 
arrives as the Master- 
sons’ second effort, but 
it’s the couple’s first full- 
on collaboration. Cn 2012’s Birds Fiy South, 
marrieds Eleanor Whitmore and Chris Master- 
son offered mostly their own songs. Here, they 


both had a hand in bringing all 11 tracks to 
life. Accomplished musicians, she playing 
with Regina Spektor and Kelly Willis, and he 
with Son Volt and Jack Ingram - they’re both 
current members of Steve Earle’s band - they 
now match those abilities with tunes of 
spunky wit and a rare measure of emotional 
maturity. Boasting famed producer Jim Scott, 
Good Luck Charm strikes close to the jangle of 
Tom Petty’s Heartbreakers, while the effort- 
less harmonies bring to mind the Jayhawks’ 
brand of Americana. A busting-out-of-the-gate 
title track, the effortless mix of guitar hooks 
and orchestral strings on “It’s Not Like Me,” 
and the soaring vocals of “Uniform” are but a 
trio of highlights on an album filled with the 
Mastersons’ tantalizing new dimensions. 

- Jim Caiigiuri 

J. Wagner 

The Runaway Kid 

J. Wagner writes songs 
like the novel you long for 
after the last page is 
turned. Wagner’s self- 
released sophomore 
album. The Runaway Kid, proves he’s not Just 
whittling words. He’s become a commander of 
ideation. Wagner grew up in Albuquerque, 
went to college in Denton, worked as a park 
ranger in Joshua Tree National Park, and now 
calls Austin home, a headquarters from which 
he’s become a mainstay of the Kerrville Folk 
Festival community, where he met writing part- 
ner Gregory Alan Isakov. It’s the latter’s ver- 
sion of their mutual “If I Go, I’m Goin’” that 
made it onto Caiifornication. The Runaway Kid 
features two Isakov co-writes alongside Ron 
Scott, which double as the hits of the album, 
“Houston” and “Suitcase Full of Sparks.” 


Soon you’ll be humming to the former: 

“Maybe the highway took all my last chances/ 
Maybe the high water was Just another one to 
blame/ That hot summer sidewalk hardens all 
my good intentions/ Did the heart grow hungry 
when all there was was concrete.” Wagner’s 
minimalist approach is a relief, new like spring 
after a long, hard winter, sublime as the sum- 
mer sun rising and setting on your front porch. 
★★★★ - Wiiiiam Harries Graham 

Christopher 
Denny 

If the Roses Don't Kill Us 
(Partisan) 

Christopher Denny 
arrives blessed with a ten- 
der vibrato that might 
have made Roy Orbison tip down his shades. 
The Little Rock transplant’s first album in 
seven years kicks off with the bipolar guitar 
and banjo play of “Happy Sad,” which, for all 


its monosyllabic simplicity, foreshadows the 
singer’s lyrical duality of pain and hope. The 
love songs come in numbers: the acoustic infe- 
riority complex of the gorgeous “God’s Height;” 
unique respect for personal privacy via a “Mil- 
lion Little Thoughts;” and the distrust of “Love 
Is a Code Word” and “Man a Fool,” the latter 
reminiscent of Elvis Presley’s “Suspicious 
Minds.” Denny’s agile melodies and good- 
hearted lyrics largely carry the batch, though 
questionable single “Watch Me Shine” comes 
off underwritten and reliant on vocal flair. If the 
Roses Don't Kill Us bookends brilliantly with the 
black church gospel of “Some Things,” a musi- 
cal high point for the Dave Sanger-produced 
backline of tidy roots rock sessioned by local 
blue-chippers including Glenn Fukunaga, Cindy 
Cashdollar, and Marty Muse. They bring profes- 
sionalism, but not the stage-tested chemistry 
and power of a devoted crew. Christopher 
Denny remains a talent without a band. 

★★★ - Kevin Curtin 



- Doug Freeman 





Pulsewidth 



BY GREG BEETS 

Obsolete Future 

Cassettes live? They do 
for Chronicle contributor 
Conor Walker and Charles 
Balias, proprietors of Aus- 
tin/Denver electronic music 
label Obsolete Future. While 
no new car sold in the U.S. 
since model year 2010 has 
included a tape deck, that 
hasn’t stopped the pair 
from reimagining the fleet- 
ing format as a sort of ret- 
ro-futuristic calling card. 


Coupled with the label’s 
focus on vintage electronic 
experimentalism, it’s easy 
to get swept up in a 
plugged-in landscape that’s 
simultaneously nostalgic 
and forward-leaning. The 
best place to start is 
House of Mutes, VoL 1, a 
sprawling (literal) mixtape 
vacillating between intimate 
living room techno (Manne- 
quinz’s “ShiyanSC”), drip- 
drop proto-glitch (Cygnus’ 
“Varaxis Networks”), and 
ambient Dutch still life 
(BuzzzuwfarfewwW’s “Morn- 


inghaze”). Other standouts 
among the 15 tracks 
include “Live at Switched 
On” by Austin-based house 
spelunkers Bodytronix and 
Dyad’s silky-smooth “Verti- 
cal Hold.” Amino from Den- 
ver’s Formant offers a 
tightly wound half-hour of 
atmospheric delights, some 
passages bringing to mind 
Raymond Scott bending cir- 
cuits alongside Goblin, 
though the overall mood is 
surprisingly naturalistic. If 
Georgetown’s Inner Space 
Cavern ever resurrects its 


Aquarian-era “Sights and 
Sounds Show,” this could 
be its soundtrack. At an 
evolving pace. Paradise’s 
Void Weather cultivates a 
refined air of detachment. 
Majestic bursts of mechani- 
cal bombast pan out across 
the sky over insistent spar- 
tan rhythms. Hints at dysto- 
pia underlie the reverberant 
bleeps and low-end drone 
of “Ziqqurat,” but the hyp- 
notic qualities of Austin’s 
Morgan Jones make resis- 
tance futile. Alienself from 
WWC (local Bill Converse) 


luxuriates in an even deeper 
strain of esoterica. Pulsat- 
ing synth figures on “Under- 
story Rain” slice through 
static against a macabre 
hum backdrop, while 
“Threshold” scavenges dis- 
tressed TV news bumpers 
from the Seventies, and the 
21-minute “Wingspan” 
invites epic contemplation 
of radio waves bouncing 
around the far reaches of 
space. Fret not if you can’t 
scrounge up an old Jambox. 
These releases are also 
available on Bandcamp. 


48 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE AUGUSTS, 2014 austinchronicle.com 






DVDnds 

BY RAOUL HERNANDEZ 

ZZTop 

Live at Montreux20l3 (Eagle Vision) 

Ever wondered what’s behind Billy Gibbons’ not-so- 
cheap sunglasses? Eighty minutes Live at Montreux 
2013 gets right up in the guitarist’s fuzzy mug, the 
green buds on his skull cap poking out from under his 
regulation sombrero like cannabis rivulets. ZZ Top on 
Blu-ray breaches all kinds of interpersonal space. Gib- 
bons and co-front furry Dusty “Get a load of those 
choppers” Hill trade verses on the opening “Got Me 
Under Pressure” as you scope the Longhorn brands on 
both their axes. When Frank Beard hits his oil derrick 
intro to “Gimme All Your Lovin’” you’ll marvel at his 
bleached, tawny longevity. The 45-year-old Houston trio 
remains a living piece of Lone Star history, like the 
Alamo, Armadillo, and Austin had they not succumbed 
to manifest destiny. Tribute to late Montreux Jazz Festival founder Claude Nobs prompts the 
band stretching out with Austinites Van Wilks and Mike Flanigin (see “Playback,” July 18), while 
newer material from the most recent La Futura - Houstonian screw “I Gotsta Get Paid,” and 
the “Tush” rebooty “Chartreuse” - melt in with swamp standards “Waitin’ for the Bus”/“Jesus 
Just Left Chicago” and “My Head’s in Mississippi.” Gibbons’ perforated picking on “Pincush- 
ion” draws blood, and though Hill taking lead vocal duties on “I Loved a Woman” evokes his 
mom’s refrain, “Let Dusty sing one!” (revisit “ZZ Top,” Dec. 27, 2013), his partner’s high regis- 
ter on “Legs” still chills. Encores “Tube Snake Boogie,” “La Grange” ... Live at Montreux 2013, 
best house concert ever. - Raoul Hernandez 



Kelley 
Mickwee 
You Used to Live 
Here 

With the Trishas on 
“open-ended” hiatus, 

Kelley Mickwee 
becomes the first of 
the lauded local quin- 
tet to release any solo material. You Used to 
Live Here, bordering on an EP at a slim seven 
tracks, combines the singer’s native Memphis 
roots with those of her Austin homestead. It’s 
soulful in a Dusty Springfield kind of way, 
tough and gutsy in spots, vulnerable in oth- 
ers. There’s a striking co-write with Owen 
Temple, “Beautiful Accidents,” a duet that 
stands out as their voices slide against each 
other on a back-roads love story. “River Girl,” 
co-written with Kevin Welch, sets up the high 
humidity felt throughout, while Mickwee does 
a near-perfect job with tunes from John Full- 


bright and Eliza Gilkyson, the downhearted 
“Blameless” from the former and a sultry 
“Dark Side of Town” from the latter. Too short 
by a couple of tunes, but an impressive debut 
Just the same. 

★★★ - Jim Caligiuri 

Jess Klein 

Learning Faith 

The title track to 
Jess Klein’s seventh 
studio LP sets a tone 
of seeking and defi- 
ance at the outset, a 
direct and bluesy 
stare back at strug- 
gles personal, cultural, and spiritual. Klein’s 
vocals and vision have matured with power 
and confidence, ripping raw on biting rocker 
“So Fucking Cool,” and beautifully tender in 
the swells of “Loving You” and weary vulnera- 

continued onp.50 




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austinchronicle.com AUGUST 8, 2014 the Austin chronicle 49 







TEXAS PLATTERS continued from p.49 


7&7IS 


BY KEVIN CURTIN 


im 



Flesh Lights 
**No Longer" / 

**You Don^t Know" 

(Twistworthy) 

Sophomore LP due 
sometime this fall, 

Flesh Lights throw fans 
a bone in this two-tune 
7-inch of beer-soaked live favorites record- 
ed by Austin expat Mike Vasquez in his Ore- 
gon studio. Side A spins the airtight guitar 
pop of “No Longer,” in which boyish axeman 
Max Vandever contemplates personal 
growth as a good reason for not reconciling 
with his ex. Flip the platter and Jeremy 
Steen gasps to keep pace with Elissa Uss- 
ery’s punk pounding while riding a four-note 
hook into the potent chorus of “You Don’t 
Know.” Chemistry bristles in one of ATX’s 
most exciting bands: Vandever the artist, 
Steen the rocker, and Ussery the firepower. 

Mrs. Glass 

‘^Happy Every Day" 

/‘^Bring It Around" 

(Alphabet Records) 

Not long after Phar- 
rell Williams tainted the 
phrase “I’m happy” as 
a hook, locals Mrs. 

Glass, still the confusing nom-de-band of 
guitarist/vocalist Jordan Webster, multi- 
instrumentalist Ivan Evangelista, and drum- 
mer Ian Fry, quietly released an irresistible 
45 with just that line. Soulful slacker love 
song, “Flappy Every Day” rides overdriven 
slide guitar into a stacked refrain and Web- 
ster belting “I’m happy every day!” - arch 
irony considering the frontman’s stern 
demeanor. Tough-as-nails B-side “Bring It 
Around” could be Motorhead on a swamp 
rock kick. Both tunes leave the group’s 
2013 debut in the dust. 

Secret 

Prostitutes / 

Crooked Bangs 

(Erste Theke 
Tontrager) 

Two Texas punk 
trios clash on vinyl 
with the intensity of Flulk Flogan and Andre 
the Giant’s Wrestlemania III showdown, 
which emblazons the cover. Flouston’s 
Secret Prostitutes make the most out of the 
format’s runtime, cramming three of their 
Indonesian punk songs onto one side, the 
best of which, “Mengapa Aku Flarus,” finds 
dexterous drummer/vocalist Adit Samudra 
tossing metered shouts over buoyant fret- 
work and a springy rhythm. Locals Crooked 
Bangs, whose dark wave chugs low on “Ce 
Type” under the French moan of bassist 
Leda Ginestra, explodes on the flip side into 
a furious power-chord workout by guitarist 
Samantha Wendel, accelerating until it 
devolves into wreckage. A foreign language 
curio your punk singles collection demands. 



bility of “Wish.” Klein inhibits perspectives 
with tangible, reality-grounded emotion, but 
the local songwriter also manifests the deeply 
personal aspect of politics with the dark, 
seething “If There’s a God,” inspired by 
Wendy Davis’ filibuster. Then there’s “Dear 
God,” which finds a pregnant teenager grap- 
pling with a world where, “I tried to see the 
doctor today, but the governor slammed the 
door right in my face.” Finding her own voice 
while lending it to those in need, Jess Klein’s 
faith is worn from experience, and stronger 
for it. 

★★★ - Doug Freeman 





Speak 

Pedals 

(Playing in Traffic) 

Speak’s 2011 debut 
showcased 10-foot-tall 
anthems that swirled with 
synth hooks and big 

ideas. The local foursome’s follow-up. Pedals, 
further proves their penchant for the grandiose, 
delivering a sonic blowout as large as it is 
entrancing. “Mystery Lights” and “Gates” lead 
off like the dance-floor apocalypse, leaving a 
big impression before lapsing into a pleasant 
blur of pulsing, sad-kid shuffle beats. Deeper 
in, the nuances of Pedals emerge in “Modern 
Art,” which deconstructs an Eighties, Joie-de- 
vivre chorus and pieces it back together over a 
drum snap. “Be Reasonable, Diane” explores a 
different part of the same decade, drawing 
from the infectious-but-controlled camp of 
Tears for Fears that will bounce around in your 
head long after the song fades. On Pedals, 
Speak is dreaming - and delivering - big. 

- Abby Johnston 

Suspirians 

(Super Secret Records) 

The difference between hearing a song and 
experiencing it distinguishes good bands from 
great ones. Suspirians’ eponymous debut 
delivers the goods with feeling. The local quar- 
tet’s disjointed guitars and vocal sass of front- 
woman Marisa Pool recall impassioned Nine- 
ties femme punks Fleavens to Betsy and Brat- 


mobile, the seven-song 
long-player blending rau- 
cous rock inspiration with 
crisp Sixties surf-pop. 

Standout “In My Time” 
flexes Pool’s bratty style 
and clean licks, which 
slowly crescendo into an 
eventual noise frenzy. Raw and DIY, but with 
intent, Suspirians will ideally serve as the foun- 
dation on which the group fortifies its unique- 
ness by bridging the gap between musical 
influences and budding aesthetic. Some might 
consider this debut’s rudimentary bareness 
amateurish, but that camp never understood 
the appeal of bands like Pavement, a group 
that, like Suspirians, proved great feeling can 
flourish in music despite its creators’ air of 
apathy and/or lack of technical precision. 
iririri - Neph Basedow 

Pong 

Gone (Saustex) 

Bouncing off satellites 
like the Nineties - and for 
that matter, the Fifties, 

Sixties, and most of the 
Aughties - never hap- 
pened, Pong gets good 
and Gone on album No. 3. Grown to a septet 
with the addition of singer Kerri Atwood, the 
band of former Ed Halls, Moist Fists, and 
Pocket FishRmen pogos through its patented 
blend of post-punk discowave and classic rock 
riff-bang as deftly as ever. Bright-eyed and 
shiny-tailed, “Electronic Friend” and “Livin’ in 
the Future” froth like pop hits from the early 
Reagan years, the latter naughtily filtering a 
melody borrowed from Loverboy through a 
Gary Numan strainer. “Fish Sauce,” “The 
Spot” (with its floating Donna Summer scat), 
and “Still Here” Jerk the herk with leering 
enthusiasm and no small amount of skill, 
lacking only an ironic cultural agenda and a 
Booji Boy to be seminal New Wave signposts. 
“Sleepwalker” starts with lush, nearly folky 
pop before twisting its knees into a clangier, 
clattering bridge. Atwood showcase “Lyman 
Was the Pillow” waves its dream logic like a 



The Dead Space 

Faker (12XU) 

Much as the inner sleeve photo of birds circling a pollu- 
tion-belching smokestack suggests, this spry post-punk 
trio’s debut LP births a series of tightly wound meditations 
on loss and isolation. Austerity abounds in both the spartan 
arrangements and forlorn subject matter. The upside of this 
approach is heightened potency. Even the smallest details of 
these 10 songs matter. Despite a straightforward tone 
devoid of excessive pedal-pushing, Garrett Hadden coaxes a 
remarkable degree of color from his guitar, consistently intu- 
iting when to lay out and thus making his wiry bursts of industrial-strength deconstruction 
all the more arresting. The twin bursts of reverb-soaked clatter that bookend “Master For- 
get” exemplify the strategic power of falling apart at the right time. “Both Eyes” simulta- 
neously summons gothic shivers and flailing abandon to deliver a compelling exercise in 
three-minute urgency, while “You’re Fake” maintains titular fidelity by pivoting toward 
straight punk rock. The ever-prolific Quin Galavis complements his creeping basslines 
with dark-tunnel vox that utilize opacity as a device, allowing listeners to draw their own 
connections. It all leads up to “So Long,” a climactic coup de grace built on a slow-rising 
groundswell of feedback and Just enough humanity to temper the icy sting of resignation. 
★★★★ - Greg Beets 


lighter at a concert. Quirky in Just the right 
way. Gone keeps feet in both breezy irrever- 
ence and dedicated craftspersonship, while 
still enticing the most bearded hipster to 
dance. 

- Michael Toland 



Casual Strangers 

Launching a side gig 
while your day Job hits a 
peak seems like odd tim- 
ing. And yet, that’s what 
Boxing Lesson singer/gui- 
tarist Paul Waclawsky 
does with Casual Strang- 
ers, a quartet co-led by singer Katey Gunn, 
whose self-titled debut follows hot on the 
heels of the Lesson’s triumphant Big Hits. At 
first blush, the sidestep seems casual 
indeed: Acid-dream opener “Tune Your Brain” 
and muscular cosmic trip “Space Blues” 
would fit nicely on the primary band’s LPs. 
Things quickly take an eccentric turn when 
Gunn goes spoken word on the shimmering 
“Casual Strangers (We Used to Be Friends)” 
to castigate a former lover, and Waclawsky 
does his best Barry White imitation on the 
rocking “Looking Good” alongside Gunn’s 
coo. Bracing lead guitar passes the baton to 
hair-raising giggles on “Banshee,” while drum 
mer Jake Mitchell’s trip-hop beats undulate 
through the pretty “Caribbean Cask.” By the 
time that Floydian cocked eyebrow “Don’t 
Worry About a Thing” arrives and the garage 
innuendo of “Put Your Mussy On My Mussy” 
pounds, the threesome inhabits another uni- 
verse entirely. Twisting expectations with 
shameless imagination. Casual Strangers 
bounces gleefully between the brain, the 
gonads, and the funny bone. 




■ Michael Toland 



The Ugly Beats 

Brand New Day (Get Hip 
Recordings) 

All too easy to take the 
Ugly Beats for granted. 

That’s due as much to 
their contemporary folk- 
punk sheen as to the 

musicians’ affable personalities. Overlooking 
them - egregious error. Leader Joe Emery and 
Daniel Wilcox’s guitars veer closer to Roger 
McGuinn’s Jangle action than the usual fuzz- 
tone snarls, while the frontman’s vocals evoke 
Buddy Holly’s adenoidal plea far more than the 
lonesome polecat strut of a Jagger. Jeanine 
Attaway’s Farfisa organ is the band’s bedrock, 
yet the clean-cut sonics don’t mean the Ugly 
Beats’ music hops all sunny days and lolli- 
pops. The overall mood of Brand New Day is 
melancholic (the title track, “All of the Things,” 
“Braced for the Fall”), with a dose of yearning 
(“I Want That Girl,” “Gone for Good”), and a 
dollop of pleading (“Throw Me a Line”). Add an 
appropriately adult cover of Tim Hardin’s “If I 
Were a Carpenter” and by far the best song 
written for fallen local guitar hero Nick Curran 
(“Up on the Sun”): “No time to reflect, no time 
for past mistakes/ ... Come what may, if I have 
my way, you’ll find me out on top of the sun.” 
The results highlight a silver lining obscuring a 
black cloud - with a beat. 

★★★ - Tim Stegall 


50 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE AUGUSTS, 2014 austinchronicle.com 





Blues Cruise 


BY TIM STEGALL 


Lou Ann Barton 

The Best! (Rock Beat Records) 

Lou Ann Barton originated in Fort Worth, but the vet- 
eran blues belter made her name, home, and career in 
Austin. Likewise, The Best! isn’t mere description of this 
compilation. It’s a declaration of artistry. The lovingly 
assembled career retrospective crowns her the capital’s 
Queen of the Blues by virtue of tremendous lung-power, 
the vocal equivalent of a Fifties blues guitarist scream- 
ing through a busted amp. Inhabiting every song, she’s 
pulled straight from the DNA of Etta James, Big Mama 
Thornton, and Wanda Jackson, and stood before some 
of the greatest acts of late 20th century blues: Fabulous 
Thunderbirds, Roomful of Blues, and Triple Threat, which 
became Double Trouble shortly before Barton left it to 
guitarist Stevie Ray Vaughan. The cast list for this disc, musician and producer, is astonishing: 
longtime collaborators Jimmie Vaughan, Derek O’Brien, Denny Freeman, Tommy Shannon, George 
Rains, plus David “Fathead” Newman, Mac “Dr. John” Rebennack, Jerry Wexler, and the classic 
Muscle Shoals Sound Studios rhythm section, which played on her ill-fated 1982 Asylum Records 
LP, Old Enough, produced by Wexler and - of all people - Glenn Frey. The heart of the album front- 
loads at the very beginning: unreleased demos cut at Wexler’s request in 1981, with the classic 
Vaughan/Keith Ferguson/Fran Christina lineup of ATX’s T-Birds. Augmented with Joe Sublett’s and 
Luke McNamee’s saxes and Denny Levin’s piano, this outfit tears through some choice nuggets: 
Jimmie Logsdon’s rockabilly obscurity “Rocket in My Pocket,” Lazy Lester’s swamp pop immortal 
“Sugar Coated Love,” the Chantels’ doo-wop plea “Maybe.” As Vaughan puts it in the liner notes, 
“She didn’t care if the lyrics were written for a man. She didn’t care about nothing’ ’cept tearing 
the roof off the club.” She tears the head off all five of these demos, and every other track on this 
disc. It doesn’t matter if the songs were originated by Barbara Lynn (“You’ll Lose a Good Thing”), 
Slim Flarpo (“Shake Your Flips,” “Te Ni Nee Ni Nu”), Ike & Tina Turner (“I Idolize You”), or Faye 
Adams, whose “Shake a Fland” appears in two different versions. By the time she gets through 
with them, all have become Lou Ann Barton songs. You’ll never want to hear anyone else sing 
them. “She keeps it raw,” Etta James gushes in the liners. “When they write the bible about the 
best blues singers ... Lou Ann Barton better have her own chapter.” 

★★★★ 



Adrian & 
the Sickness 

Be Your Own Savior 
(Fantom Records) 

Blessed is she who 
headbangs to the beat of 
her own drum. Local 
shredder Adrian Conner, in the process of 
dropping “the Sickness,” lets her dreads fly 
on Be Your Own Saviour, an all-but-in-name- 
only solo debut. The longtime Austin punker 
opens with dreamy, wordless interlude 
“Bluespace,” lets rip on “Tightrope & Taboos,” 
and delivers a sing-along anthem in “Take the 
World.” Combined, it’s a burst of passion this 
town is accustomed to; Conner routinely kills 
it as Angus Young in all-woman AC/DC tribute 
Flell’s Belles. In terms of pure spirit. Be Your 
Own Saviour boils deep feelings into digest- 
ible verse, but it only comes in chunks of 
cohesion. “Relaxsieepdream” closes with a 
pitter-patter of notes and two repeating lines: 
“When my eyes weren’t so wide/ I learned to 
cry.” The two-and-a-half minute lullaby frames 
the album, but that time could’ve been better 
spent showcasing the veteran’s powerful 
vocals and her Gibson guitar prowess. An art- 
ist with as many miles and as much gumption 
as Conner must have more to say, so you can 
bet your ass this isn’t the last you’ll hear 
from her. 

iriri - Nina Hernandez 


Joe King Carrasco 
y El Molino 
Rucca (Anaconda) 

Tex-Mex rock & roll insti- 
gator Joe King Carrasco 
continues his relentless 
run of self-releases with 
Rucca, the second consecutive disc employing 
his late-Seventies group El Molino, which today 
includes respected locals John X Reed, Speedy 
Sparks, Ernie Durawa, Augie Meyers, and Joe 
Morales. Rucca lays out exactly what we’ve 
come to expect from the exuberant New Wave 
act: a migas of oldies rock, Mexican styles, 
and silly Spanglish. Opening with two strong 
cuts, the infectious organ-led title track and 
Carrasco’s ode to the sunny border state of 
“Chihuahua,” the album then wears out with 
formulaic B-grade writing. A trio of sappy slow 
dances - “To Be Loved,” “Because a Woman,” 
and eye-rolling “On Top of a Teardrop” - land 
the King in easy-listening territory complete 
with romantic saxophone. Carrasco also tri- 
ples-down on loosely metaphorical food songs 
with “Nacho Daddy,” “Muchos Frijoles Borra- 
chos,” and “Tamale Christmas,” but catch- 
phrase fishing “Flasta Manana Iguana” and lyr- 
ical cop-out “Better Leave a Message” make 
you wonder if the frontman’s said adios to the 
clever bilingual lyricism evident on last year’s 
excellent TIaquepaque. Rucca’s an under- 
whelming sequel. 

if'i - Kevin Curtin 






iriK KIMUJ 


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www.frinqefmaustin.com 



austinchronicle.com AUGUST 8, 2014 the AUSTIN chronicle 51 





LISTINGS 




Recommendations for the week-minded 

AUGUST 7-14 


submit! 

For FAQs about submitting a 
iisting, contact info, deadiines, 
and an oniine submission 
form, go to austinchronicle. 
com/submit. 


H 

z 


p,12 

Civics 101 

p,54 



FILM: 

The Lady Eve 

Marchesa Hall, 7:30pm 


COMMUNITY: 

Anime Overload 

Holiday Inn Austin Midtown 



THURSDAY 

7 


FRIDAY 

8 


U 

H 

z 

o 

U 

o 


Theatre 

Comedy 

p,56 

Dance 

Classical Music 
Visual Arts 
Gay Place 


U 

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PQ 

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C/D 

U 

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I— I 

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p.58 

Litera 

Community 

p.59 

Sports 

Kids 

Out of Town 

p.60 

FUm 

p.68 

Music 



COMMUNITY: 

Ice Cream Festival 

Fiesta Gardens, 10am-7pm 


FILM: 

Rear Window 

Aiamo Ritz, 4pm rii 


MUSIC: 

Maxwell 

Long Center 


THEATRE: 

We Play Chekov 

Long Center, 8pm 




SATURDAY 

9 


SUNDAY 

10 


MONDAY 

11 


TUESDAY 

12 


WEDNESDAY 

13 



MEAL TIMES: Pay It Forward AT&T Conference Center, 6-lOpm 

COMMUNITY: Austin Monthly Bachelor Party W Austin, 7-10:30pm 
FILM: The Bad and the Beautiful Paramount, 7pm 


LITERA: Write Bloody Showcase BookPeople, 7pm 
FILM: That Guy Dick Miller Marchesa Hall, 7:30pm 
MUSIC: Walter Salas - Humar of the Silos ABGB 
MUSIC: The Hold Steady Frank 
COMEDY: Mike Merryfield Velveeta Room, 9pm 


COMMUNITY: Barton Springs Fest Barton Springs, 8am-7pm 
FILM: AGFA Cinemapocalypse Alamo Ritz, 2pm 
SPORTS: Texas Roller Derby Palmer Events Center, 7pm 
THEATRE: The Soundtrack Series North Door, 8pm 
MUSIC: OFF! With Dale Grover Mohawk 
MUSIC: Wanda Jackson Continental Club 


MEAL TIMES: Sunday Funday Hyatt Regency Austin, noon-4pm 

FILM: The Great Dictator Paramount, 3:45pm 
THEATRE: Cosplay Expo The Vortex, through next Sunday, 5pm- 
12mid 

CLASSICAL MUSIC: Flree Concerts in the Park Long Center, 7:30pm 


FILM: Summer With Monika Spider House Ballroom, 8:30pm 

MUSIC: Clap Your Hands Say Yeah/Casket Girls Mohawk 
FILM: David Lynch Mystery Program Alamo Ritz, 10:35pm 


SPORTS: Round Rock Express Dell Diamond, 7:05pm 
FILM: Rebecca Stateside at the Paramount, 7:15pm 

FILM: On the Waterfront Paramount, 9:25pm 


CIVICS 101: Council District 7 Candidate Forum Yarborough Branch 
Library, 7pm 

LITERA: The Nixon Tapes BookPeople, 7pm 
FILM: Raiders of the Lost Ark Long Center, 7pm 
MUSIC: The Both Mohawk 

FILM: Summer Camp Nightmare Alamo Ritz, 10:15pm 


KIDS: Robotics Camp Zavala Elementary, 9am-5:30pm 

VISUAL ARTS: The People’s Gallery: Art After 6 City Hall, 6-8pm 
FILM: Vannin' Alamo Slaughter, 7:15pm 
FILM: Internes Can’t Take Money Marchesa Hall, 7:30pm 
MUSIC: Nine Inch Nails, Soundgarden Circuit of the Americas 
COMMUNITY: Punk Nite Austin Roller Rink, 9pm 


52 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE AUGUST8,2014 austinchronicle.com 









SATURDAY, AUGUST 9TH 



KIDS FUN 10AM-2PM FREE COLD WATERMELON! 

Poets by tlie Pool 10AM-4PM 

BARTON SPRINGS UNIVERSITY I0AM-4PM 
SNORKEL ECO-TOURS STARTING AT 8:30 AM 
LIVE MUSIC 4-7PM ON SOUTH HILL 

Krfilirtchell EnvirdnmBfvtal Law Fund 

.4ssDdatiun SILICON L*BS 

^ * Barklay Houses ^ dM' 

Jefinjr Clart Mere^^hli Dnelss Ray C^o^drkh Dick K-iHcrmaf! Tuccy Whitley 

Frv4tiick. Pwilw. AJ|™?o $. Rg^kw^ll iLo i Kfl*/ ftoilO^ CartM £ A4iw SJlIreaB 


Schedule of E’v^euts 

aW events are free and at Barton Springs Poof 

8 - 8:30 am - Blessing of the Springs 

Led by Mflfc/a Locas, aoo Tracey 

8:30am- 10:30am - Eco-Snorkei Tours of Barton Springs 

fleservdbdn on/y Contact 5f>siVifo^50sa/f;aiKe.cvg 

9:30 -10:30 am ■ Yoga 

Under big tree - outside bad en trance olf Hobert £ Lee 

10am -2pm - Kids Fun 

North side near sbalLotv end 

Songs by Mr. Habitat Biii Oliver; endangered species activities 

10am -4pm - Poets by the Poof 

fly the fron t gate statue of fledidie/t Dobie and IVebb 

10am '4pm - Bartorr Springs University 

Under the jjecans airwig the badr fence of Barton Spnngs POof 

10 am ■ Karen Kocher, fiimmaker and UT Faculty member 
'Barton Springs; A Place for Everyone' 

10:45 am - Dr. Jay Banner, Professor, UT Jackson School of Geosciences, & 
Director, UT Environmental Sciences Institute 
"Central Texas Water and a Changing Gimate' 

1 1:30 am - Dr. Hayley Gillespie; expert on Central Texas 
Eurycea Salamanders 
'Save SalarTranders, Save Springs^ 

12:30- 1pm -Break 

1 pm - Roy Vlfaley, Conservation Chair, Austin Group, Sierra Club, & 

Steve Beers, President, Save Barton Creek 
"Keep Mopac Local - Uopac, SH 45 SW, and Barton Springs' 

1 :45 pm - David Foster, Director, Clean Water Action -Texas, and 
Luke Metzger, Director, Environment Texas 
"Austin's Water Future" 

2:30 pm - Laura Morrison, City Council Member and Brigid Shea, Former 
City Council Member & Former SOS Executive Director 
'Austin Water and New 1 0-1 City Council System' 

3:1 5 pm - Gary Perez, Native Americai) Church & I ndigenous Cultures 
Institute of San Marcos 

4 -7pm - Live Music! 

South Lawn 


Visit S05Alliance.org #6SFest2014 


Dave Madden Band 
Minor Mishap Marching Band 
Mash 

austinchronicle.com AUGUST 8, 2014 the Austin chronicle 53 


LISTINGS 


ITHEATRE 




OPENING 

A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM: THE FARTHEST 
STEEP OF INDIA This new version of Shakespeare’s 
ciassic features ciassicai, foik, and Boiiywood dance 
- and iive music by the Sacred Cowgirls. Fri.-Sat, 

Aug. 8-23, 7pm. Extra show: Thu., Aug. 21, 7pm. 
Scottish Rite Theater, 207 W. 18th, 512/472-5436. 
$15-30. www.scottishritetheater.org. 

THE SOUNDTRACK SERIES Direct from New York 

City, but amplified by local luminaries, this popuiar 
show is where performers and writers take the mic 
to share the stories and memories they forever asso- 
ciate with a song from their past. Hosted by Dana 
Rossi and featuring Johnny Goudie, Mia Martina, 

Ellen Stader, Andy Campbell, Dale Dudley, and 
Laurie Gallardo. Sat, Aug. 9, 8pm. North Door, 

502 Brushy, 512/485-3002. $10. www.thenorthdoor.com. 

CIRCUS CHICKENDOG: THE WIZARD OF DOGZ We 

iove us some Circus Chickendog, and here Darren 
Peterson’s muitispecies troupe gives us yet another 
reason why: Six rescued dogs team up with a trained 
Scarlet Macaw, puppets, jugglers, unicyclists, and 
live musicians for an action-packed interpretation of 
the movie classic. The Wizard of Oz. Mentally, you pic- 
ture these dogs - but this show’s got to be seen to 
be believed. Pro tip: If you have kids, bring ’em! 
Mon.-Fri., Aug. 11-22, 3pm. Institution Theater, 

3708 Woodbury, 512/895-9580. www.chickendog.net. 

CLOSING 

CYRANO DE BERGERAC Edmond Rostand's clas- 

sic romance of 1640s Paris, adapted by Anthony 
Burgess, is directed here by Jeff Hinkle for City 
Theatre. Through Aug. 10. Thu.-Sat, 8pm; Sun., 
5:30pm. City Theatre, 3823-D Airport, 512/524-2870. 
$10-25. ww.citytheatreaustin.org. 

SUMMER STOCK AUSTIN This 10th anniversary 
season of Summer Stock Austin bring us Footloose 
(directed and choreographed by Ginger Morris), 
Chicago (directed by Michael McKelvey, choreo- 
graphed by Rocker Verastique), and the world pre- 
miere of Allen Robertson’s Stone Soup. Through 
Aug. 10. Long Center for the Performing Arts, 

701 W. Riverside, 512/457-5100. $10 and up. 
www.summerstockaustin.org. 

SHAKESPEARE AT WINEDALE It’s the 44th season 
of UT-instigated Bardic thespianism out there in the 
gorgeous Hill Country, with The Taming of the Shrew, 
The Merry Wives of Windsor, and Troilus and Cres- 
sida. Through Aug. 10. Winedaie Historical Center, Off 
FM 2714, Round Top, 512/471-4726. www.utexas.edu. 

THIS IS OUR YOUTH This is Kenneth Lonergan’s 

classic look at the lives of young adults - some pretty 
aimless, conniving, insecure young adults - you know: 
regular humans - trying to scrape by and figure out 
who the fuck they are in Eighties New York City. By 
stealing money from their lingerie-tycoon father? Good 
stuff, here directed by Dannie Snyder for Punchkin 
Repertory. See p.34 for review. Through Aug. 10. 
Fri.-Sun., 8pm. The Off Center, 2211-A Hidalgo, 
512/476-7833. $15. www.punchkin.org. 

PORT AUTHORITY Hyde Park Theatre’s Ken Webster 

returns to the darkly comedic scriptwork of Conor 
McPherson (St. Nicholas and The Good Thief), and the 
acclaimed actor/director’s bringing Tom Green and 
Nate Jackson along with him in this story of a young 
man falling for his female roommate, a middle-aged 
alcoholic in a great job he can’t handle, and a widow- 
er who receives a mysterious package. Through Aug. 

9. Thu.-Sat, 8pm. Hyde Park Theatre, 511 W. 43rd, 
512/479-7529. $20-22 (with discounts for students, 
seniors, military, and Austin Creative Alliance; pay-what- 
you-wish, Thursdays), www.hydeparktheatre.org. 

ONGOING 

VECINOS Teatro Vivo presents a new bilingual com- 
edy written by Rupert Reyes and directed by Mary 
Aiice Carnes, featuring Aiejandra Murga, Karinna 
Perez-Cantu, Mario Ramirez, and the playwright 
himself. Through Aug. 17. Thu.-Sat, 8pm; Sun., 2pm. 
Mexican American Cultural Center, 600 River. $14-20 
(pay-what-you-wish, Thursday), www.teatrovivo.org. 

O BRIGHT NOW BEYOND Set decades after the 
events of The Wizard of Oz, this Oz has lost its 
luster, and faces hardships brought by drought and 
disillusionment. Witness this new work of musi- 
cal theatre by Daniei Aiexander Jones and Bobby 
Haivorson, based loosely upon L. Frank Baum’s The 
Marvelous Land of Oz. It’s “one part trunk-show and 
one part ritual of remembrance,” directed by Wiii 
Davis for Saivage Vanguard Theater, and featuring 
performances by Cami Aiys, Fiorinda Bryant, Wesiey 
Bryant, Jacques Coiimon, the Chronicle’s own Robert 


Faires, Nitra Gutierrez, Heather Hanna, Daniei 
Aiexander Jones, Jarrett King, Aiexis Leah Scott, 
Caria Nickerson, and Robert Pierson. Through Aug. 
23. Thu.-Sat, 8pm. Saivage Vanguard Theater, 2803 
Manor Rd., 512/474-7886. $15-20 (two-for-one, July 
31 & Aug. 7). www.saivagevanguard.org. 

LEWD ASIAN WOMEN This show weaves Chinese 
mythology and contemporary Austin into a modern 
tale inspired by the 1875 U.S. Supreme Court 
case Chy Lung v. Freeman, 92 U.S. 275. Written by 
Christine Hoang, Aiice Liu Cook, LiLan Ren, and 
Leng Wong - and directed by Wong for Lucky Chaos. 
Fri.-Sat, Aug. 8-9 & Sep. 5-6, 8pm. Salvage Vanguard 
Theater, 2803 Manor Rd., 512/474-7886. $15. 
www.iuckychaos.com. 

FIDDLER ON THE ROOF Austin Jewish Repertory 
Theater and the Trinity Street Piayers Join forces to 
present this beloved musical on its 50th anniversary. 
Directed by Adam Roberts. Through Aug. 31. Thu. 

& Sat, 8pm; Sun., 2pm. Trinity Street Theatre, 

901 Trinity St, 512/402-3086. Donations accepted. 
www.trinitystreetpiayers.com. 

THE WHO’S TOMMY Pete Townshend’s classic 
musical, of course, in which “Tommy falls down the 
rabbit hole into a rock-n-roll landscape where the 
‘deaf, dumb, and blind kid’ encounters Uncle Ernie 
the Mad Hatter, his mother the White Queen, Cousin 
Kevin the Cheshire Cat, the Acid Red Queen, and his 
doctors Tweedle Dee & Tweedle Dum.” Directed by 
Dave Steakiey. You know the drill: Touch me, feel me, 
reserve your tickets. See p.34 for review. Through 
Aug. 24. Wed. -Sat, 7:30pm; Sun., 2:30pm. Zach 
Theatre, 1510 Toomey, 512/476-0541. $25-75. 
www.zachtheatre.org. 


WE PLAY CHEKHOV: TWO SHORT STORIES 

Breaking String Theatre, the fiercest pur- 
veyors of Russian plays (vintage and con- 
temporary) in this town, present a couple of 
Chekhov short stories adapted for the stage, 
directed by Graham Schmidt, and performed 
by the cream of Austin’s acting crop. “The 
Black Monk” is about an aging scholar who 
is visited by an apparition in the form of a 
monk; “The Beyonce” is Eliza Bent’s take 
on the maestro’s “The Fiancee.” Aug. 14-24. 
Wed. -Sat, 8pm; Sun., 5pm. Long Center 
for the Performing Arts, 701 W. Riverside, 
512/457-5100. $20-40 (pay-what-you-can, 
Aug. 18 & 20). www.breakingstring.com. 


IN THE CLUBS 


COLDTOWNE THEATER 4803 B Airport, 

512/814-8696. www.coidtownetheater.com. 

Brain Trust and Shackeitown Two troupes mining 
that rare improv gold. Thu., 8:30pm. $5. Highdeas 
God damn, what have they been smoking? Thu., 
10pm. $5. Movie Riot: Spinoff Summer You chose 
the movie, they’ll do the spinoff. Fri., 7pm. $5. 

Bad Boys, featuring good improv by boys who are, 
well, other than polite, let’s say. Fri., 8:30pm. $5. 
Live at CoidTowne is stand-up comedy. Fri., 10pm. 
Improv Fantasy League A monthlong tournament 
of champions. Sat, 8:30pm. $7-10. The Frank 
Mills and their smart, character-driven improv, with 
the sketchers of Midnight Society. Sat, 10pm. $7. 
Nice Astronaut: Improvioke Sat, 11pm. Pay what 
you wish. Aaaaand don’t forget the rest o’ the 
week, with Oh, Science! on Sundays and Miller 
and Purselley on Wednesdays and - yes, check 
the website! 

ESTHER’S FOLLIES 525 E. Sixth, 512/320-0198. 

www.esthersfollies.com. 

New Summer Shows Musical comedy skits, 
magic, and a political satirical revue with the bus- 
tling backdrop of Sixth Street on view through the 
stagefront window! So many rollicking send-ups in 
this month’s fresh line-up. Hillary is dodging ques- 
tions about Benghazi and steering towards the 
White House, with Bill riding shotgun in “On the 
Road Again”; and the FLOTUS takes the spotlight 
in “Michelle’s Turn.” Bonus: the large-scale won- 
ders and arch antics of magician Ray Anderson, 
now featuring his “Eclipse” and “Modern Art” 
illusions. Reservations recommended. Thu., 8pm; 
Fri.-Sat, 8 & 10pm. $24-29. 

THE HIDEOUT THEATRE 617 Congress, 

512/47 6-0473 . www.hideouttheatre.com . 

The Threefer Three improv troupes, yes. Thu., 

8pm. $5. Free Fringe Just about anything goes, 
here, because yes. Thu., 10pm. Free. Pick Your 
Own Path Just like you’d choose your own adven- 
ture, wink-wink, nudge-nudge. Fri., 7:30pm. $5. 

The Big Bash Some of the best performers in 
town - an improv dream team - invite you to 
this party on the stage. Fri., 8pm. $15. Pgraph 
Presents Parallelogramophonograph shares the 
stage with In Our Prime. Fri., 10pm. $10. The Dahl 
House Merrily, they Roald along! Sat, 6pm. $10. 
International improv Experience More than 20 
partner theatres around the world issue improv 
challenges to these Austin improvisers. Sat, 8pm. 
$12. Maestro A whole stageful of wild imps, bat- 
tling for victory. Always recommended, especially if 
it’s your first time seeing live improv. Sat, 10pm. 
$12. The Weekender with the Tastemakers head- 
lining. Sun., 8pm. $5. 

INSTITUTION THEATER 3708 Woodbury, 

512/895-9580. www.theinstitutiontheater.com. 

6n$6Rsens 

iHrMnsdMusiuispiEtnt! 

Scrimmage Teams explore Harold-inspired long- 
form improvisation - now with the Honey Ladies. 
Through Aug. 7. Thu., 8pm. $5. Date Night In 
which Regina Soto and Jo Chauvin host a variety 
show about the awkward garden where relation- 
ships bloom. Fridays, 8pm. Through Aug. 22. $12. 
Batshyt Crazy: Live Rude Puppets Yes, you read 
that right. Fridays, 10pm. Through Aug. 22. $10. 
Girls Girls Girls: The Boys of Summer Those lovely 
lilting ladies who do improv musicals? Here’s their 
annual outing with a new male guest star each 
week. This week: Joe Parsons. Saturdays, 8pm; 


54 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE AUGUSTS, 2014 austinchronicle.com 



CAP CITY COMEDY CLUB 8120 Research #100, 

512/467-2333. www.capcitycomedy.com. 

Ryan Stout It’s a double-Ryan cavalcade of come- 
dy, what with this Stout fellow who won the Boston 
International Comedy Festival’s stand-up comedy 
competition when he was 22 ... and Austin’s own 
Ryan Cownie opening. Aug. 7-9. Thu.-Fri., 8pm; Sat, 
8 & 10:30pm. $10-17. 

Chick Shtick The best female stand-ups in the 
ATX? Of course they’re right here under the Cap 
City roof, standing up and making you laugh. Wed., 
Aug. 13, 8pm. $5-9. 







Octia of the Pink Ocean Cosplay Expo 


Yes, this is the screening of a new feature film, 
but we’re including it in the theatre listings section. 

Because it was created and composed by Chad 
Salvata and directed by Bonnie Cullum - and they 
and many of the team who worked on this wild under- 
sea fantasy are the same people who’ve brought the 
world those unforgettable original stage productions 
Elytra, Vampyress, the X&Y Trilogy, and more. Listen: 
“In the world of the Pink Ocean and its islands, the 
goddess Karnika seeks her memory and identity. Join- 
ing with sovereign Octia to battle Mermecho and the 
destructive forces that are mechanizing the world and 
creating the Blackening.” Cybernetic opera is what 
they call it, and here’s the first Ethos foray into the 
world of cinema with that vivid genre. Note: Audience 
feedback is solicited for this a I most-complete preview, 
to help finesse the final edits. Aug. 10-23. Nightly, 
8pm. Extra screenings: Fri.-Sat, 10pm. $10. 


This Vortex event runs in con- 
junction with the debut of the new 
Ethos fantasy film, Octia of the 
Pink Ocean, and features vendors, 
crafty artists, workshops, speak- 
ers, and nightly screenings of 
that 80-minute movie. Workshops 
include: How to Make Leather 
Gauntlets; Headgear for Heroes; 
Fantasy Makeup Design and 
Application; Fantasy Genitalia; 
Cybernetic Movement; and 
more. Designers and actors from 
Octia of the Pink Ocean will be in 
attendance in costume to provide 
instruction. See p.30 for more. 
Aug. 10-17. Nightly, 5pm-12mid. 
$15-50. 


The Vortex, 2307 Manor Rd., 512/478-5282. www.vortexrep.org. 









by Chuck Shepherd 



In July, the large cement “Humpty Dumpty" at the Enchanted Forest in 
Salem, Ore., created by Roger Tofte in 1970, was destroyed when two intruders 
tried to climb the wall Humpty was sitting on. However, the wall crumbled and 
Humpty suffered a great fall, and Tofte said he doubted he could put Humpty 
back together again, but would try instead to make a new one. 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 


CAT NANNY 

Facial recognition software, increasingly 
important to global anti-terrorism operations, 
is being brought to ... cats. Taiwanese devel- 
oper Mu-Chi Sung announced in July plans for 
marketing the software as part of a cat 
health device so that owners, especially 
those with multiple cats, can better monitor 
their cats’ eating habits. Sung first had to 
overcome the problem of how to get the cat 
to stick its head through a slot in the feeder 
so the software can start to work. The device, 
with mobile apps for remote monitoring by the 
owner, may sell for about $250. 

GOVERNMENT IN ACTION 

The Environmental Protection Agency is 
already a “News of the Weird” favorite (for 
example, the secret goofing-off “man cave” of 
one EPA contractor in July 2013 and, two 
months later, the fabulist EPA executive who 
skipped agency work for months by claiming 
falsely to be on secret CIA missions), but the 
agency’s Denver regional office took it to 
another level in June. In a leaked memo, the 
Denver deputy director implored employees to 
end the practice of leaving feces in the 
office’s hallway. The memo referred to “sever- 
al” incidents. 

The federal food stamps program, appar- 
ently uncontrollably rife with waste, has 
resorted to giving financial rewards to the 
states that misspend food stamp money the 
least. In July, the Florida Department of 
Children and Families, beaming with pride, 
announced it had won a federal grant of $7 
million for having blown only $47 million in 


food stamp benefits in 2013 (less than 1% of 
its $6 billion in payments). Vermont, the 
worst-performing state, misspends almost 
10% of its food stamp benefits. 

The Way the World Works: The U.S. 
Occupational Safety and Health 
Administration came down hard in July on 
West Virginia’s Freedom Industries for viola- 
tions of chemical safety standards in January 
2014 that resulted in the 10-day contamina- 
tion of drinking water for 300,000 residents. 
OSHA issued two fines to the company - one 
for $7,000 and the other for $4,000. 

GREAT ART! 

Ms. Milo Moire, a Swiss performance artist, 
startled (and puzzled) fairgoers at Germany’s 
Art Cologne in April by creating a painting 
while standing on two ladders, nude and 
expelling “eggs,” filled with paint and ink, 
from her vagina. Each “PlopEgg” canvas 
made what she called a powerful feminist 
statement about women, fertility, and creativi- 
ty. (In June, she attempted to tour 
Switzerland’s Art Basel fair “wearing” only the 
names of clothing items written on her nude 
body, e.g., on her leg, the word “pants.” 
Officials told her to go get dressed if she 
wanted to see the show.) 

Update: Critics praised bad-girl British artist 
Tracey Emin’s 1998 furniture-and-effects 
exhibit, “My Bed,” representing a failed 
romantic relationship, featuring mussed 
sheets and, littering the room, empty vodka 
bottles and used condoms. Prominent collec- 
tor Charles Saatchi turned heads when he 
bought the piece for the equivalent of about 


$200,000, and in June, almost 15 years 
later, he sold “My Bed” at auction for the 
equivalent of $4,330,000. 

THAT’S ENTERTAINMENT! 

Sheriff’s deputies in Salina, Kan., arrested 
Aaron Jansen, 29, but not before he put on 
quite a show on July 5. Jansen, speeding in a 
car spray-painted with derogatory comments 
about law enforcement, refused to pull over 
and even survived a series of tire-shredding 
road spikes as he turned into a soybean field, 
where he revved the engine and drove in cir- 
cles for 40 minutes. As deputies set up a 
perimeter, Jansen futilely tossed items from 
the car (blankets, CDs, anything available) 
and then (with the car still moving) climbed 
out the driver’s door and briefly “surfed” on 
the roof. Finally, as deputies closed in, 

Jansen shouted a barrage of Bible verses 
before emerging from the car wearing a cow- 
boy hat, boots, and a dress. 

The surveillance video in evidence in 
England’s Wolverhampton Crown Court in 
July captured the entire caper of two young 
men comically failing to open a parking lot’s 
automated cash machine five months earlier. 
Wearing hoods, they tried to batter the 
secure machine open, then tried to pull it 
away (but learned that it was rooted to an 
underground cable). Plan C involved getting 
in their Peugeot and ramming the machine, 
which did knock loose the money-dispensing 
component - but also shredded part of the 
car’s body. The dispenser (with the equiva- 
lent of $1,500 in coins) fit in the front seat 
only after some exhaustive pushing and 
cramming, but finally the men drove off - 
with sparks flying as the weight of the coins 
made the crippled car scrape the pavement. 
Police arrived on the scene, and a brief 
chase ended when the car crashed into a 
wall. Final score: car totaled, money recov- 
ered, and Wesley Bristow, 25, sentenced to 
two years in prison. 

BAD, BAD SAMARITAN! 

1) Roy Ortiz hired a lawyer in March and 
said he was considering suing the first 
responders who rescued him during the his- 
toric September 2013 flooding around 
Broomfield, Colo. - because they failed to 
find him fast enough when his car plunged 
into raging waters. 2) In March, Houston 
sheriff’s deputy Brady Pullen filed a lawsuit 
against the grieving family of the delusional 
man he was forced to shoot and kill during a 
2012 emergency call - because Pullen had 
been injured in the skirmish and believes 
the family failed to warn him Just how dan- 
gerous Kemal Yazar was. Also, in Alcona, 
Ontario, in April, Sharlene Simon, 42, filed a 
lawsuit against the family of the teenage 
bicyclist she accidentally ran down, fatally, in 
2012 - claiming that the boy’s dangerous 
Joyriding at 1:30am initiated the events that 
left her traumatized. 


Visit Chuck Shepherd daiiy at 

WWW. newsof th ewei rd . blogspot.com 
(or www.newsoftheweird.comj. 

Send your weird news to: Chuck Shepherd, PC Box 
18737, Tampa, FL 33679 or weirdnewstips@yahoo.com. 
©2014 Universai Press Syndicate 


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austinchronicle.com AUGUST 8, 2014 the Austin chronicle 55 






LISTINGS 


Through Aug. 23. $12. Fresh Roasted A sort of 
Austintatious PeeWee’s Playhouse from the mind 
of Brandon Martin - with a coffee machine called 
Neil Decaf Tyson. Saturdays, 10pm. Through Aug. 
23. $10. 

NEW MOVEMENT THEATER 616 Lavaca, 

512/788-2669. www.newmovementtheater.com. 

Student Union with Cardigans. Thu., 7pm. Free. 
Lights Up Three improv troupes! Thu., 8pm. 

$5. Block Party. Comedy open mic, hosted by 
Terance McDavid and Yusef Roach. Thu., 9:30pm. 
$5-7. The Neighborhood The original TNM house 
sketch troupe! Fri., 8pm. $7-10. Megan Simon: 
Impressionable Fri., 9pm. $7-10. Plugged: Selling 
Out Fri., 10:30pm. $5-7. TNMTV: Made-for-TV 
Movie Sat, 8pm. $5. Handbomb Explosive com- 
edy. Sat, 9pm. $7-10. The Megaphone Show 
Sat, 10:30pm. $5. Pass the Mic It’s stand-up 
with a twist. Sun., 8pm. $5. ... And you know the 
Opposites do their thing on Wednesday nights, 
right? Wed., 8pm. $5. See website for more. 
VELVEETA ROOM 521 E. Sixth, 512/469- 
9116. www.thevelveetaroom.com. 

Fh'iday Latenight Avery Moore 
showcases some of the best 
stand-ups working toward the 
blue end of the spectrum. 

Fridays, 11pm. 

Mike Merryfield None k 

other than Louis CK told ^ 

this comic: “You kill and ^ 

I’m tired of following you.” You jL\ 
need a better recommendation, 
get the fuck outta here. Bonus: 

Pat Dean opens. Aug. 8-9. Fri., 

9pm; Sat, 9 & 11pm. $10. 

BUT WAIT - THERE’S 
MORE! 

SURE THING A stand-up showcase hosted by 
Duncan Carson and Brendan K. O’Grady. You need 
to know more than that, Austinite, you don’t know 
what’s funny. Saturdays, 8pm. Austin Java, 

1206 Parkway, 512/476-1829. www.austinjava.com. 

AVALANCHE COMEDY And this comedy showcase 
is hosted by Ryan Cownie. Mondays, 9pm. Hoiy 
Mountain, 617 E. Seventh, 512/391-1943. 

www.holymountainaustin.com . 



JAZZ CIGARETTE This stand-up showcase is hosted 
by Joe Hafkey and Mac Blake. Yes, that means it’s 
recommended. Duh. Mon., Aug. 11, 9:30pm. Spider 
House Ballroom, 2906 Fruth, 512/480-9562. $5 ($2, 
students), www.spiderhousecafe.com. 

LOOKING FOR DANCE CLASSES? Swing? Ballet? 
Tango? Pole-dancing? We’ve got a myriad of classes 
listed online, all manner of schools waiting to get 
your feet firmly on the floor to joyful moves. 

AUSTIN SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA: FREE CON- 
CERTS IN THE PARK Each Sunday a different ensem- 
ble of the ASO will be featured at Hartman Park on 
the grounds of the Long Center, performing music 
from Jazz and light classical to pops selections and 
film scores. Pro tip: Bring a picnic dinner and 
blanket and make it a group outing. Through 
Aug. 24. Sundays, 7:30pm. Long Center 
for the Performing Arts, 701 W. Riverside, 
512/457-5100. www.thelongcenter.org. 




ALART 


EVENTS 

THE POSTER ART OF GABE VAUGHN 

A showcase of designs from an artist 
whose work focuses heavily on music 
and music culture? Sounds like Austin - 
but when the graphics are this good, it’s not 
Just the same ol’ same ol’. Reception: Thu., Aug. 

7, 8pm. Circa 13, 2700 W. Anderson. 

OPENING 

IMAGINE ART: THE OUTSIDERS New works by art 
ists with disabilities, with a focus on outsider art. 
Reception: Thu., Aug. 14, 6-8pm. 2830 Real, 
512/448-1840. www.imagineart.net. 

OLD BAKERY ART GALLERY: AUSTIN ARTISTS @ 
WORK New work from this creative group, with piec- 


Armadillo World 
Headquarters 
44th Anniversary 
Celebration 

Well of course this sensational shindig is 
happening at SouthPop, and of course the 
live music is from Shiva’s Headband, with 
introductions by JFKLN. (And, yes, you can 
see the current Ken Hoge photo exhibition 
while you’re partying.) Because this is - and 
was - Austin! Thu., Aug. 7, 7:09pm. 
1516-B S. Lamar, 512/440-8318. 

www.samopc.org. 



es by Pat Molina, Cat Quintanilla, Raquel Cordon, 
David French, Jonathon Grider, Larry Jolly, John 
Mark Luke, Lauren Pomatto, Jo Lene Ropiak, and 

others. Reception: Fri., Aug. 8, 5-7pm. 1006 Congress, 
512/477-5961. 

WALLY WORKMAN GALLERY: FLORA AND FAUNA 

German-born artist Anne Siems creates portraits 
of the human figure and the old-growth flora of the 
Pacific Northwest she now calls home, her delicate 
yet complex works resonant of European Masters, 
Early American Folk Art, and vintage photography. 
Reception: Sat, Aug. 9, 6-8pm. Exhibition: through 
Aug. 30. 1202 W. Sixth, 512/472-7428. 
www.wallyworkmangallery.com. 

YARD DOG FOLK ART: THE COUNTRY SOUL 
BROTHERHOOD The woodblock prints of Jeb Ley 
Nichols explore the musical meeting place where 
country and soul got together. Bonus: For the recep- 
tion, there’s also a one-night-only show of the dog 
paintings of Walter Salas-Humara and the bear paint- 
ings of Jon Dee Graham - with live music from the 
two artists. Reception: Thu., Aug. 7, 7-9pm. 

1510 S. Congress, 512/912-1613. www.yarddog.com. 


CLOSING 

GRAYDUCK GALLERY: GOODLY/WICKED 

Co-curated (with Sarah C. Bancroft) by frequent 
Chron contributor Andy Campbell, this show includes 
works by Katy Horan, Bug Davidson, Jeana Baum- 
gardner, Robert Jackson Harrington, H I X X Collect- 
ive (Rachel Crist & Daedalus Hoffman), Masumi 
Kataoka, Olivia Moore, and Teruko Nimura. Through 
Aug. 10. 2213 E. Cesar Chavez, 512/826-5334. 
www.grayduckgallery.com. 

THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN: ADVANCED YOUNG 
ARTISTS First, note that the Contemporary’s install- 
ing this exhibition (of work by teen artists and their 
professional mentors) at Pump Project, OK? Because 
you don’t wanna miss it, especially not when the 
likes of Michael Anthony Garcia, Virginia Fleck, 
Johnny Villarreal, and Lindsay Palmer are among the 
mentors of these fierce young creatives. Through Aug. 
9. Sat & Wed., noon-5pm. 702 Shady. 
www.thecontemporaryaustin.org. 



OH, YOU’VE REOPENED? We hope 

you’ve retained that nnanly Greco-Roman vibe. 




BRIGHT NOW BEYOND The Chronicle’s own theatre 
daddy, Robert Faires (the Scarecrow) Joins Jomama 
Jones (Ozma) in Daniel Alexander Jones and Bobby 
Halvorson’s wicked take on the next chapters of the 
land of Oz. Thu.-Sat, July 31-Aug. 23, 8pm. Salvage 
Vanguard Theater, 2803 Manor Rd., 512/474-7886. 
$20; $15 students w/ ID; 2-for-l tickets, July 31 and 
Aug. 7; $50, VIP, Aug. 9 only, brightnowbeyond.bpt.me. 

CHAIN DRIVE GRAND REOPENING Hey pigs, check 
out the new digs of Austin’s old-school leather bar, 
right around the corner from the old one and in the 
old Agora Sports Bar/Rainey’s Backyard. Chain Drive, 
84 East (Southbound 1-35 access road), 512/480-9017. 
BYOB 'til the permit kicks in. www.chain-drive.com. 


FOXYQUEERS AT THE W It’s a new group of foxes 
and queers ... or queer foxes, and this week, they 
invite you to the rooftop pool at the W, the WET Deck. 
It takes a separate RSVR but it’s worth the clicks. 

Thu., Aug. 7, 5-8:30pm. The W Hotel. Search Foxyqueers 
on Facebook. www.whoteiaustin.com/forms/ondeck. 

THE Q GRAND OPENING Open house for Austin’s 
young dude drop-in center. Fri., Aug. 8, 6-9pm. 

The Q, 2906 Medical Arts, www.fb.com/theqaustin. 

NOCTUARY Gigi Grinstad’s indoor forest featuring 
Katie Rose Pipkin. Fri., Aug. 8, 8pm-12mid. 

Little Pink Monster Gallery, 1913 E. 

17th, 512/810-8281. www.fb.com/ 
iittiepinkmonstergaiiery. 

THE GLAM SQUAD Glam is 
queen once a month at BT II. 

Second Saturdays. Bout Time 
II, 6607 N. 1-35. 
www.bouttime2.com. 

MIMOSA SUNDAY Come 
get a big XO from Dan X.O. 
and the crew as you schluck 
back some free, yummy OJ 
y Champers, that glorious 
Sunday morning concoction 
otherwise known as the mimo- 
sa. No purchase necessary, but 
we see you buried knee-deep in the 
aisles. Summer Sundays, lOam-lpm. 

Tapelenders Video, 1114 W. Fifth ff201, 

512/472-0844. Free, www.tapeienders.com. 

SUPER SUNDAYS DIVAS W/ DETOX Join divas Kelly 
Kline and Jenny McCall for a night of divinity, featur- 
ing a special guest each week. This week: Detox 
from RuPaul’s Drag Race. Sundays, 10:30pm. Oilcan 
Harry’s, 211 W. Fourth. Free, www.oiicanharrys.com. 

TUEZGAYZ Dependably fruitastic: Austin’s legendary 
weekly weekday gay night on Red River. Tuesdays, 

9pm. Barbarella, 615 Red River, 512/476-7766. 

www.fb.com/barbareiiaatx. 

COMPETITIVE OPEN PLAY Just as it sounds, gay 
Austin b-ballers. Join in on the dribble. Tue.,Aug. 12, 


6-9pm. First United Methodist Church, 1201 Lavaca, 
512/478-5684. www.fb.com/atxgbi. 

PFLAG NORTH MONTHLY MEETING Meet and greet 
with fellow allies in the cause for love. Second Tuesday 
of every month, 6:45pm. Live Oak Unitarian Universalist 
Church, 3315 El Salido, Cedar Park, 512/302-3524. 
Free, www.pfiag-austin.org, www.straightforequaiity.org. 

POP TRIVIA TUESDAY Lady Crackle Birdbreath and 
Nadine Hughes want to pop your hairy pop cherry 
and then some at this capital Q quiz. Mention our 
peeps at Austin Pride for 1C% off chow. 
Second Tuesdays, 7-9pm. Boardwalk 
Burgers & Fries, 3103 S. Lamar, www. 
austinpride.org. 

JULIE NOLEN’S MIDNIGHT 
SPECIAL Come support 
Julie’s late-night gig so she 
can eventually play earlier. 
Tuesdays in July, 11:45pm- 
1:45am. Saxon Pub, 1320 S. 
Lamar, 512/448-2552. $5. 
www.fb.com/Juiienoienmusic, 
www.Juiienoien.com. 

THIS IS THE PLACE 

Lesbutante & the Boss say: 
Get social! Get down! Get 
funky! Get crunk! Come dance 
like Shane and Alice at the cast 
party for Lez Girls] Wed., Aug. 13, 7pm. 
Upstairs on Trinity, 601 Trinity. 
www.fb.com/theiesbutanteandtheboss. 

NATIONAL KARAOKE LEAGUE Sing it, sang it, and 
swang it! Wednesdays, 8-lOpm. Rain on 4th, 

217 W. Fourth. Free. 

BINGO & DRAG/POOL TOURNEY Enjoy balls in dark 
little pockets and/or big hair to make you stare each 
hump day. Wednesdays: Bingo & Drag, 8pm; pool, 

9pm. Bout Time II, 6607 N. 1-35. www.bouttime2.com. 

RELIGION & THE LGBT COMMUNITY Join the 
Log Cabin crew as they host speakers Rev. Alycia 
Erickson with MCC Austin and Pastor Ron Trimmer 
with Hope United Georgetown. Thu., Aug. 14, 6-8pm. 



56 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE AUGUSTS, 2014 austinchronicle.com 


The Departure Lounge, 311 W. Fifth ffl02. Free. 

president@iogcabinaustin.us, www.fb.com/iogcabinaustin. 

PFLAG SOUTH MONTHLY MEETING Family is nice; 
allied family is love. PFLAG represents the best of 
our community. Second Thursdays, 6:30-9pm. Faith 
Presbyterian Church, 1314 E. Oltorf. Free. 




REGISTER FOR AIDS WALK 2014 Sun., Oct. 19. 
Republic Square Park, 422 Guadalupe. 
www.aidswaikaustin.org. 

LGBT BEACH CAMPOUT IN CORPUS Beach baby, 
beach baby, come see the sun rise with family. It’s 
a weekend-long campout right on water’s edge with 
a buncha queers in Corpus. Fri.-Sun., Aug. 15-17. Off 
Zahn Road at Packery Channel. Search Facebook for 
the event “LGBT San Antonio PRIDE Camping on the 
Beach Event in C.C. TX.” 

SEX TOY RECYCLING Every closet purge, you run 
into it - that slab of silicone or whatever, the one 
that reminds you of ... you know who. What the hell 
do you do with an old dong? Cr buzzing egg? Cr 
Fleshlight? Why, you recycle it, of course. Participate 
in Q Toys recycling program, and get a $5 certificate 
for your trouble ... and for a less stressful closet. 

Q Toys, 6800 Burnet Rd. www.qtoysaustin.com. 

SAN MARCOS PRIDE 2014 NEEDS YOU! All s they 
need is you. Hey, Bobcat Qs, allies, and Austinites 
who just want to see neighbor pals enjoy the luv we 
feel here in the big city, come lend a hand and help 
our pals in SMTX. San Marcos Pride seeks volun- 
teers, performers, graphic designers and printers, 
hotel partnerships, vendors, and especially $ponsor$. 
Call or email Silvia. Fri.-Sun., Sept. 5-7. 512/644- 
5637. syisandovai@gmaii.com. 


Send g^y bits to gayplace@austinchronicle.com. 
See the full array of Gay Place listings at 
austinchronicie.com/gay. 







LISTINGS 



LINK & PIN; BETWEEN SPACE & TIME 

New works Leslie Kell and Greta Olivas. 

Reception: Fri.,Aug. 8, 6-8pm. Exhibition: 
through Aug. 30. Thu. -Sat, 2-6pm. 2235 E. Sixth. 
512/900-8952. www.linkpinart.com. 


ONGOING 

02 GALLERY: WALL DEPENDENT? Works by Texas- 

based artists Orna Feinstein, Jonathan Leach, 

Edward Lane McCartney, and Charlotte Smith 

include two-dimensional wall works, three-dimensional 
wall works, and fully sculptural installations. Closing 
reception: Fri., Aug. 22, 5:30-8pm. 2830 E. MLK, 
512/477-9328. www.camibaart.com. 

ART.SCIENCE.GALLERY: LIFECYCLES The amazing 
sculptures of John Self and Matt Norris. It’s an inva- 
sion of metal arthropods and more! Through Aug. 31. 
Tue.-Sat, noon-Gpm. In the Canopy compound, 

916 Springdale #102. www.artsciencegallery.com. 

COMMON HOUSE: FOR YOU, UNEARTHED, THE 
DIRT, MY HANDS New works by Tamara Becerra 
Valdez and Andrea Bonin explore themes of nostalgia 
and intimacy through manipulated materials. 

906 E. 49th. www.common-house.com. 

O THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN: A SECRET 
AFFAIR Looking for art of international impact? At 
the Jones Center, behold an array of world-class 
marvels from the private collection of Glenn and 
Amanda Fuhrman: works by Matthew Barney, 
Maurizio Cattelan, Louise Bourgeois, Jim Hodges, 
Anish Kapoor, Ron Mueck, Juan Munoz, Marc Quinn, 
YInka Shonibare MBE, KIkl Smith, Gillian Wearing, 
and more, exploring themes of the body, the figure, 
and relationships. Through Aug. 24. 700 Congress. At 


AUGUST 6 -SEPTEMBER 17 

Original Work by San Antonio Artist 

Rebecca Hernandez 
Morgan 

reception: SATURDAY, AUGUST 16, 6pm 



Native Impulse 

HALCYON 

COFFEE I BAR I LOUNGE 218 W. 4th St. « 

rhmstudiogallery@gnnail.com rhmstudiogallery.com ^ * 


Laguna Gloria, feast your senses on the land-hugging, 
lobster-netted, site-specific installation “Current” 
by Orly Genger. Through Aug. 24. 3809 W. 35th, 
512/453-5312. www.thecontemporaryaustin.org. 

DAVIS GALLERY: ALL SUMMER LONG This group 
show boasts the talented Jan Heaton, Randall Reid, 
and David Leonard among its more-than-a-dozen 
artists. Recommended. Through Aug. 30. Mon.-Fri., 
10am-6pm; Sat, 10am-4pm. 837 W. 12th, 
512/477-4929. www.davisgalleryaustin.com. 

O FLATBED PRESS: SUMMER SELECTIONS This 

show boasts a wide array of prints from local and 
International artists who’ve worked at Flatbed during 
the past two-and-a-half decades. Highly recommend- 
ed. Through Sept 13. 2830 E. MLK, 512/477-9328. 

www.flatbedpress.com . 

GALLERY BLACK LAGOON: AWKWARD YOUTH 

E.S. Olsen captures the faces of youth with a cari- 
cature narrative that reveals the truth about this 
age; David Lujan’s half-printed monotypes highlight 
the personality of young animals. Through Aug. 17. 
4301-A Guadalupe, 512/534-6719. 
www.galleryblacklagoon.com. 

GALLERY BLACK LAGOON: EXPLORATION & VICE 

Padaric Kolander’s textural paintings evoke warbly 
evenings of the Thirties; Gina Gwen Palacios’ oil 
painting expands the landscape of her ancestry 
through exploration and the creation of her own his- 
tory. Through Aug. 24. 4301-A Guadalupe, 
512/534-6719. www.galleryblacklagoon.com. 

LORA REYNOLDS GALLERY: SUMMER SHOW This 
group show at the elegant gallery Downtown features 
works by Colby Bird, Richard Forster, Roy McMakIn, 
Frank Selby, and other artists. Through Sept 6. 

360 Nueces #50, 512/215-4965. www.lorareynolds.com. 

MACC: TWO NEW SHOWS What new wonders are 
displayed within the walls of the Mexican American 
Cultural Center? In the Coronado Gallery: “Caminos 
Compartidos (Shared Paths)” by Oscar Silva and 
Patricia Green. In the Community Gallery: “Delirio 
Fantastico (Fantastic Delirium)” by Manuel Miranda. 
600 River, 512/974-3772. www.maccaustin.org. 

MEXIC-ARTE: YOUNG LATINA ARTISTS 19 Curated 
by the Mas Rudas Chicana art collective of San 
Antonio, this exhibition presents Latina artists culti- 



Enroll Today! 


Learn song, 
dance and 
drumming and 
lift your spirit! 
A great family 
activity. 


Puerto Rican Folkloric 
Dance & Cultural Center 
701 Tillery St. 

(512) 251-8122 - prfdance.org 




austinchronicle.com AUGUST 8, 2014 the Austin chronicle 57 


This August 

Live Your Fantasy 




THE VORTEX 
COSPLAY Expo 

august 10-16, i014 
5 pm - Midnight 

$25 Unlimited pas$ 


Octia of the Pinfe Ocean 

A /Veu; C/berOpera Fantasy Rfm 
by Ethos 

August 10-23 

$10 

For Mature Audiences Onb* 


TICKETS AND INFORMATION AT OtTIATHEMOVIE.COM 






LISTINGS 


vating artistic vocabularies to understand the world 
around them. Featuring new works by Natalia Anciso, 
Daphne Arthur, Nani Chacon, Audrya Flores, Suzy 
Gonzalez, and more. Through Sep. 7. 419 Congress, 
512/480-9373. $5 ($4, seniors, students; free, 
Sundays), www.mexic-artemuseum.org. 

O THE MUSEUM OF NATURAL & ARTIFICIAL 
EPHEMERATA: GRAND REOPENING What has got 
to be the most charming - and charmed - museum 
in Austin celebrates its renascence with an evening 
of curator-led tours of the venue’s new “Impermanent 
Collection” and live music by Jim Ragland. Tours by 
appointment. 1808 Singieton, 512/320-0566. $5. 
www.mnae.org. 

O SOUTHPOP: MAN ON A MISSION The South 
Austin Popular Culture Center presents a fine retro- 
spective of Ken Hoge’s music posters from back in the 
wild, pre-digital days, promoting gigs at Antone’s Home 
of the Blues, the Armadillo World Headquarters, 

Soap Creek Saloon, and more - even the Sex Pistols 
at Randy’s Rodeo in San Antonio. Through Sept. 30. 
1516-B S. Lamar, 512/440-8318. www.southpop.org. 

TEXAS STATE HISTORY MUSEUM: THE 1968 
EXHIBIT Photographs, artifacts, vintage pop-culture 
items, and interactive lounges make this show a vast 
wunderkammer of nostalgia and graphic style predi- 
cated on that pivotal year that was. Through Sept. 1. 
1800 Congress, 512/936-4629. www.thestoryoftexas.com. 

UP COLLECTIVE: FRANKS N’ BIEHL A search for 
deeper questions, instead of one answer, propels 
both Jonathan Biehl and Cliff Franks in their art-mak- 
ing process.” See that search-in-progress here. 

2326 E. Cesar Chavez. 512/981-7539. 
www.upcollective.org. 

WOMEN & THEIR WORK: SOFT WALLS Working 
with a minimalist palette, Hawaiian-born artist Akiko 
Kotani has enveloped the gallery walls with thou- 
sands of feet of crocheted plastic, the handcrafted 
encasement flowing off the familiar verticals and 
puddling at the floor. Through Aug. 29. 1710 Lavaca, 
512/477-1064. www.womenandtheirwork.org. 

YARD DOG FOLK ART: WILD BIRDS Calgary artist 
Lisa Brawn offers a stunning collection of avian por- 
traits - rendered as woodcut blocks painted in vivid 
color. 1510 S. Congress, 912-1613. www.yarddog.com. 




READINGS, SIGNINGS, 

AND PERFORMANCES 

BOOKPEOPLE READINGS & SIGNINGS HOPE Book 

Tagging Event Three years of public art and the 
stories around it! Live signing/ tagging by the best art- 
ists! Thu., Aug., 7pm. Write Bloody Showcase Party 
on with Ernest Cline, Cristin O’Keefe Aptowicz, Anis 
Mojgani, Derrick Brown, and more. Fri.,Aug. 8, 7pm. 
Deborah Harkness: The Book of Life Having a great 
time, witch you were here. Sat, Aug. 9, 4pm. Douglas 
Brinkley and Luke Nichter: The Nixon Tapes Hint: 
more than just 18 minutes. See p.30 for more. Wed., 
Aug. 13, 7pm. BookPeopie, 603 N. Lamar, 512/472- 
5050. www.bookpeople.com. 



POETS BY THE POOL For the first time, 
as part of Barton Springs Festival, poets 
will perform around the Three Philosophers 
Statue - hosted by Thom the World Poet. 
Sat, Aug. 9, 10ann-4pnn. Barton Springs Pool, 
2201 Barton Springs Rd., 512/867-3080. 
austintexas.gov. 

FUN PARTY READING SERIES Featuring the works of 

Dan Boehl, Katy Chrisler, and Carrie Hunter, read live 
in that gorgeous Eastside gallery called grayDUCK. Sat, 
Aug. 9, 8pm. grayDUCK Gaiiery, 2213 E. Cesar Chavez, 
512/826-5334. www.grayduckgallery.com . 

5S THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE AUGUST 8, 2014 



Little Pink Monster Gallery: Noctuary 

Installation artist Gigi Grinstad presents a living work of art: A forest indoors. “Forests, 
dogs, rocks, sight, sound, smell.” Bonus: new works by Katie Rose Pipkin. Reception: 
Fri.,Aug. 8, 8pm-12mid. 1913 E. 17th. 512/810-8281. 


all ages, with a music set by SeVana Marimba, fol- 
lowed by some bat watching. Fri., Aug. 8, 7-8:30pm. 
Duncan Park, 900 W. Ninth. Free. 

www.shoalcreekconservancy.org. 

LAKE TRAVIS HOT AIR BALLOON FLIGHT Come 
see the beautiful sight of a bunch of big balloons 
in the sky, courtesy of the Central Texas Ballooning 
Association. Sat, Aug. 9, 6am. Mansfieid Dam Park, 
512/481-2822. Free, www.centraitexasbaiiooning.org. 

BARTON SPRINGS FEST In addition to the cooling 
waters that are so dear to this sweltering city, this 
event has a little something for everyone, including 
live music courtesy of Atash and the Minor Mishap 
Marching Band, speakers, a diving competition, and 
free watermelon to celebrate. Throw in some yoga 
and poetry reading, and you have a uniquely Austin 
happening. Sat, Aug. 9, 8am-7pm. Barton Springs 
Pooi, 2201 Barton Springs Rd., 512/867-3080. 
www.sosaiiiance.org. 

DIVORCE WORKSHOP With the guidance of trained 
professionals, workshop participants will gain a great- 
er understanding of the often confusing divorce pro- 
cess. Sat, Aug. 9, 8am-12:30pm. Riverbend Church, 
4214 Capitai ofTX Hwy. N., 512/477-4707. $45. 
www.divorce-financiai-soiutions.com/workshops. 

STATE LIBRARY & ARCHIVES OPEN FOR 
RESEARCH It’s kinda like office hours except you can 
meet with the official history of the Texas government. 
That means access to newspapers. Journals, books, 
manuscripts, photos, old maps, and other resources 
is at your fingertips. Perfect for that dissertation 
on Texas history or genealogical snooping. Second 
Saturdays of the month, 9am-4pm. Texas State Library 
& Archives, 1201 Brazos, 512/463-5455. Free, www.tsi. 
state.tx.us/news/2013/tsiac-to-open-on-second-saturdays. 
TEXAS HUNTER EDUCATION The class covers 
hunting ethics, safety, and shooting, and results in 
participants being certified to hunt legal game in the 
state of Texas, so long as you purchase a license, of 
course. Sat, Aug. 9, 9am-lpm. Cedar Park Recreation 
Center, 1435 Main St, Cedar Park, 512/401-5514. 
$25. www.cpparks.net. 


RON JAEGER AND JAN MARQUART Jeager, the 
author of the Trilogy of Light {The Secret of the Bermuda 
Triangie; Sharing a Man; and Next Stop, Heaven) reads 
with Austin poet Marquart. Sun., Aug. 10, 2pm. Maivern 
Bookstore, 613 W. 29th. www.malvernbooks.com. 

OPEN MICS 

OPEN MICS Austin Poetry Slam Tuesdays, 8pm. 
Spider House Baiiroom, 2906 Fruth. Spoken & Heard 
Sundays, 7-lOpm. Kick Butt Coffee, 5775 Airport ff725. 

More listed online! 


UPCYCLE THIS! Get crafty and turn someone 
else’s trash into your treasure. First Thursdays, 6pm. 
Recycied Reads, 5335 Burnet Rd., 512/974-7400. 
Free, www.recycledreads.org. 

PAY IT FORWARD WITH DANIEL CURTIS The 

Spazmatics will perform and Austin’s top chefs will 
serve signature dishes along with Tipsy Texan cock- 
tails and Casa Brasil coffee drinks to benefit the 
work of the Lone Star Paralysis Foundation. Reserve 
online. Thu., Aug. 7, 6-lOpm. AT&T Executive Education 
and Conference Center, 1900 University Avenue, 
512/404-1900. $75-125. www.payitfonvardwithdaniel.org. 

TIPS AND TRICKS TO BUDGET TRAVEL This class 
will pull from the experiences of veterans of the travel 
industry and seasoned travelers. Learn about great 
websites to check out, what days to fly, and the times 
of year to get better prices. Thu., Aug. 7, 6:30-8pm. 
REI, 601 N. Lamar, 512/444-2294. Free. 
www.meetup.com/Hostelling-lnternational-Austin-Travel- 
Events-Club/events/194899202/. 

‘AUSTIN MONTHLY’ BACHELOR PARTY Oh sure, 
there will be food, drinks, music, dancing, and cus- 
tom caricatures, but the real draw is the bachelor 
auction. Bring your wallet because these eligible men 
are selling their availability to raise funds for the 
Shade Project. Thu., Aug. 7, 7-10:30pm. W Austin, 

200 Lavaca. $40-100. www.austinmonthiy.com. 

CRYPTOPARTY Do you know what Tor is? Would you 
like to learn about digital privacy rights? This informal 
session is open to people of all computer literacy. 
Thu., Aug. 7, 7pm. Locai 301, 301 Chicon. Free. 

www.cryptopartyatx.org. 

TAX-FREE WEEKEND Everything you need to go back 
to school will not be taxed this weekend: clothes, 
notebooks, crayons, glue, etc. Go online for a com- 
plete list of items free from the heavy hand of the 
man. Fri.-Sun., Aug. 8-10. www.window.state.tx.us. 


austinchronicle.com 


ANIME OVERLOAD No surprises here. Just a whole 
heck-of-a-lot of Japanese animation and pop-culture 
events, panels, and workshops. We imagine there will 
be no shortage of outlandish costumes as well. Fri.-Sun., 
Aug. 8-10. Hoiiday Inn Midtown, 6000 Middle Fiskville, 
512/451-5757. $30. www.animeoverioad.net. 

SHOAL CREEK CELEBRATION Join the Shoal Creek 
Conservancy as they host a summer celebration for 


AWESMIC CITY EXPO There will be keynote speak- 
ers, workshops, a peace wave concert, and much 
more at this expo of peace, the cosmos, and bongos. 
Patchouli optional. Sat-Sun., Aug. 9-10. Palmer Events 
Center, 900 Barton Springs Rd., 888/509-8872. 

$5-10. www.awesmiccityexpo2014.com. 

ICE CREAM FESTIVAL Kinda like the Hot Sauce 
Festival but less masochistic. All your favorite pur- 


Day Trips 



BY GERALD E. MCLEOD 


The Green Bay Packers ° 

Shareholders Meeting is not o 

a very exclusive affair. There are 
363,948 owners of the publicly ^ 

owned NFL franchise, and they 
were all invited to Green Bay, Wis., 
in late July. Just over 14,700 
showed up. Nearly all wore green 
and gold, and a good percentage sported 
yellow foam cheese hats. 

Other professional sports franchises 
may claim the best fans, but only the 
Packers are owned by the fans. When the 
team sold 269,000 shares to finance 
improvements to Lambeau Field, a friend of 
mine tackled a $250 stock certificate for 
his Virginia office wall. The only extra point 
to owning the stock - it pays no dividends 
- is receiving tickets to the annual meet- 
ing. I scored my friend’s unused tickets. 

Lambeau Field is very modern for a 
storied stadium where Bart Starr and 
Brett Favre played. From the new end zone 


bleachers, the unnaturally green field looked 
smaller than it does on TV. 

The business meeting was a series of 
reports on the last and next seasons, a lot 
of cheerleading, and inspirational videos 
on the Jumbotrons purchased with the fran- 
chise’s fifth stock offering since 1923. When 
the accountant climbed the stage, a flood 
of green Jerseys cut for the exits, the gift 
shop, and the best bratwursts and beer in 
Wisconsin. 

You don’t have to wait for a sharehold- 
ers’ meeting to visit Lambeau Field. Call 
920/569-7513 or go to www.packers.com/ 
lambeau-field/stadium-tours.html for a 
tour schedule. 


1,201st in a series. Coiiect them aii. Day Trips, Vol. 2, a book of ""Day Trips , " 
is avaiiabie for $8.95, pi us $3.05 for shipping, handiing, and tax. 

Maii to: Day Trips, PO Box 33284, South Austin, TX 78704. 






LISTINGS 


veyors of things creamy and cold will be on hand to 
lower the temperature of your doubtlessly overheating 
body. Food and beverages for the lactose intolerant 
as well. Join in the ice-cream-eating contest or the 
popsicle-stick sculpture contest or enjoy the usual 
live music, games, rides, and carnival-style attrac- 
tions. Sat., Aug. 9, 10am-7pm. Fiesta Gardens, 

2100 Jesse E. Segovia St., 512/480-8318. $10 
(kids 8 and younger, free), www.austinicecreamfestival.com. 
ROCK FEST The only head-banging going on here 
would be if you fell into the 5,000-pound amethyst 
geode you can win a chanceto have a photo op with. 
Otherwise, it’s all things rocks and minerals, with 
games and activities, and the unveiling of the new 
fluorescent rock exhibit. Sat., Aug. 9, 10am-6pm. 
Nature’s Treasures, 4103 N. 1-35, 512/472-5015. 
www.naturestreasurestx.com . 

SECOND SATURDAY WORKSHOP The group dis 
cusses “Recovery Sculpt,” presented by Sabrina 
Beck. Sat., Aug. 9, Warn. Austin Recovery, 

8402 Cross Park Dr., 512/697-8500. Free. 

www.austinrecovery.org/recoveryresources/secondsatur- 

dayworkshops.aspx. 

FUN WITH LEDS What to do with over 2,000 LED 
lights? Make stuff! Workshops covering the how-tos 
take place all day, including tutorials on glow bal- 
loons, lanterns, and throwies. Insert epilepsy warning 
here. Sat., Aug. 9, 12-6pm. ATX Fiackerspace, 

9701 Dessau #304. Free, www.atxhs.org. 

FREE SEMINAR ON HARAJUKU FASHION Karen 
Bravo hosts this seminar explaining the popular styles 
of dress in Japan’s trendy Harajuku district. Sat., Aug. 9, 
2pm. Austin Schooi of Fashion Design, 3216 S. Congress, 
512/323-0633. Free, www.austinschooioffashiondesign.com. 

PIRATE’S BALL Put on your best eye patch, sharpen 
your cutlass, and prepare to walk the plank at this 
party benefiting Austin Pets Alive! Sat., Aug. 9, 2pm. 
Wyndham Garden Hotei, 3401 S. 1-35, 512/448-2444. 
$55. www.ctxphc.com. 

DENIM & DIAMONDS PARTY: A BOOT-SCOOTIN’ 
BALL It’s Last Act Theatre’s third birthday, so put on 
your cowboy boots and get ready for a “classy coun- 
try” celebration. Cocktails, music, raffle prizes, and 
more! Sat., Aug. 9, 7pm. Private residence, 

4404 JinxAve. $15. www.iastacttheater.com. 

ULTIMATE ‘DOCTOR WHO’ TRIVIA Grab your coat 
and scarf, rustle up some companions, and vie for 
bragging rights at this - hopefully Dalek-free - quiz. 
Sun., Aug. 10, 1pm. Barnes & Nobie Arboretum, 

10000 Research #158, 512/418-8985. 


WRITING & ART WORKSHOP FOR CAREGIVERS & 
CARE-RECIPIENTS This six-week creative program 
for caregivers and their loved ones is funded by 
Health’s Angels, a program of St. David’s Foundation 
Community Fund. Caregivers attend a writing work- 
shop while care-recipients attend an art workshop. 
Tuesdays, l:30-3pm, through Sept. 9. Meais on Wheeis 
and More, 3227 E. Fifth, 512/476-6325. Free. 
www.austiniibrary.org. 

PUNK NITE Break out the safety pins and that old 
Siouxsie Sioux T-shirt and skate to live bands playing 
all your punk faves. Thu., Aug. 14, 9pm. Austin Roiier 
Rink, 11600 Manchaca Rd., 512/292-7528. $5. 

www.austinroiierrink.com. 


I I I I H 

THE MAIN EVENT 

TEXAS ROLLER DERBY The ladies of the banked 
track rip the Palmer Events Center a new one as 
the Cherry Bombs face the Rhinestone Cowgirls. 

Sat., Aug. 9, 7pm. Paimer Events Center, 

900 Barton Springs Rd. $15. www.txrd.com. 

BAT CITY PINBALL TOURNAMENT Meet other pin 
bailers and play in a tournament and try to beat the 
machine! The format of the tournament is a single- 
elimination bracket with head-to-head matches on 
one machine, with the best score of three two-player 
games advancing to the next round. Registration 
required. Mon., Aug. 11, 7:30pm. Buffaio Biiiiards, 

201 E. Sixth, 512/479-7665. Free, except quarters 
for the pinbaii machines, register.batcitypinbaii.org. 

THE HOME TEAMS 

ROUND ROCK EXPRESS After spending the week- 
end in Nashville, the Express return with a four-game 
series against the Aces. Vs. Reno, Mon.-Fri., Aug. 
12-15, 7:05pm. Deii Diamond, 3400 E. Paim Vaiiey 
Bivd., Round Rock, 512/255-2255. $7-16. 
www.roundrockexpress.com. 

RUNS, WALKS, & RIDES 

NATIONAL OVARIAN CANCER COALITION RUN/ 
WALK Get there early to stroll or Jog or sprint or skip 
for a good cause. Sun., Aug. 10, 7am. The Domain, 
11410 Century Oaks Terrace, 512/402-5017. $30. 
www.nocc.kintera.org/austintx. 


Soccer Watch BY NICK BARBARO 


Another smart move from the Austin Aztex this week. They announced Monday that 
they’re bringing popular and successful head coach Paul Dalglish back from MLS to head 
the Aztex as they move up to USL PRO next season. He’ll be both head coach and techni- 
cal director, under what Aztex owner Rene Van de Zande called “a long-term contract.” 

Dalglish had enormous success when he coached the Aztex in their first two seasons, 
culminating in 2013 with the USL Premier Development League championship, and 
PDL Coach of the Year honors. He also had an unheard-of eight players from those two 
rosters drafted in the last two MLS SuperDrafts. Following that 2013 season, he moved up 
to MLS as an assistant coach at Real Salt Lake. Now, with today’s announcement, he’ll 
leave RSL immediately, and will be back in Austin before the end of the month. 

Dalglish, 37, played as a pro in Scotland, England, and the U.S., and won back-to-back 
MLS Cups with the Houston Dynamo in 2006-07. In a prepared statement, he said, “My 
family and I are extremely excited to be coming back to Austin. The challenge of leading 
the Aztex in their inaugural year in the professional ranks was one I couldn’t refuse. I will 
work tirelessly to help build a team that our supporters including Eberly’s Army and the 
city of Austin will be proud of, a team that will be willing to fight for their lives to defend 
the Aztex jersey whilst also playing the beautiful game in an attractive, exciting manner. I 
will be sad to leave the fantastic players and staff that have become friends behind in Salt 
Lake City. They have made me a better coach and a better person. Finally, I’d like to thank 
the ownership group at the Austin Aztex for putting their trust in me to lead the team and 
for providing me with the tools necessary to be successful.” RSL, for their part, said they 
wish Dalglish all the best, and that they’re “happy for Paul and his family to get this oppor- 
tunity that he Just couldn’t say no to.” 

Manuel Buentello, the Aztex’s head coach in 2014, will resume his position as an 
assistant coach and scout, a role he played under Dalglish from 2012-14. 

The favored USA women got off to a rough start to the U-20 Women’s World Cup on 
Tuesday, falling to Germany, 2-0 in Edmonton. They conclude group play against Brazil 
(9pm Friday, Aug. 8, ESPNU) and China (3pm Tuesday, Aug. 12, ESPN2), with the quarterfi- 
nals being played next weekend. Canada is hosting the tourney as something of a dry run 
for the senior Women’s World Cup, which takes place next June and July. 


mn. 


‘SEUSSICAL JR.’ ZACH’s Pre-Professional Students 
present this Broadway musical adaptation of some of 
Dr. Seuss’ most cherished stories. Fri.-Sat, Aug. 8 & 

9, 2pm & 7pm. Zach Theatre, 1510 Toomey, 
512/476-0594. $10. www.zachtheatre.org. 

‘THE WIZARD OF OZ’ The students at the Austin 
Summer Musical for Children are off to see the Wiz- 
ard. Bring the family and join them! Sat-Sun., through 
Aug. 24; Sat, 11am, 2pm, 4pm; Sun., 2pm & 4pm. 
Boyd Vance Theatre at Carver Museum, 1165 Angeiina, 
512/605-9018. Free, www.summermusical.com. 

‘THE BIRTHDAY PARTY’ A fully improvised show, all 
centered around a birthday party. Saturdays, 10am, 
through Aug. 16. CoidTowne Theater, 4803-B Airport, 
512/809-0017. $5. www.moveyourtale.com. 

FAMILY SATURDAY Create characters out of clay, 
and then animate them at the pop-up animation sta- 
tion! Hosted by Johnny Villarreal. Sat, Aug. 9, 11am- 
3pm. Laguna Gioria, 3809 W. 35th, 512/458-8191. 
$ 10 . thecontemporaryaustin.org. 

RACHEL COLEMAN DEEP IN THE HEART OF TEXAS 

Coleman, co-creator of the award-winning PBS series 
Signing Time!, will perform songs and educate attend- 
ees on the learning benefits of sign language. Sat, Aug. 
9, 2pm. LifeAustin, 8901 Hwy. 71 W. www.iifeaustin.com. 

‘THE PIRATES OF HIDEOUT COVE’ To while away 
the long hours of their ocean voyages, these 
pirates play games and tell tales, often with the 
help of kids and their parents. Don’t forget your 
pirate costume! Sundays, through Aug. 31, 2pm. The 
Hideout Theatre, 617 Congress, 512/449-9688. $5. 
www.hideouttheatre.com/improv-for-kids/fiyingtheatermachine. 

ROBOTICS KIDS CAMP This one-day session teach- 
es kids age 8-14 how to build robots and solve robot- 
related problems. Thu., Aug. 14, 9am-5:30pm. Zavaia 
Eiementary, 310 Robert T. Martinez Jr., 512/414-2318. 
$40-50. www.iasarobotics.org/smart/signup. 




KIDCATION WEEK Sure it’s a big promotional cam- 
paign to get parents to bring their children to the 
Alamo City, but there are lots of bargains to be found 
around the city for one last week of summer fun. Fri.- 
Sun., Aug. 8-17. San Antonio, 800/447-3372. 
www.visitsanantonio.com . 

BLUES, BREWS, AND BASE There will be music, an 
art fair, and samples of Texas lagers (tickets for the 
beer must be purchased online). Sat-Sun., Aug. 9-10. 
Saiado, 254/947-8634. www.saiadoevents.com. 

GRAPE STOMP Celebrate the grape harvest with a 
grape stomp, live music, and award-winning wines. 
Sat-Sun., Aug. 9-10, 16-17. Pedernaies Ceiiars, 
Stonewaii, 830/644-2037. www.pedernaiesceiiars.com. 
LAVENDER AND WINE FEST Tour the farm and sam- 
ple their lavender products, and then head over to 
Windy Winery to sample the wines and stomp some 
grapes. Sat, Aug. 9, 9am-3pm. Chappeii Hiii Lavender 
Farm, Washington, 979/251-8114. Free. 
www.chappeiihiiiiavender.com. 

LIVE HORSE RACING The ponies will be running for 
a chance for the big money in the Fair Futurity during 
the county fair. Sat. & Sun., Aug. 9-10, 23-24. Giiiespie 
County Fair Grounds, Fredericksburg, 830/997-2359. 

www.giiiespiefair.com. 

SUPERMOON When the moon is full on the same 
day it is closest to the Earth, it looks unusually large. 
There are five supermoons in 2014, with two more 
left on Sun., Aug. 10, and Tue., Sept 9. Everywhere. 
Free, www.earthsky.org/space/what-is-a-supermoon . 




SICILY: TAORMINA, 
AGRIGENTO, 
PALERMO JUN. 7-16 


VENICE, FLORENCE, 
ROME, AMALFI COAST 
JUN. 15-26 

NEW YEAR’S IN 

SICILY! DEC.26-JAN.4 

512 - 345-8941 

ELSA@ATASTEOFITALYINAUSTIN.COM 


www.ATasteOfItalyInAustin.com 


WHERE CAN 
METRORA/L 
TAKE ME THIS 
WEEKEND? 



TEXAS ROLLER DERBY The ladies 

of the banked track rip the Palmer Events Center a 
new one as the Cherry Bombs face the Rhinestone 
Cowgirls. Sat., Aug. 9, 7pm. Palmer Events Center, 

900 Barton Springs Rd. $15. www.txrd.com. 

THE SOUNDTRACK SERIES 

Direct from New York City, but amplified with local 
luminaries, this popular show is where performers and 
writers take the mic to share the stories and memories 
they forever associate with a song from their past. 
Hosted by Dana Rossi and featuring Johnny Goudie, 
Mia Martina,Ellen Stoder, Andy Campbell, Dale Dud- 
ley, and Laurie Gallardo. Sat, Aug. 9, 8pm. The North 
Door, 502 Brushy, 5121485-3002. $W. 
www.thenorthdoor.com 

OLD BAKERY ART GALLERY: 
AUSTIN ARTISTS @ WORK 

New work from this creative group, with pieces by Pat 
Molina, Cot Quintanilla, Raquel Cordon, David French, 
Jonathon Grider, Larry Jolly, John Mark Luke, Lauren 
Pomatto, Jo Lene Ropiak, and others. Reception: Fri., 
Aug. 8, 5-7pm. 1006 Congress, 5121477-5961. 

ICE CREAM FESTIVAL Kinda like the 

Hot Sauce Festival but less masochistic. All your favor- 
ite purveyors of things creamy and cold will be on hand 
to lower the temperature of your doubtlessly overheat- 
ing body. Food and beverages for the lactose intolerant 
as well. Join in the ice-cream-eating contest or the 
popsicle-stick sculpture contest or enjoy the usual live 
music, games, rides, and carnival-style attractions. 

Sat, Aug. 9, 10am. Fiesta Gardens, 2100 Jesse E. 
Segovia St., 512/480-8318. $10 (kids 8 and younger, 
free), www.austinicecreamfestival.com. 



GO^WNTOWN. 

Friday & Saturday 
'til midnight 


Plan your trip at capmetro.org/metrorail 


austinchronicle.com AUGUST8,2014 the Austin chronicle 59 






AUGUST 8-14 



The Hundred-Foot Journey 

D: Lasse Hallstrom; with Helen Mirren, Om Pur, Manish Dayal, Charlotte Le Bon, Amit Shah, 

Farzana Dua Elahe, Dillon Mitra. (PG, 122 min.) 

A picturesque, well-acted comedy about the culinary 
education of a young Indian cook who emigrates to 


the south of France, The Hundred-Foot Journey 
is elevated comfort food. The flavors aren’t 
complex, but it’s nourishing nonetheless. 

The title refers to the distance that sepa- 
rates two restaurants in a sleepy village 
called Lumiere. On one side of the road, 
the imperious Madame Mallory (Mirren) 
prepares classical French 
dishes that have earned her 
restaurant a coveted Michelin 
star. On the other side of the 
road is the scrappy upstart 
Maison Mumbai, run by the 
Kadam family, who left India under tragic 
circumstances (improbably related in an 
early info-dump to a customs officer). Papa 
Kadam (Puri) is an imp with a spiritual bent 
and Maison Mumbai’s indefatigable impresa- 
rio, while his twentysomething son Hassan 
(Dayal), working from his late mother’s reci- 


pes, makes enough magic happen in the 
kitchen to jangle Madame Mallory’s nerves. 
The two restaurants go to war. But the sides 
are not so easily drawn: Seduced by the 
haute cuisine wonders of bechamel and 
veloute, Hassan - Papa’s first lieutenant - is 
considering desertion. 

Steven Knight’s sweet, slack 
script (adapted from the novel by 
Richard C. Morais) is a startling 
volte-face from his taut-muscled 
Locke, a spring sleeper: The lat- 
ter felt like real life on its very 
worst day, while The Hundred-Foot Journey 
feasts on its own movieness, with wise- 
cracking one-liners, sunny aphorisms, and 
culinary mysticisms care-wrapped in Lasse 
Hallstrom’s sun-flare framing of pretty people 
and pretty landscapes. The food looks pretty 
damn tasty, too. 


RECOMMENDED 


★★★ 


Alamo Lakeline, Arbor, Barton Creek Square, CM Cedar Park, Hill Country Galleria, CM Round Rock, 
Southpark Meadows, Flix Brewhouse, Highland, iPic, Tinseltown North, Tinseltown South, Westgate 


BY KIMBERLEY JONES 



DEEPSEA CHALLENGE 3D 

D: John Bruno, Ray Quint, Andrew Wight. (PG, 90 min.) 

Not reviewed at press time. This time 
out for James Cameron it’s “bottom of the 
world” time for the Titanic director. Rather 
than being behind the camera for this shoot, 
Cameron is inside his Deepsea Challenger 
submarine exploring the deepest part of the 
ocean. - Marjorie Baumgarten 

Metropolitan, Tinseltown South 

ENTERTAINMENT 

D: Farhad, Sajid; with Akshay Kumar, Tamannaah Bhatia, 
Johnny Lever. (NR, 140 min., subtitled) 

Not reviewed at press time. Bollywood 
action/comedy king Akshay Kumar stars in 
this new comedy. - Marjorie Baumgarten 

Tinseltown South 

GALIPATAM 

D: Naveen Gandhi; with Aadi, Erica Fernandes, Kristina 
Akheeva. (NR, 180 min., subtitled) 

Not reviewed at press time. Telugu 
romance. - Marjorie Baumgarten 

Tinseltown South 

INTO THE STORM 

D: Steven Quale; with Richard Amitage, Sarah Wayne Callies, 
Matt Walsh, Max Deacon, Nathan Kress. (PG-13, 89 min.) 

Disaster movies over the last decade or so 
have evolved from catastrophe-specific invo- 
cations of usually very localized doom and 
destruction to more grandiose apocalyptic 
visions in which the devastation of nature is 
not limited to time and place, but is instead 
world-ending in breadth and scope. Into the 
Storm is a throwback (hoping that’s not a 
pun), a film centered on tornadoes ravag- 
ing a limited area affecting a few states. 
Admittedly, the storm in the film ends up 
being the baddest mother of all tornados, 

60 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE AUGUST 8, 2014 


but this is more evocation and thrill ride than 
ecological manifesto. 

The film brings the audience along through 
the whole process. There is the nonchalant, 
early gaiety as the storm is viewed as nothing 
more than an ordinary rain. During this build- 
up, the film tracks the lives of various charac- 
ters and their activities in the morning before 
the storm hits - including a troop of tornado 
storm-trackers who are determined to plunge 
into the heart of the maelstrom. 

In the calm before the storm, the normal- 
ity of the characters is almost boring, the 
Joys and traumas of daily life being inher- 
ently mundane. The storm-tracking team 
hasn’t managed to find a tornado in a 
year. The high school’s assistant principal 
(Richard Armitage) is having no luck com- 
municating with his sons as he readies for 
graduation ceremonies. 

The film lingers on this beginning, which 
builds audience anticipation. We know this 
calm and normal surface is soon to be shat- 
tered. And it is. Into the Storm takes us 
through the experience of a natural disaster: 
ignorance followed by growing awareness, 
followed by shock, followed by shock and 
awe, and ending in the joy of survival and 
the despair over the death and destruction 
left behind. 

Into the Storm captures the magnificence 
of tornadoes, their awful beauty when they 
set down, the devastation they wreak, and 
the enormity of their consequences. The film 
features a rich array of well-developed char- 
acters - including the storm itself - which 
makes it ever more involving as it unfolds. 

The film’s ambitions are no greater than 
capturing and evoking a terribly devastating 
storm. It achieves this and even pulls off 
such sleights of hand as sacrificing a few 
characters, but having the majority of them 


not only emerge on the other side but be the 
better for the whole experience. By the end, 
this allows more of a sense of triumph and 
hope than doom and despair. 

★★★ - Louis Black 

Alamo Lakeline, Alamo Slaughter Lane, Barton 
Creek Square, CM Cedar Park, Hill Country 
Galleria, CM Round Rock, Southpark Meadows, 

CM Stone Hill Town Center, Flix Brewhouse, 
Highland, Gateway, iPic, Lakeline, Metropolitan, 
Moviehouse, Tinseltown North, Westgate 

LErS BE COPS 

D: Luke Greenfield; with Damon Wayons Jr., Jake Johnson, 
Rob Riggle, Nina Dobrev, Andy Garcia. (R, 104 min.) 

Not reviewed at press time. When two 
friends dress as cops for a costume party, 
they get mistaken for the real thing and 
lots of complications ensue. One would 
think the police have enough trouble to 
thwart without the assistance of a couple of 
jokers-cum-neighborhood heroes. 

- Marjorie Baumgarten 
Alamo Lakeline, Alamo Slaughter Lane, Barton 
Creek Square, CM Cedar Park, Hill Country 
Galleria, CM Round Rock, Southpark Meadows, 

CM Stone Hill Town Center, Highland, Gateway, 
Tinseltown North, Westgate 

MAGIC IN THE MOONLIGHT 

D: Woody Allen; with Colin Firth, Emma Stone, Marcia Gay 
Harden, Simon McBurney, Eileen Atkins, Hamish Linklater. 
(PG-13, 97 min.) 

When we first meet Stanley (Firth), he is 
wowing a Berlin audience as his alter ego, 
Wei Ling Soo, a Chinese illusionist whose 
grand finale is making an elephant van- 
ish. The year is 1928, and Stanley’s old 
magician pal Howard (McBurney) meets 
up with Stanley backstage, seeking his 
help. A rich American family has seemingly 
been put under the spell of a gold-digging 
mystic named Sophie (Stone), and their for- 


tune is in jeopardy because the heir, Brice 
(Linklater), is so besotted with her that all 
concerned fear he may propose marriage. 
Howard is flummoxed as to how Sophie pulls 
off her seances, and pleads with Stanley to 
accompany him to the Cote d’Azur to debunk 
Sophie’s otherworldly skills. Stanley is more 
than happy to oblige, since he considers him- 
self to be the very embodiment of rationality. 
He’s also a supercilious misanthrope who is 
prone to long-winded monologues - in other 
words, the usual Allen proxy. When Sophie’s 
supernatural powers in unveiling secrets has 
even Stanley believing her, the illusionist 
sees the walls crumbling around his castle 
of pragmatism, and questions whether there 
might be magic (and romance) in the world 
after all. 

Those expecting a charming bonbon a 
la Midnight in Paris may wish to lower their 
expectations. Magic in the MoonlighVs story 
is exceedingly threadbare, a first draft that 
never got fleshed out or tightened up. Firth’s 
performance works - this is Mr. Darcy we’re 
talking about here - but Stone is often left 
with nothing to do except shimmer under the 
beautiful cinematography of Darius Khondji. 
The theme of the rational vs. the spiritual is 
one Allen has grappled with for most of his 
career, with much better results. It’s pretty 
evident that as long as he keeps attracting 
European financing, Allen will continue to 
mull them over in whatever agreeable locale 
suits his fancy. So, left with the travelogue 
eye-candy of the south of France and plot 
twists that question the meaning of that 
phrase’s definition, one has plenty of time to 
ponder the casting of Firth, 53, as a roman- 
tic partner to Stone, 25. Ah, that’s where 
that elephant went. 

★★ - Josh Kupecki 

Arbor, Violet Crown 


austinchronicle.com 






FILM LISTINGS 


RUN RAJA RUN 

D: Sujeeth; with Sharwanand, Seerat Kapoor, Adivi Sesh, 
Sampath Raj. (NR, 137 min., subtitled) 

Not reviewed at press time. This bilingual 
comedy was filmed using a mixture of Tamil 
and Telugu. - Marjorie Baumgarten 

Tinseltown South 

STEP UP: ALL IN 

D: Irish Sie; with Ryan Guzman, Briana Evigan, Adam 
Sevan!, Misha Gabriel, Stephen “twitch” Boss) Stephen 
“Stev-0” Jones, David “Kid David” Shreibman, Mari Koda. 
(PG-13, 112 min.) 

Not reviewed at press time. Previous Step 
Up stars take their competition to Las Vegas. 

- Marjorie Baumgarten 
Barton Creek Square, CM Cedar Park, Hill Country 
Galleria, CM Round Rock, Southpark Meadows, 

CM Stone Hill Town Center, Highland, Gateway, 
iPic, Lakeline, Tinseltown North, Tinseltown 
South, Westgate 

TEENAGE MUTANT 
NINJA TURTLES 

D: Jonathan Liebesman; with Megan Fox, Alan Ritchson, Will 
Arnett, Noel Fisher, William Fichtner, Jeremy Howard, Pete 
Ploszek, Tohoru Masamune. (PG-13, 101 min.) 

Not reviewed at press time. The crime- 
fighting terrapins rise from the sewers once 
more. - Marjorie Baumgarten 

Alamo Lakeline, Alamo Slaughter Lane, Alamo 
Village, Barton Creek Square, CM Cedar Park, 

Hill Country Galleria, CM Round Rock, Southpark 
Meadows, CM Stone Hill Town Center, Flix 
Brewhouse, Highland, Gateway, iPic, Lakeline, 
Moviehouse, Tinseltown North, Tinseltown South, 
Westgate 


openings 

Deepsea Challenge 3D (PG) 
E/?ferfa/t7/?7e/?f (NR) 

Ga//pafa/??(NR) 

The Hundred-Foot Journey (PG) 

Into the Storm (PG-13) 

Lets Be Cops (R) 

Magic in the Moonlight (PG-13) 

Run Raja Run (NR) 

Step Up: All In (PG-13) 

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (PG-13) 

ratings 

★★★★★ As perfect as a movie can be 

★★★★ Slightly flawed, 

but excellent nonetheless 

★★★ Has its good points, 
and its bad points 

★★ Mediocre, but with one or two 
bright spots 

★ Poor, without any saving graces 

* La bomba 




Jim 


*Full-length reviews available online at 
austinchronicle.com. Dates at end of reviews 
indicate original publication date. 


AND SO IT GOES 

D: Rob Reiner; with Michael Douglas, Diane Keaton, Frances 
Sternhagen, Sterling Jerins, Austin Lysy, Rob Reiner, Annie Parisse, 
Yaya DaCosta, Maurice Jones. (PG-13, 94 min.) 

What’s up with Diane Keaton? An acquired taste, 
the 68-year-old actress toils mostly with thankless, 
seemingly interchangeable stock roles in glossy family 
dramas and romantic comedies - somehow manag- 
ing to make these unremarkable characters vibrant, 
even though the quality of her films lately leaves 
much to be desired. Her recent track record doesn’t 
improve with the gooey And So It Goes, which finds 
Keaton playing Leah, a widowed, wannabe lounge 
singer. Grumpy old man Michael Douglas’ Oren is the 
rude widower who lives next door, his uncomplicated 
life turned upside down when he must care for his 
estranged son’s daughter. There is a notable absence 
of directorial stewardship here. Certain scenes play 
as if Rob Reiner forgot to show up for filming, so the 
actors and cameraman Just winged it. Perhaps his 
embarrassing turn as Leah’s clueless accompanist 
distracted him from his principal responsibilities 
behind the camera. What a Meathead. (07/25/2014) 
iri - Steve Davis 

Hill Country Galleria, CM Round Rock, Gateway, Westgate 


BEGIN AGAIN 

D: John Carney; with Keira Knightley, Mark Buffalo, Hailee Steinfeld, 
Adam Levine, James Corden, CeeLo Green, Catherine Keener. (R, 104 min.) 

For writer/director John Carney, at least one 
story is tried and true: A pair of unlikely partners 
are drawn together by the promise of making music. 

If his perfectly romantic Once was raw sugar, then 
Begin Again - which sees scorned songwriter Gretta 
(Knightley) and washed-up record company exec Dan 
(Buffalo) reluctantly collaborating - is Splenda in com- 
parison. Increasing the star power and moving from 
the streets of Dublin to New York City, the film also 
sees a proportional increase in agreeable phoniness. 
Gretta ’s Just left Dave (Levine, of Maroon 5). Dan has 
Just lost his job at a Grammy-winning hip-hop label. In 
a last-ditch attempt to Jump-start her musical career 
and rescue his, the pair decide to record an entire 
album live on the streets. It’s no Once, but there are 
enough lovely little moments and catchy ditties to 
effectively combat the convention which threatens to 
swallow the story whole. (07/04/2014) 

★★★ - William Goss 

Arbor 


O BOYHOOD 

D: Richard Linklater; with Filar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette, Ethan 
Hawke, Lorelei Linklater. (R, 164 min.) 

With his newest release Boyhood, Richard Linklater 
has created the ultimate coming-of-age film, a true 
masterwork that transcends the usual constructs 
of the genre and delves into the development of 
personhood as it is experienced - day by day, year 
in and year out. By the very nature of its approach 

- Boyhood was filmed a few days at a time over 12 
years - the film allows us to witness time’s effects 
on the boy of the title, Mason Jr. (Coltrane), as well 
as his family: mother Olivia (Arquette), father Mason 
Sr. (Hawke), and older sister Samantha (Lorelei 
Linklater). From the get-go, we’re placed on a course 
to observe a child’s ongoing experience with making 
sense of the world he’s inherited. Boyhood’s original- 
ity clearly extends beyond the screen, and it’s this 
film - even more so than Slacker or the Before trilogy 

- that will earn Linklater a place in the history books. 
(07/18/2014) 

- Marjorie Baumgarten 

Alamo Lakeline, Alamo Slaughter Lane, Arbor, Barton 
Creek Square, Hill Country Galleria, Tinseltown South, 
Violet Crown 


O CODE BLACK 

D: Ryan McGarry. (NR, 82 min.) 

Emergency medicine - the first line of last resort 
for our country’s poor and uninsured - may be a vic- 
tim of its own success, with hospital ERs and their 
waiting rooms overwhelmed by patients who believe 
they have nowhere else to go. There’s a failure in the 
system - in other words, a Code Black. Filmmaker/ 
physician Ryan McGarry shot Code Black over several 
years, while completing his residency at Los Angeles 


County General, a wildly overloaded public hospital. 
The finished documentary (which has won several 
festival awards) is remarkably vivid in capturing the 
sights and sounds of the ER, as well as the triumphs 
and inadequacies of America’s health care system. 
Despite its tendency to Jackrabbit around in its 
themes and personalities. Code Black is a riveting 
document which allows us up-close access to the ER, 
sans personal emergency - through a protective layer 
of film, if you will. (08/01/2014) 

★★★ - Marjorie Baumgarten 

Arbor 

O DAWN OF THE PLANET OF 
THE APES 

D: Matt Reeves; with Andy Serkis, Jason Clarke, Gary Oldman, 

Keri Russell, Toby Kebbell, Nick Thurston, Kodi Smit-McPhee, Kirk 
Acevedo, Terry Notary, Karin Konoval, Judy Greer. (PG-13, 130 min.) 

Ten years after the ape-ocalypse witnessed in 
2011’s Rise of the Planet of the Apes, we revisit 
these apes as they lay the groundwork for their new 
society among the California redwoods. Now fully 
bipedal, the apes live in Anasazi-like dwellings, where 
English-language skills and philosophical teachings 
(“Ape not kill ape”) are scratched onto the rock walls, 
under the leadership of Caesar (a combined marvel 
of computer imaging and motion-capture acting by 
Andy Serkis). With mankind decimated by a simian flu 
epidemic, a few inexplicably immune survivors - led 
by Malcolm (Clarke) and his wife Elbe (Russell) - are 
deep in the apes’ territory when a gun goes off, 
an ape dies, and rapprochement between the two 
species falls to Caesar and Malcolm. Director Matt 
Reeves [Cloverfield , Let Me In) - an expert at eking 
pathos from CGI - is perfect for this engaging story 
about the beasts that lie within. (07/11/2014) 

- Marjorie Baumgarten 

Alamo Lakeline, Alamo Slaughter Lane, Barton Creek 
Square, CM Cedar Park, CM Round Rock, Southpark 
Meadows, Gateway, Lakeline, Tinseltown North, 
Tinseltown South, Westgate 

O EARTH TO ECHO 

D: Dave Green; with Brian ‘Astro’ Bradley, Teo Halm, Reese Hartwig, 
Ella Wahlestedt, Jason Gray-Stanford. (PG, 91 min.) 

Stop me if you’ve heard this one before: A trio of 
suburban kids befriend an alien entity and must avoid 
parents and authorities alike in their mission to send 
it back home. Earth to Echo makes no secret of its 
foremost influence: E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial. Despite 
its oft-distracting, handheld shaky-cam aesthetic, Dave 
Green’s first feature still makes for a brisk, appealing 
adventure, capably anchored by four young actors. 

On their last day together in their suburban Nevada 
hometown, our intrepid videographer Tuck (Bradley) 
and best friends Alex (Halm) and Munch (Hartwig) 
follow a mysterious beacon into the nearby desert 
to discover its sender, a wide-eyed robotic alien they 
decide to name Echo. Of course, they’re not the 
only ones looking for him. Updating an old-fashioned 
Journey with newfangled, digital distractions. Earth to 
Echo is a small-scale and squeaky-clean alternative 
to blockbuster bombast, about as unoriginal as it is 
fundamentally inoffensive. (07/04/2014) 

- William Goss 

Lake Creek 7, Tinseltown South 

EDGE OF TOMORROW 

D: Doug Liman; with Tom Cruise, Emily Blunt, Bill Paxton, Brendan 
Gleeson, Jonas Armstrong, Tony Way, Kick Gurry, Franz Drameh, 
Dragomir Mrsic, Charlotte Riley. (PG-13, 113 min.) 

The unabashed Tom Cruise vehicle Edge of 
Tomorrow is a sci-fi riff on the Eastern philosophy of 
enlightenment: If at first you don’t succeed, die, die 
again. An Earth-vs.-aliens Groundhog Day in which 
the loveable rodent resembles, rather, a flaming land- 
squid intent on world domination, the first half of 
the film is entertaining - a perversely adroit comedy 
about the inexperienced American officer William 
Cage, who’s given the unique opportunity to hone 
his combat skills as a result of his ability to con- 
stantly reboot the day upon which he dies in battle 
with extraterrestrials on the beaches of France. The 
film’s second half, however, disappoints. The final 
sequence, in which Cruise and company (including a 
miscast Blunt) finally destroy the invaders, requires 
the audience to shift to autopilot because the film’s 
attempts to explain the whys and hows simply don’t 
stick. What the hell? Just turn off the brain; you’ll be 
fine. (06/06/2014) 

iriri - Steve Davis 

Movies 8, Lake Creek 7 



GALAXY THEATRES' 

^ SEE AND FEEL THE MOVIE! ^ * 

* EXPERIENCE AUSTIN’S ONLY if 

Id-box motion seating theatre! 

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NOTICE: No ONE UNDER 1 8 YEARS OF AGE WILL BE ALLOWED 
IN THE THEATRE ON FRI. 8c SAT. AFTER 7PM WITHOUT AN ADULT. 

Step Up: All In (PG-13) Fri. & Sat. 4:35 7:05 9:35 1 1 :59 

Sun. - Tue. 4:35 7:05 9:35 

Step Up: All In 3D (PG-1 3) Fri. - Tue. 1 1 :20 1 :50 

The Hundred-Foot Journey (PG) Fri. & Sat. 1 0:20 1 :00 4:00 6:45 9:30 1 1 :59 

Sun. - Tue. 10:20 1:00 4:00 6:45 9:30 

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (PG-13) DBox Motion Seating Fri. - Tue. 11:00 
1:40 4:20 

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turties 3D (PG-13) DBox Motion Seating Fri & Sat 7:00 

9:3011:59 

Sun. - Tue. 7:00 9:30 

Hercules (PG-13) Fri. - Sun. & Tue. 10:25 12:35 2:55 5:10 7:30 9:50 
Mon. 10:25 

Guardians of the Galaxy (PG-1 3) Fri. & Sat. 1 0:00 1 0:30 1 2:55 1 :30 3:50 4:30 6:45 
7:30 9:45 10:30 11:59 

Sun. & Mon. 10:00 10:30 12:55 1:30 3:50 4:30 6:45 7:30 9:45 10:30 

Tue. 1 0:00 1 0:30 1 2:55 1 :30 3:50 4:30 6:45 7:30 1 0:30 

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turties (PG-13) Fri. - Tue. 1 1 :00 1 1 :35 1 :40 2:10 4:20 

4:45 7:3010:00 

Hercules (PG-13) Mon. 12:35 2:55 5:10 7:30 9:50 

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turties 3D (PG-13) Fri. & Sat. 7:00 9:30 1 1 :59 

Sun. - Tue. 7:00 9:30 

Into the Storm (PG-13) Fri. & Sat. 10:20 12:30 2:40 4:55 7:10 9:25 1 1:30 

Sun. - Tue. 10:20 12:30 2:40 4:55 7:10 9:25 

Lucy (R) Fri. & Sat. 1 1 :00 1 : 1 0 3: 1 0 5:20 7:35 9:50 1 1 :59 

Sun. - Tue. 11:00 1:10 3:10 5:20 7:35 9:50 

Get on Up (PG-13) Fri. - Tue. 10:00 12:55 3:55 7:05 10:00 

Let's Be Cops (R) Tue. 10:00 

Wed. & Thu. 1 1 :00 1 :45 4:30 7:1 5 10:00 



austinchronicle.com AUGUST 8, 2014 the Austin chronicle 61 










FRIDAY, AUG. 8 - THURSDAY, AUG. 14 

An asterisk (*) before a title means that no passes or special admission discounts will be accepted. 

FOR UPDATED SHOWTIMES, SEE austinchronicle.com/film. 

Changes may sometimes occur; viewers are encouraged to call theatres to confirm showtimes. 


ALAMO DRAFTHOUSE AT THE RITZ 320 E. Sixth, 
512/476-1320. Showtimes at this venue are subject to 
frequent change. Piease confirm daiiy by phone or website. 
AGFA Cinemapocalypse: Sat, 2:00pm 
Blue Water, White Death: Sun, 10:15pm 
Terror Tuesday: The Boogeyman:Tue, 10:30pm 
Lynch: David Lynch Mystery Program: Mon, 10:35pm 
*Guardians of the Galaxy: Fri, 1:20, 4:30, 7:35, 10:40; 

Sat, 10:00am, 1:00, 4:05, 7:10, 10:15pm; Sun, 10:20am, 12:15, 
1:25, 4:30, 7:35, 10:40pm; Mon, 1:30, 4:40, 7:45, 11:05; 

Tue, 1:25,3:30, 10:00; Wed, 1:00,4:00,7:30, 10:45; 

Thu (8/14), 11:35am, 2:50pm 
Master Pancake: Jaws; Fri, 7:00, 10:00 
Lolita: Mon, 7:00pm 

Lynch: Lost Highway: Mon, 3:45pm; Wed, 7:00pm 

Rear Window: Sat, 11:00am; Sun, 4:00pm; Tue, 4:30pm 

Bangarang!: Sneakers: Sun, 7:00pm 

Weird Wednesday: Summer Camp Nightmare: Wed, 10:15pm 

Tough Guy Cinema: The Warriors; Tue, 7:30pm 


ALAMO DRAFTHOUSE LAKELINE 

14028 U.S. 183 N., Bldg. F, 512/861-7070. 

Boyhood: Fri, 9:50am, 1:35, 6:00, 9:30pm; Sat, 9:50am, 

1:50, 6:10, 9:30pm; Sun, 10:35am, 2:30, 6:20, 9:35pm; 

Mon-Tue, 11:00am, 1:40,6:25, 10:20pm; Wed, 11:35am, 3:25, 
6:10,9:05pm;Thu (8/14), 10:55am, 1:55,6:20pm 
Dawn of the Planet of the Apes: Fri, 5:15, 8:10; Sat, 11:00am, 

1:40, 11:00pm; Sun, 11:00am, 2:10, 10:15pm; Mon, 11:00am, 
1:50, 10:50pm;Tue, 10:45am, 1:50, 6:50pm 
Dragon BallZ: Battle of the Gods: Sun, 4:35pm; Tue, 10:00pm 
*Geton Up: Fri, 10:50am, 1:50,6:20,9:40pm; Sat, 10:20am, 

2:30, 6:00, 9:20pm; Sun, 11:10am, 2:45, 6:00, 9:20pm; 

Mon, 10:50am, 2:40, 6:00, 9:30pm;Tue, 11:10am, 5:20, 

7:15, 10:35pm; Wed, 11:15am, 2:40, 10:00pm; 

Thu (8/14), 11:15am, 2:40pm 
*Guardians of the Galaxy: Fri, 9:35am, 11:55, 1:05, 3:00, 

4:05, 6:30, 7:20, 8:20, 10:55, 11:30pm; Sat, 9:35am, 11:55, 
1:05, 3:00, 4:05, 5:40, 6:30, 7:20, 8:50, 10:40, 11:55pm; 

Sun, 10:45am, 12:20, 1:25, 3:30, 6:35, 7:25, 10:30, 11:10pm; 
Mon, 10:30am, 1:05, 3:15, 4:00, 5:25, 7:20, 8:25, 10:55, 

1 1:25pm; Tue, 10:30am, 1:05, 3:00, 4:00, 7:25, 8:00, 10:30, 
11:05pm; Wed, 12:10,1:05,3:15,4:10,6:20,9:25,11:00; 

Thu (8/14), 10:00am, 12:55, 1:05, 4:00, 4:10, 5:40, 7:25, 10:25pm 
*Guardians of the Galaxy (3-D): Fri, 9:50am, 11:20pm; 

Sat, 5:20, 8:25; Sun, 3:10, 6:10; Mon, 3:35, 6:50; Tue, 3:35pm; 
Wed, 3:30pm; Thu (8/14), 2:45pm 
*The Hundred-Foot Journey: Fri, 10:05am, 12:35, 3:40, 6:55, 
10:15pm; Sat, 10:05am, 12:35, 3:40, 6:55, 10:00pm; 

Sun, 10:25am, 1:50,4:55,8:30, 10:10pm; Mon, 10:00am, 

11:50, 2:55, 6:10, 9:40pm;Tue, 10:00am, 11:50,2:55,6:10, 
9:15pm; Wed, 10:00am, 12:35,3:40, 6:00, 10:30pm;Thu 
(8/14), 10:30am, 1:35,4:40,6:00,9:15pm 
*lnto the Storm: Fri, 11:25am, 2:20, 5:30, 8:35, 11:10pm; 

Sat, 12:10, 2:50, 5:30, 8:15, 10:50; Sun, 11:40am, 2:20, 5:30, 
8:20, 10:45pm; Mon, 11:10am, 2:30, 5:30, 8:10, 10:50pm; 

Tue, 11:10am, 2:30, 5:40, 8:10, 10:50pm; Wed, 12:10, 2:50, 

5:25, 8:20, 10:40; Thu (8/14), 1 1:55am, 2:35, 5:00, 
7:45,10:15pm 

*Let’s Be Cops; Tue, 10:30pm; Wed, 10:10am, 1:10, 3:55, 6:40, 
9:40, ll:20pm;Thu (8/14), 10:10am, 12:30,3:15, 

6:40, 10:05pm 

*Lucy: Fri-Sat, 11:45am, 3:25, 5:30, 8:35, 11:30pm; Sun, 9:45am, 
2:55, 5:20, 7:50, 9:20pm; Mon, 10:25am, 4:20, 5:20, 

8:10, 10:00pm;Tue, 10:25am, 4:20, 5:30, 8:40, 11:00pm; 

Wed, 10:40am, 1:10,3:40, 10:00pm; Thu (8/14), 10:40am, 
1:10,3:40pm 

Monty Python Live (Mostly): Sun, 7:00pm 

Snowpiercer: Fri-Sat, 12:20pm; Sun, 11:50am; Mon-Tue, 1:15pm 

Stand by Me: Wed, 7:00pm 

*Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Fri, 1 1:05am, 2:00, 4:50, 7:45, 
10:35pm; Sat, 11:20am, 2:05, 5:00, 7:50, 10:15, 10:55pm; 

Sun, 10:15am, 1:00, 4:10, 5:40, 8:00, 10:50, 11:30pm; 

Mon, 11:20am, 2:05, 5:00, 7:45, 9:10, 10:35pm; Tue, 11:20am, 
2:10, 5:00, 7:45, 10:50pm; Wed, noon, 2:45, 5:35, 8:30, 10:45; 
Thu (8/14), 11:05am, 2:45, 5:35, 8:25, 11:15pm 
*Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (3-D): Fri, 12:55pm; Sat, 2:40pm; 
Sun, 12:10pm; Mon-Tue, 12:55pm; Wed, 12:50pm; 

Thu (8/14), 12:05pm 

Kids’ Camp: Tim Burton’s Corpse Bride: Fri-Sun, 10:00am; 

Mon-Tue, 10:45am; Wed, 10:40am; Thu (8/14), 10:00am 
Wet Hot American Summer: Mon, 7:00pm 


ALAMO DRAFTHOUSE SLAUGHTER LANE 

5701 W. Slaughter Ln., 512/476-1320. Showtimes at this 
venue are subject to frequent change. Piease confirm daiiy 
times by phone or website. 

Kids: An American Tail: Fri, 10:25am; Sat, 10:00am; Sun, 9:25am; 
Mon, 10:25am;Tue, 10:15am; Wed, 10:15am, 3:50pm; 

Thu (8/14), 9:25am 

Boyhood: Fri, 12:05, 4:30, 6:00, 9:50; Sat, 11:00am, 3:05, 6:00, 
9:50pm; Sun, 12:20, 2:05, 6:00, 9:50; Mon, 11:00am, 3:00, 
4:00,6:50, 10:50pm; Tue, 11:00am, 3:00, 4:00, 6:50, 10:15pm; 
Wed, 1:35,2:10, 7:55, 9:05; Thu (8/14), 10:50am, 2:50, 3:45, 
7:35,9:20pm 

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes: Fri-Sat, 10:30am, 4:20, 7:30, 
10:40pm; Sun, 11:45am, 4:30, 7:45, 10:50pm; Mon, 10:30am, 
4:20, 7:30, 10:40pm; Tue, 10:30am, 4:20, 7:35pm 
*Guardians of the Galaxy: Fri, 10:10am, 11:45, 1:15, 2:55, 8:00, 
8:25, 10:15, 11:15pm; Sat, 10:15am, 10:35, 11:25, 1:50, 2:30, 
5:05, 7:45, 8:20, 10:20, 11:00pm; Sun, 10:35am, 11:00, 1:40, 
3:10,6:55, 10:15, 10:55, 11:30pm; Mon, 10:15am, 11:20, 
12:45,1:20,2:30,8:10,9:30, 11:15pm; Tue, 10:15am, 11:20, 
12:35, 1:20,2:30,8:10,9:30, 10:00, 11:20pm; Wed, noon, 1:00, 
3:35, 3:50, 6:00, 9:25, 10:35, 10:50; Thu (8/14), 10:15am, 
11:15, 12:35, 1:20, 2:30, 7:50, 9:35, 10:00, 11:10pm 
*Guardians of the Galaxy (3-D): Fri-Sat, 4:05, 7:10; Sun, 4:55, 
8:00; Mon-Tue, 4:30, 6:25; Wed, 11:15am, 6:45pm; 

Thu (8/14), 4:30, 6:25 

*lnto the Storm: Fri, 11:05am, 1:35, 4:20, 6:55,9:30pm; 

Sat, 10:05am, 1:30, 4:50, 7:30, 10:10pm; Sun, 12:05, 2:45, 
5:30, 7:45, 10:35; Mon, 11:45am, 2:15, 4:45, 7:35, 10:05pm; 
Tue, 11:45am, 2:15, 4:45, 7:35, 10:35pm; Wed, 10:50am, 2:50, 
5:20, 8:00, 11:45pm; Thu (8/14), 11:30am, 2:00, 4:45, 
7:05,11:20pm 

net’s Be Cops; Tue, 10:50pm; Wed, 10:30am, 1:15,4:25, 7:35, 
10:15pm; Thu (8/14), 11:45am, 2:20, 5:20, 8:10, 10:55pm 
Lucy: Fri, 11:25am, 1:55, 4:50, 7:45, 11:30pm; Sat, 12:25, 2:50, 
5:25,8:05, 11:25; Sun, 10:55am, 1:25,4:25,8:15, 11:15pm; 
Mon, 12:05, 2:45, 5:25, 7:55, 10:35; Tue, 12:05, 2:45, 5:25, 
7:55, 10:45; Wed, 12:20,5:30, 7:00,9:30; Thu (8/14), 11:10am, 
4:30,7:00,9:40pm 

The Milky Way: Every Mother Has a Story: Sat, 1:00pm 
Action Pack: Monty Python and the Holy Grail Quote-Aiong: 

Mon, 10:20pm 

Monty Python Live (Mostly): Sun, 7:15pm 
Planes: Fire & Rescue: Fri-Sat, 1:45pm; Sun, 2:00pm; 

Mon-Tue, 1:45pm; Wed, 12:35pm;Thu (8/14), 1:45pm 
Girlie Night: Steel Magnolias: Wed, 7:15pm 


*Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Fri, 9:55am, 12:50, 9:10pm; 
Sat, 9:50am, 12:40, 9:10pm; Sun, 9:55am, 12:40, 9:10pm; 
Mon-Tue, 10:00am, 6:00, 9:00pm; Wed, 12:35,6:20,9:50; 
Thu (8/14), 10:00am, 6:00, 9:00pm 
*Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (3-D): Fri-Sun, 3:35, 6:25; 
Mon-Tue, 12:55, 3:40; Wed, 10:15am, 3:50pm; 

Thu (8/14), 12:55,3:25 

Action Pack: Totally Eighties Sing-Along Dance Party: 

Sat, 10:35pm 

Action Pack: Ultimate Nineties Party: Fri, 10:30pm 
1/ann/n'; Thu (8/14), 7:15pm 

Wet Hot American Summer Quote-Aiong: Mon-Tue, 7:15pm; 
Tue, 7:15pm 


ALAMO DRAFTHOUSE VILLAGE 2700 W. Anderson, 
512/459-7090. Tuesday matinee Baby Day shows (first show 
of the day) are intended for parents and their chiidren younger 
than 6. Showtimes at this venue are subject to frequent 
change. Piease confirm daiiy times by phone or website. 
*Guardians of the Galaxy: Fri, 10:35am, 11:40, 1:10, 2:40, 4:10, 
6:30, 7:15, 9:30, 10:15pm; Sat, 9:20am, 10:50, 12:20, 1:50, 
3:45,4:50, 7:50, 10:50, 11:40pm; Sun, 9:30am, 10:50, 12:30, 
1:50,3:30,4:50, 7:50,8:45, 10:50pm; Mon, 10:00am, 11:35, 
1:00, 2:50, 4:30, 7:30, 8:50, 10:30pm; Tue, noon, 2:50, 6:00, 
9:00, 10:15; Wed, 10:00am, 11:35, 1:00,2:50,4:30, 7:30,8:50, 
10:30pm; Thu (8/14), 10:30am, 1:30, 3:10, 7:30, 8:50, 10:30pm 
*Guardians of the Galaxy (3-D): Sat, 8:40pm 
Master Pancake: Jaws; Sat, 7:00, 10:00 
*Lucy: Fri, 1:35, 4:00, 5:40, 8:10; Sat, 1:30, 4:05, 6:35, 9:10; 

Sun, 12:45, 3:15, 6:00, 11:15; Mon, 1:15, 3:50, 6:35, 9:15; 

Tue, 1:00, 3:30, 7:45, 10:00; Wed, 1:15, 3:50, 6:35, 9:15; 

Thu (8/14), 12:35,4:30,6:35,11:00 
Monty Python Live (Mostly): Sun, 7:00pm; Thu (8/14), 7:00pm 
Action Pack: Pee-wee’s Big Adventure Quote-Aiong: Wed, 7:00pm 
Kids: Rango: Fri, 10:15am; Sat, 10:30am; Sun, 9:55am; 

Mon, 10:45am;Tue, 11:00am; Wed, 10:45am; 

Thu (8/14), 9:45am 

The Rocky Horror Picture Show: Sat, 12mid 
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Fri, 12:40, 3:20, 6:00, 8:40, 1 1:20; 
Sat, 10:15am, 1:00, 3:20, 9:10pm; Sun, 10:25am, 4:20, 6:30, 
9:15pm; Mon, 10:25am, 1:45, 6:10, 9:40pm; Tue, 10:20am, 2:10, 
4:55, 7:00pm; Wed, 10:25am, 1:45, 6:10, 9:40pm; 

Thu (8/14), 10:15am, 1:00, 3:50, 6:10, 9:15pm 
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (3-D): Fri, 10:00am; Sat, 6:00pm; 

Sun, 1:20pm; Mon, 4:10pm; Tue, 9:40pm; Wed, 4:10pm 
Action Pack: Totally Eighties Sing-Along Dance Party: Fri, 10:40pm 


ARBOR CINEMA @ GREAT HILLS 9828 Great Hills Trail 
(atJollyvIlle), 512/231-9742. Discounts daiiy before 6pm. 
Begin Again: Fri-Mon, 3:10, 6:50; Tue, 3:10pm; Wed, 3:10, 6:50; 

Thu (8/14), 3:10pm 

Boyhood: 12:20, 1:10,4:00,5:00,7:50,9:20 
Chef (CC/DVS): 12:30, 3:20, 6:40, 9:30 
Code e/acfc Fri-Mon, 12:40, 9:35; Tue, 12:40pm; Wed, 12:40,9:35; 
Thu (8/14), 12:40pm 
RiffTrax Live: Godzilla: The (8/14), 7:00pm 
The Hundred-Foot Journey (CC/DVS): noon, 3:00, 7:00, 10:00 
Magic in the Moonlight (CC/DVS): 12:10, 2:40, 5:10, 7:40, 10:10 
A Most Wanted Man (CC/DVS): 12:50,3:50, 7:10, 10:05 
Wish I IVas Here (CC/DVS): 1:00, 3:40, 7:20, 9:55 


BARTON CREEK SQUARE (AMC) Barton Creek Square 
mall, MoPac & Highway 360, 888/262-4386. Matinee 
discounts avaiiabie before 4pm daiiy. BringYour Baby 
matinees the first Tuesday of every month. 

Boyhood (digital): Fri-Sat, 10:55am, 1:05,5:05, 7:15, 11:00pm; 
Sun, 10:55am, 1:05, 5:05, 7:15, 10:45pm 
*Dawn of the Planet of the Apes (CC/DVS, digital): 

Fri-Sat, 10:50am, 5:10, 8:10, 11:10pm; Sun, 10:00am, 
5:15,8:10pm 

Get on Up (CC/DVS, digital): Fri-Sat, 10:00am, 1:15, 4:30, 7:40, 
10:55pm; Sun, 10:00am, 1:15,4:30, 7:40, 10:50pm 

Guardians of the Galaxy (3-D, CC/DVS): Fri-Sun, 9:50am, 12:40, 
3:35,5:35,6:30,9:30pm 

Guardians of the Galaxy (3-D, IMAX): Fri-Sun, 10:35am, 1:35, 

4:30, 7:30, 10:25pm 

Guardians of the Galaxy (CC/DVS, digital): Fri-Sat, 11:25am, 2:20, 
8:30, 11:20pm; Sun, 11:25am, 2:20, 8:30pm 
*Hercuies (CC/DVS, digital): Fri-Sun, 4:00, 6:25 
The Hundred-Foot Journey (CC/DVS, digital): Fri-Sat, 10:45am, 
2:00, 4:50, 7:50, 10:50pm; Sun, 10:45am, 2:00, 4:50, 

7:50, 10:40pm 

Into the Storm (CC/DVS, digital): Fri-Sat, 10:55am, 1:20, 4:00, 
6:20,8:40, 11:00pm; Sun, 10:55am, 1:20,4:00,6:20, 

8:35, 10:50pm 

Let’s Be Cops (digital): Wed-Thu (8/14), 12:15, 8:00 
*Lucy (CC/DVS, digital): Fri-Sat, 10:25am, 2:40, 5:00, 8:45, 
10:50pm; Sun, 10:25am, 2:40, 5:00, 8:35, 10:45pm 
A Most IVanted Man (CC, digital): Fri-Sat, 11:35am, 2:30, 5:30, 
8:20, 11:10pm; Sun, 11:35am, 2:30, 5:30, 8:20pm 
*Planes: Fire & Rescue (CC/DVS, digital): Fri-Sat, 9:45am, 11:50, 
1:55pm; Sun, 11:00am 
Ride Along (digital): Mon-Wed, 9:30pm 
Step Up: All In (3-D, CC/DVS): Fri-Sun, 1:55, 7:30 
Step Up: All In (CC/DVS, digital): Fri-Sun, 10:55am, 

4:40,10:15pm 

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (3-D, CC/DVS): Fri-Sun, 11:10am, 
1:45, 2:50, 4:15, 7:00, 8:00, 9:45pm 
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (CC/DVS, digital): Fri-Sat, 9:45am, 
12:15, 5:20, 8:55, 10:40, 11:25pm; Sun, 9:50am, 12:15, 5:20, 
8:55, 10:35pm 

Wish I IVas Here (CC/DVS, digital): Fri-Sat, 2:10pm; Sun, 1:10pm 


BULLOCK TEXAS STATE HISTORY MUSEUM 

1800 N. Congress, 512/936-4629. Call theatre for 
shows and times. 

D-Day: Normandy 1944 (3-D): Fri-Sat, 11:00am, 2:00, 5:00pm; 

Sun, 2:00, 5:00; Mon-Thu (8/14), 11:00am, 2:00, 5:00pm 
Texas: The Big Picture: Fri, 10:00am; Sat, noon; 

Mon-Thu (8/14), noon 

Titans of the Ice Age (3-D): Fri, noon, 3:00; Sat, 10:00am, 3:00pm; 
Sun, 3:00pm; Mon-Thu (8/14), 10:00am, 3:00pm 

Under the Sea 3D (3-D): 1:00, 4:00 


CINEMARK CEDAR PARK 1335 E. Whitestone, 
800/326-3264. Call theatre for complete list of movies 
and showtimes. 

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes (digital): Fri-Sun, 11:40am, 5:00, 
10:20pm; Mon, 10:30pm; Tue, 11:40am, 5:00, 10:20pm 
Get on Up (digital): Fri-Tue, 11:20am, 3:00, 6:40, 9:50pm 

NCM Fathom: The Giver: World Premiere Red Carpet Event: 

Mon, 7:00pm 

RiffTrax Live: Godzilla: Thu (8/14), 7:00pm 
Guardians of the Galaxy (3-D): Fri-Tue, 9:10am, 10:40, 12:10, 
1:40, 3:10, 4:40, 6:20, 7:40, 9:20, 10:30pm 
Guardians of the Galaxy (digital): Fri-Tue, 9:40am, 12:40, 4:00, 
7:10,10:10pm 


Hercules (3-D): Fri-Tue, 2:00, 7:30 

Hercules (digital): Fri-Mon, 11:30am, 4:50, 10:00pm; 

Tue, 11:30am, 4:50pm 

The Hundred-Foot Journey (digital): Fri-Tue, 9:30am, 12:30, 3:30, 
6:45,9:40pm 

Into the Storm (digital): Fri-Sat, 9:50am, 12:20, 2:50, 5:20, 7:50, 
10:20pm; Sun, 12:20, 2:50, 5:20, 7:50, 10:20; Mon, 9:50am, 
12:20, 2:50, 5:20, 7:50, 10:20pm; Tue, 12:20, 2:50, 5:20, 

7:50, 10:20 

Let’s Be Cops (digital): Tue, 10:00pm 

Lucy (digital): Fri-Mon, 11:10am, 1:30, 4:10, 6:50, 9:30pm; 

Tue, 1:30,4:10,6:50,9:30 

Kids: Mr. Peabody & Sherman: Mon-Thu (8/14), 10:00am 
Planes: Fire & Rescue (digital): Fri-Sun, 9:20am, 2:40, 8:00pm; 

Mon, 2:40pm; Tue, 9:20am, 2:40, 8:00pm 
Step Up: All In (3-D): Fri-Tue, 10:20am, 9:50pm 
Step Up: All In (digital): Fri-Tue, 1:00, 3:50, 7:00 
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (3-D): Fri-Tue, 9:00am, 10:50, 1:50, 
4:30,6:30,10:10pm 

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (digital): Fri-Tue, 10:00am, 12:50, 
3:40,7:20,9:10pm 


CINEMARK HILL COUNTRY GALLERIA 14 

12812 Hill Country Blvd., 800/326-3264. 

And So It Goes (digital): Fri-Sat, 10:45am, 1:20, 4:00, 6:30, 
9:15pm; Sun, 10:45am, 6:30, 9:15pm; Mon, 10:45am, 1:20, 
4:00, 10:30pm; Tue, 10:45am, 1:20, 4:00, 6:30pm 
Classic: Beveriy Hills Cop: Sun, 2:00pm; Wed, 2:00, 7:00 
Boyhood (CineArts Digital): Fri-Tue, noon, 3:50, 7:50 
Geton Up (digital): Fri-Tue, ll:55am,3:15, 6:40, 10:05pm 
NCM Fathom: The Giver: World Premiere Red Carpet Event: 

Mon, 7:00pm 

RiffTrax Live: Godzilla: Thu (8/14), 7:00pm 
Guardians of the Galaxy (3-D): Fri-Tue, 10:45am, 11:25, 1:50, 
2:35,4:55,5:45,8:00,9:05pm 

Guardians of the Galaxy (digital): Fri-Tue, 12:30, 3:40, 6:50, 10:00 
Hercules (digital): Fri-Mon, 7:05, 9:45;Tue, 7:05pm 
The Hundred-Foot Journey (digital): Fri-Tue, 12:50,4:10, 
7:15,10:20 

Into the Storm (digital): Fri-Tue, 11:45am, 2:20, 5:00, 
7:35,10:10pm 

Let’s Be Cops (digital): Tue, 10:00, 10:45 
Lucy (digital): Fri-Tue, 10:55am, 1:30,4:05,6:55,9:30pm 
A Most Wanted Man (digital): Fri-Tue, 12:45,3:55, 7:00, 10:05 
Kids: Mr. Peabody & Sherman: Wed, 10:00am 
Planes: Fire & Rescue (3-D): Fri-Tue, 4:20pm 
Planes: Fire & Rescue (digital): Fri-Tue, 11:20am, 1:45pm 
Step Up: All In (3-D): Fri-Tue, 11:00am, 1:55, 7:45pm 
Step Up: All In (digital): Fri-Tue, 4:50, 10:30 
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (3-D): Fri-Tue, 11:15am, 12:35,3:20, 
7:30, 10:15pm; Wed, 11:15am, 7:30pm 
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (digital): Fri-Tue, 2:00, 4:45, 6:05, 
8:50; Wed, 2:00, 4:45 


CINEMARK MOVIES 8 ROUND ROCK 2120 N. Mays, 
Round Rock, 512/388-2848. Discounts daily before 5pm. 
The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (digital): Fri-Sun, 9:15pm 
6/ended (digital): Fri-Sun, 10:05am, 1:05,3:45, 7:05,9:30pm 

Captain America: The Winter Soldier (digital): Fri-Sun, 2:00, 8:15 
Edge of Tomorrow (3-D): Fri-Sun, 11:00am, 5:15pm 
Edge of Tomorrow (digital): Fri, 10:00am, 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:00, 
12:01am; Sat, 10:00am, 1:00,4:00, 7:00, 10:00, 11:45pm; 

Sun, 10:00am, 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:00pm 
The Fault in Our Stars (digital): Fri-Sun, 10:15am, 1:15, 4:15, 
7:15,10:05pm 

Godzilla (3-D): Fri-Sun, 1:30, 7:30 

Godzilla (digital): Fri, 10:30am, 4:30, 10:15, 11:45pm; 

Sat, 10:30am, 4:30, 10:15, 11:30pm; Sun, 10:30am, 
4:30,10:15pm 

Kids: Mr. Peabody & Sherman: Mon-Thu (8/14), 10:00am 
Rio 2 (3-D): Fri-Sun, 10:00am, 3:30pm 
Rio 2 (digital): Fri-Sun, 12:45, 6:45 

X-Men: Days of Future Past (3-D): Fri-Sun, 12:15, 3:15, 6:30, 9:45 
X-Men: Days of Future Past (digital): Fri, 10:45am, 1:45, 4:45, 
8:00, 11:15pm; Sat, 10:45am, 1:45, 4:45, 8:00, 11:00pm; 

Sun, 10:45am, 1:45,4:45,8:00pm 


CINEMARK ROUND ROCK 4401 N. 1-35, Round Rock, 
800/326-3264. Cost for 3-D shows is regular ticket price 
plus a $3.50 premium. 

And So It Goes (digital): Fri-Mon, 11:40am, 2:25, 5:05, 7:35, 
10:25pm; Tue, 11:40am, 2:25, 5:05, 7:35pm; Wed, 2:25, 7:35; 
Thu (8/14), 2:25, 7:40 

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes (3-D): Fri-Wed, 10:20am, 3:50, 
9:20pm; Thu (8/14), 10:20am, 3:50pm 
Dawn of the Planet ohhe Apes (digital): Fri-Wed, 12:45, 6:45; 
Thu (8/14), 12:45pm 

Get on Up (digital): 12:35, 3:45, 6:40, 10:05 
Guardians of the Galaxy (3-D): Fri-Wed, 10:00am, 10:25, 

11:00, noon, 2:00, 3:00, 5:00, 6:30, 9:30, 11:00pm; Thu 
(8/14), 10:00am, 10:25, 11:00, noon, 2:00, 3:00, 6:30, 9:30pm 
Guardians of the Galaxy (digital): Fri-Wed, 1:00, 4:15, 7:30, 8:00, 
10:30;Thu (8/14), 1:00, 4:15, 7:30, 10:30 
Hercules (3-D): Fri-Wed, 1:50, 10:15; Thu (8/14), 1:50pm 
Hercules (digital): Fri-Wed, 10:05am, 4:40, 7:25pm; 

Thu (8/14), 10:05am, 4:40pm 

The Hundred-Foot Journey (digital): 10:15am, 1:15,4:10, 
7:10,10:10pm 

Into the Storm (digital): 9:55am, 12:15, 2:45, 5:30, 
8:15,10:40pm 

Let’s Be Cops (digital): Tue, 10:00, 11:00; Wed, 11:40am, 5:05, 
10:25pm;Thu (8/14), 11:40am, 5:05pm 
Lucy (digital): Fri-Wed, 11:45am, 2:30, 5:15, 7:50, 10:20pm; 

Thu (8/14), 11:45am, 2:30, 5:15pm 
Planes: Fire & Rescue (3-D): Fri-Wed, 1:35, 6:55; Thu 
(8/14), 1:35pm 

Planes: Fire & Rescue (digital): Fri-Mon, 10:10am, 4:20, 9:50pm; 
Tue, 10:10am, 4:20pm; Wed, 10:10am, 4:20,9:50pm; 

Thu (8/14), 10:10am, 4:20pm 
Step Up: All In (3-D): 10:45am, 4:30, 10:00pm 

Step Up: All In (digital): 1:45, 7:15 

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (3-D): 10:35am, 11:30, 1:30, 4:00, 
7:00,9:45pm 

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (digital): 2:15, 4:45, 7:45, 10:45 


CINEMARK SOUTHPARK MEADOWS 9900 S. 1-35, 
800/326-3264. Cost for 3-D shows is regular ticket price 
plus a $3.50 premium. 

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes (3-D): Fri-Tue, 10:25am, 
4:00,9:30pm 

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes (digital): Fri-Tue, 12:50, 6:20 
Geton Up (digital): Fri-Tue, 10:10am, 1:15, 4:20, 7:30, 10:35pm 
NCM Fathom: The Giver: World Premiere Red Carpet Event: 

Mon, 7:00pm 

RiffTrax Live: Godzilla: Thu (8/14), 7:00pm 
Guardians of the Galaxy (3-D): Fri-Tue, 10:05am, 11:00, noon, 
2:00, 3:00, 5:00, 6:05, 8:00, 9:15pm 


Guardians of the Galaxy (digital): Fri-Tue, 1:00, 4:05, 7:00, 10:00 
Hercules (3-D): Fri-Tue, 1:30, 7:05 
Hercules (digital): Fri-Tue, 10:20am, 3:50, 9:40pm 
The Hundred-Foot Journey (digital): Fri-Tue, 10:15am, 1:05,3:55, 
6:50,9:45pm 

Into the Storm (digital): Fri-Tue, 10:35am, 12:55, 3:20, 6:10, 
9:10pm 

Let’s Be Cops (digital): Tue, 10:00pm 

Lucy (digital): Fri-Tue, 10:30am, 1:10,3:45, 7:20,9:35pm 

Planes: Fire & Rescue (3-D): Fri-Sun, 12:30, 4:50, 10:15; 

Mon, 12:30pm; Tue, 12:30,4:50, 10:15 
Planes: Fire & Rescue (digital): Fri-Sun, 10:15am, 2:40, 7:15pm; 

Mon, 10:15am, 2:40pm; Tue, 10:15am, 2:40, 7:15pm 
The Purge: Anarchy (digital): Fri-Mon, 10:45am, 1:35, 4:15, 6:45, 
10:10pm; Tue, 10:45am, 1:35,4:15, 6:45pm 
Step Up: All In (3-D): Fri-Tue, 10:40am, 4:10, 9:50pm 
Step Up: All In (digital): Fri-Tue, 1:25, 6:55 
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (3-D): Fri-Tue, 10:00am, 10:55, 
12:45,3:30,6:15,9:00pm 

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (digital): Fri-Tue, 1:40, 4:25, 
7:10,9:55 


CINEMARK STONE HILL TOWN CENTER 

18820 Hilltop Commercial Dr. (southwest corner 
of highways 130 & 45), 512/251-0938. 

Get on Up (digital): Fri-Sun, 1 1:00am, 2:45, 6:20, 9:30pm; 

Mon-Wed, 11:00am, 2:45, 6:10, 9:20pm 
RiffTrax Live: Godzilla:Thu (8/14), 7:00pm 
Guardians of the Galaxy (3-D): Fri-Sun, 10:00am, 11:30,2:30, 
4:00, 5:30, 8:45pm; Mon-Wed, 10:00am, 11:30, 2:30, 3:40, 5:30, 
8:45pm 

Guardians of the Gafaxy (digital): Fri-Sun, 1:00, 7:00, 10:00; 
Mon-Wed, 12:50,6:40,9:40 

Hercules (digital): Fri-Mon, 1:00, 4:00, 6:45, 9:30; Tue, 1:00, 4:00, 
6:45; Wed, 1:00,4:00,6:45,9:30 
Into the Storm (digital): Fri-Sun, 11:15am, 2:00, 4:45, 7:30, 
10:10pm; Mon-Wed, 11:15am, 2:00, 4:45, 7:30, 10:00pm 
Let’s Be Cops (digital): Tue, 10:00pm 
Lucy (digital): Fri-Wed, 10:30am, 1:30,4:30, 7:30, 10:00pm 
Planes: Fire & Rescue (digital): Fri-Wed, 10:30am 
Step Up: All In (3-D): Fri-Wed, 10:00am, 3:40, 9:20pm 
Step Up: All In (digital): Fri-Wed, 12:50, 6:30 
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (3-D): Fri-Wed, 10:00am, 11:30, 
2:30,5:30,8:30pm 

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (digital): Fri-Wed, 1:00, 4:00, 

7:00, 10:00 


FLIX BREWHOUSE 2200 S. 1-35, Round Rock, 
512/244-3549. 

Kids: Babe: Sat, 10:30am 

*Get on Up (digital): Fri, 10:10am, 4:00, 7:35, 10:05pm; 

Sat, 4:00, 7:35, 10:05; Sun, 10:10am, 4:00, 10:05pm; 

Mon, 10:10am, 4:00, 7:40, 10:05pm; Tue, 10:10am, 4:00, 7:45, 
10:05pm; Wed, 10:10am, 4:00, 10:05pm; Thu (8/14), 10:10am, 
4:00, 7:40, 10:05pm 

*Guardians of the Galaxy (3-D): 12:45pm 
* Guardians of the Gafaxy (digital): Fri-Sat, 10:45am, 12:30,3:45, 
7:00, 7:45, 8:30pm; Sun-Thu (8/14), 10:45am, 12:30, 3:45, 
7:00,8:30pm 

*The Hundred-Foot Journey (digital): 12:15, 3:15, 6:30, 10:15 

*lnto the Storm (digital): 11:30am, 2:00, 4:30, 6:00, 9:55pm 

*Lucy (digital): 10:00am, 1:30, 3:30, 7:15, 10:50pm 

Classic: Sin City: Wed, 7:30pm 

*Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (3-D): 10:00am 

*Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (digital): 1:45, 4:45, 7:30, 9:30 


GALAXY HIGHLAND 10 N. 1-35 & Middle Fiskville, 
512/467-7305. No one under 18 will be allowed in the 
theatre on Friday or Saturday after 7pm without an adult. 
*Get on Up (digital): Fri, 12:55, 3:55, 7:05, 10:00; 

Sat-Tue, 10:00am, 12:55,3:55, 7:05, 10:00pm 
* Guardians of the Gafaxy (digital): Fri-Sat, 10:00am, 10:30, 
12:55, 1:30, 3:50, 4:30, 6:45, 7:30, 9:45, 10:30, 12mid; 

Sun, 10:30am, 1:30, 4:30, 6:45, 7:30, 9:45, 10:30pm; 

Mon, 10:30am, 1:30,4:30, 7:30, 10:30pm; Tue, 10:00am, 10:30, 
12:55, 1:30, 3:50, 4:30, 6:45, 7:30, 10:30pm 
*Hercules (digital): Fri-Tue, 10:25am, 12:35,2:55,5:10, 
7:30,9:50pm 

*The Hundred-Foot Journey (digital): Fri, 1:00, 4:00, 6:45, 

9:30, 12mid; Sat, 10:20am, 1:00, 4:00, 6:45, 9:30, 12mid; 
Sun-Tue, 10:20am, 1:00, 4:00, 6:45, 9:30pm 
*lnto the Storm (digital): Fri-Sat, 10:20am, 12:30, 2:40, 4:55, 
7:10, 9:25, 11:30pm; Sun-Tue, 10:20am, 12:30, 2:40, 4:55, 
7:10,9:25pm 

*Let’s Be Cops (digital): Tue, 10:00pm; Wed-Thu (8/14), 11:00am, 
1:45,4:30, 7:15,10:00pm 

*tucy (digital): Fri-Sat, 11:00am, 1:10,3:10,5:20, 7:35,9:50, 
12mid; Sun-Tue, 11:00am, 1:10, 3:10, 5:20, 7:35, 9:50pm 
*Step Up: All In (3-D): Fri-Tue, 11:20am, 1:50pm 
*Step Up: All In (digital): Fri-Sat, 4:35, 7:05, 9:35, 12mid; 

Sun-Tue, 4:35, 7:05,9:35 

*Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (3-D): Fri-Sat, 7:00, 9:30, 12mid; 
Sun-Tue, 7:00, 9:30 

*Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (3-D, D-Box): Fri-Sat, 7:00, 9:30, 
12mid; Sun-Tue, 7:00, 9:30 

*Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (D-Box, digital): Fri-Tue, 1 1:00am, 
1:40,4:20pm 

*Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (digital): Fri-Tue, 11:00am, 11:35, 
1:40, 2:10, 4:20, 4:45, 7:30, 10:00pm 


GATEWAY THEATRE 9700 Stonelake, 512/416-5700. 
Discounts daily before 6pm. Cost for 3-D shows is regular 
ticket price plus a $3.50 premium. 

And So It Goes: Fri, 12:05, 2:40, 5:05, 7:35, 10:10; 

Sat-Sun, 10:00am, 12:05, 2:40, 5:05, 7:35, 10:10pm; 

Mon-Tue, 12:05, 2:40, 5:05, 7:35, 10:10 
*Dawn of the Planet of the Apes (CC/DVS): Fri-Mon, 1:10,4:15, 
7:25, 10:30; Tue, 11:50am, 3:10, 6:55pm 
Get on Up (CC/DVS): Fri, 11:50am, 3:45, 7:15,10:25pm; 
Sat-Sun, 10:00am, 11:50,3:45, 7:15, 10:25pm; 

Mon-Tue, 11:50am, 3:45, 7:15, 10:25pm 
*Guardians of the Galaxy (3-D, CC/DVS): Fri, 1:45, 4:00, 4:30, 
7:30, 9:45, 10:20; Sat-Sun, 10:15am, 1:45, 4:00, 4:30, 7:30, 
9:45, 10:20pm; Mon-Tue, 1:45, 4:00, 4:30, 7:30, 9:45, 10:20; 
Wed-Thu (8/14), 11:30am, 2:15, 5:00, 8:00, 10:45pm 
*Guardians of the Galaxy (CC/DVS): Fri-Tue, 12:30, 1:15, 3:30, 
6:30,7:00,9:30 

Hercules (CC/DVS): Fri, 11:55am, 2:25, 7:40pm; Sat-Sun, 1:55, 
7:40; Mon-Tue, 11:55am, 2:25, 7:40pm 
*Hercules (3-D, CC/DVS): Fri, 4:55, 10:10; Sat-Sun, 4:25, 10:10; 
Mon-Tue, 4:55, 10:10 

Into the Storm (CC/DVS): Fri, 11:45am, 2:20, 4:45, 7:20, 
9:55pm; Sat-Sun, 10:00am, 11:45, 2:20, 4:45, 7:20, 9:55pm; 
Mon-Tue, 11:45am, 2:20,4:45, 7:20,9:55pm 
Let’s Be Cops (CC/DVS): Tue, 10:00pm; Wed-Thu (8/14), noon, 
3:00,7:20,10:20 


Lucy (CC/DVS): Fri, 12:10, 12:45, 2:35, 3:10, 5:10, 5:30, 7:35, 
8:05, 10:15, 10:40; Sat-Sun, 10:00am, 12:10, 12:45, 2:35, 3:10, 
5:10, 5:30, 7:35, 8:05, 10:15, 10:40pm; Mon, 12:10, 12:45, 
2:35,3:10,5:10, 7:35, 10:15; Tue, 12:10, 12:45,2:35,3:10, 
5:10, 5:30, 7:35, 8:05, 10:15, 10:40 
Planes: Fire & Rescue (CC/DVS): Fri-Sun, 12:15, 2:25, 4:35; 

Mon-Tue, 12:15, 2:25, 4:35, 7:05, 9:40 
Step Up: All In (CC/DVS): Fri-Tue, 11:30am, 10:35pm 
*Step Up: All In (3-D, CC/DVS): Fri, 2:15, 5:00, 7:45; 

Sat-Sun, 10:30am, 2:15, 5:00, 7:45pm; Mon-Tue, 2:15, 5:00, 7:45 
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (CC/DVS): 1 1:30am, 2:00, 4:30, 
7:00,9:30pm 

*Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (3-D, CC/DVS): Fri, noon, 2:30, 
5:00, 7:30, 8:10, 10:00, 10:40; Sat-Sun, 10:10am, noon, 2:30, 
5:00, 7:30, 8:10, 10:00, 10:40pm; Mon-Thu (8/14), noon, 2:30, 
5:00, 7:30, 10:00 


IPIC THEATERS AUSTIN 3225 Amy Donovan Plaza (at 
the Domain, formerly Gold Class Cinema), 512/568-3400. 

Get on Up (Stadium Seating): Fri-Wed, 1 1:45am, 3:00, 6:15, 
9:35pm; Thu (8/14), noon, 3:00, 6:15,9:35 

Guardians of the Galaxy (Stadium Seating): 11:15am, 2:15, 5:00, 
7:45, 10:30pm 

Hercules (Stadium Seating): 1:45, 4:45, 7:30, 10:15 

The Hundred-Foot Journey (Stadium Seating): Fri-Wed, 10:30am, 
1:15,4:00, 7:15, 10:15pm;Thu (8/14), 11:00am, 4:00, 
7:15,10:15pm 

Into the Storm (Stadium Seating): 11:30am, 2:00, 4:30, 
7:00,9:30pm 

Lucy (Stadium Seating): 11:20am, 2:30, 5:15, 8:00, 10:40pm 

Sex Tape (Stadium Seating): 11:00am 

Step Up: All In (3-D): 10:15am, 1:00, 3:45, 6:30, 9:15pm 

*Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (3-D): 10:45am, 1:30, 4:15, 

6:45, 9:45pm 


LAKELINE Lakeline Mall at Highway 183 &RR 620, 
512/335-4793. Discounts daily before 6pm. 

*Dawn of the Planet of the Apes (CC/DVS): Fri-Tue, 1:20, 4:20, 
7:20, 10:20 

*Guardians of the Galaxy (3-D, CC/DVS): Fri-Tue, 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 
10:00, 10:30 

*Guardians of the Galaxy (CC/DVS): Fri-Tue, 1:30, 4:30, 7:30 
Into the Storm (CC/DVS): Fri-Tue, 1:30, 4:25, 7:25, 10:25 
Lucy (CC/DVS): Fri-Tue, 1:40,4:40, 7:40, 10:40 
*Maleficent (CC/DVS): Fri-Tue, 1:05,4:30, 7:05, 10:30 
Step Up: All In (CC/DVS): Fri-Tue, 10:15pm 
*Step Up: All In (3-D, CC/DVS): Fri-Tue, 1:10, 4:10, 7:10 
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (CC/DVS): Fri-Tue, 7:15pm 
*Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (3-D, CC/DVS): Fri-Tue, 1:15, 
4:15,9:45 

*Transformers: Age of Extinction (CC/DVS): Fri-Tue, 1:00,3:30, 
7:00,9:30 


METROPOLITAN S. 1-35 & Stassney, 512/447-0101. 
Discounts daily before 6pm. Cost for 3-D shows is regular 
ticket price plus a $3.50 premium. 

Cfief (CC/DVS): Fri-Tue, 12:40,4:20, 7:20, 10:10 
*Deepsea Challange 3-D (3-D): Fri-Tue, 12:10, 2:30, 5:15, 

7:45, 10:05 

The Fault in Our Stars (CC/DVS): Fri-Sat, 1:10, 4:05, 7:15, 10:10; 
Sun, 7:25, 10:15; Mon, 1:10,4:05, 10:30;Tue, 1:10,4:05, 
7:15,10:10 

Geton Up (CC/DVS): Fri-Tue, 12:25, 3:45, 7:15, 10:30 

NCM Fathom: The Giver: World Premiere Red Carpet Event: 

Mon, 7:00pm 

RiffTrax Live: Godzfffa; Thu (8/14), 7:00pm 
*Guardians of the Galaxy (3-D, CC/DVS): Fri-Tue, noon, 1:30, 3:00, 
4:00, 4:30, 6:30, 7:30, 9:25, 9:55, 10:25 
*Guardians of the Galaxy (CC/DVS): Fri-Tue, 1:00, 2:00, 5:00, 
7:00, 7:55, 10:45 

Hercules (CC/DVS): Fri-Tue, 2:15,4:50, 7:35, 10:15 
*Hercules (3-D, CC/DVS): Fri-Tue, 1:10, 4:10, 7:10, 9:40 
Into the Storm (CC/DVS): Fri-Tue, noon, 12:40, 2:20, 3:00, 4:45, 
5:30,7:20,8:10,9:45,10:40 

*The Purge: Anarchy (CC/DVS): Fri-Sat, 12:10, 2:40, 5:20, 8:05, 10:35; 
Sun, 5:20, 8:05, 10:35; Mon-Tue, 12:10, 2:40, 5:20, 8:05, 10:35 

*Transformers: Age of Extinction (3-D, CC/DVS): 

Fri-Tue, 3:30, 10:30 

*Transformers: Age of Extinction (CC/DVS): Fri-Tue, noon, 7:00 


MILLENNIUM THEATRE 1156 Hargrave, 512/472-6932. 
Located within the Millennium Youth Entertainment Complex. 
Adults, $6; children, $4. 

Transformers: Age of Extinction: Fri-Sat, 10:30am, 1:30, 5:00, 
8:00pm; Wed, 1:30, 4:30;Thu (8/14), 10:30am, 1:30,4:30pm 

Transformers: Age of Extinction (Free Matinee For Children): 

Wed, 10:30am 


MOVIEHOUSE & EATERY 8300 N. EM 620, Bldg B, 
512/501-3520. 

Geton Up: 1:45, 7:00,10:15 

Hercules: Fri, 11:00am, 1:30, 4:00, 8:45, 11:15pm; 

Sat-Thu (8/14), noon, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30, 10:00 
Into the Storm: 11:15am, 4:30pm 
Lucy: Fri, 11:15am, 4:45, 6:30, 11:15pm; 

Sat-Thu (8/14), 11:15am, 4:45, 7:00, 9:30pm 
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: 1:45pm 
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (3-D): 1 1:30am, 2:00, 4:30, 
7:15,9:45pm 

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (3-D, D-Box): 1 1:30am, 2:00, 4:30, 
7:15,9:45pm 


PARAMOUNT THEATRE 713 Congress, 512/472-5470. 
Classics: The Great Dictator: Sat, 2:00, 6:05; Sun, 3:45pm 
Classics: Modern Times: Sat, 4:25pm; Sun, 2:00, 6:05 
Classics: On the Waterfront: Tue, 9:25pm; Wed, 7:00pm 
Classics: Psycho; Thu (8/14), 7:00pm 
Classics: A Streetcar Warned Desfre; Tue, 7:00pm; Wed, 9:10pm 
Classics: Vertfgo; Thu (8/14), 9:10pm 


SOUTHWEST THEATERS AT LAKE CREEK 7 

13729 Research Blvd, Suite 1500, 512/291-3158. 

$2 matinees, $3 after 6pm, $1.50 extra for 3-D 
Captain America: The Winter Soldier: 1:00, 6:50, 10:00 
Earth to Echo: Fri-Sun, 10:45am, 11:45, 2:10, 4:30, 7:00, 9:20pm; 

Mon-Thu (8/14), 11:45am, 2:10, 4:30, 7:00, 9:20pm 
Edge of Tomorrow: 11:15am, 2:00, 7:30, 10:15pm 
Edge of Tomorrow (3-D): 4:45pm 
The Fault in Our Stars: 10:30am, 1:20, 4:15, 7:10, 10:10pm 
Godzilla: 1:30, 4:20, 7:10, 10:05 
Million Dollar Arm: 4:00pm 
A Million Ways to Die in the West; 9:40pm 
Mom’s Night Out: 1 1:00am 

Kids: Mr. Peabody & Sherman: Mon-Thu (8/14), 10:00am 
Kids: Rio 2: 11:30am, 2:00, 4:30, 7:00pm 
X-Men: Days of Future Past: 10:30am, 1:25, 7:20pm 
X-Men: Days of Future Past (3-D): 4:20, 10:20 


62 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE AUGUSTS, 2014 austinchronicle.com 


FILM LISTINGS 


STATESIDE AT THE PARAMOUNT 719 Congress, 512/472-5470. 

Classics: Notorious:lue, 9:45pm; Wed, 7:15pm 

Classics: Rebecca; Tue, 7:15pm; Wed, 9:15pm 

Classics: Rope; Thu (8/14), 7:15pm 

Classics: The Trouble With Harry: m (8/14), 8:55pm 


TEXAS SPIRIT THEATER AT THE BULLOCK TEXAS STATE 
HISTORY MUSEUM 1800 N. Congress, 512/936-8746. 

2001: A Space Odyssey: Tue, 7:00pm 


TINSELTOWN NORTH N. 1-35 & FM 1825, 512/989-8535. 

Cost for 3-D and XD shows is regular ticket price plus a premium. 
Classic: Beverly Hills Cop: Sun, 2:00pm; Wed, 2:00, 7:00 
Dawn of the Planet of the Apes (3-D): Fri-Tue, 1:30, 7:25 
Dawn of the Planet of the Apes (digital): Fri-Tue, 10:30am, 4:15, 10:05pm 
The Expendables Marathon: Thu (8/14), 3:15pm 
Get on Up (digital): Fri-Sat, 10:25am, 12:15, 2:05, 3:40, 5:25, 7:05, 

8:50, 10:30pm; Sun, 10:25am, 12:15, 3:40, 5:25, 7:05, 8:50, 10:30pm; 

Mon, 10:25am, 12:15, 2:05, 3:40, 5:25, 8:50, 10:30pm;Tue, 10:25am, 
12:15, 2:05, 3:40, 5:25, 7:05, 8:50, 10:30pm 
NCM Fathom: The G/ver; World Premiere Red Carpet Event: Mon, 7:00pm 
RiffTrax Live: Godzilla:Thu (8/14), 7:00pm 

Guardians of the Galaxy (3-D): Fri-Mon, 9:45am, 11:30, 12:05, 12:45, 2:30, 
3:50, 4:20, 5:35, 6:45, 8:30, 9:50, 10:15pm;Tue, 9:45am, 11:30, 12:05, 
12:45, 2:30, 3:50, 4:20, 5:35, 6:45, 8:30, 9:50, 10:15, 11:40pm 
Guardians of the Ga/axy (3-D, XD): Fri-Tue, 10:20am, 1:20, 7:20pm 
Guardians of the Galaxy (digital): Fri-Tue, 10:50am, 1:50, 3:05, 4:50, 6:05, 
7:50,9:05,10:45pm 

Hercules (3-D): Fri-Mon, 10:45am, 4:45, 10:35pm; Tue, 10:45am, 4:45pm 
Hercules (digital): Fri-Tue, 1:40, 7:35 

The Hundred-Foot Journey (digital): Fri-Tue, 9:50am, 12:50, 3:55, 7:00, 9:55pm 
Into the Storm (digital): Fri-Mon, 10:00am, 11:20, 12:35, 1:45, 3:10, 6:30, 
7:40, 9:20pm; Tue, 10:00am, 11:20, 12:35, 1:45,3:10,6:30, 7:40, 
9:20,11:45pm 

Into the Storm (XD): Fri-Tue, 4:25, 10:25 

Let’s Be Cops (digital): Tue, 10:00, 11:00, 12:01am 

Lucy (digital): Fri-Tue, 11:35am, 2:10, 4:40, 7:30, 10:10pm 

71 Most Wanted Man (digital): Fri-Tue, 10:05am, 1:05,4:10, 7:15, 10:20pm 

Planes: Fire & Rescue (digital): Fri-Tue, 11:05am, 1:35, 4:00pm 

The Purge: Anarchy (digital): Fri-Mon, 10:40am, 1:25, 4:15, 6:55, 9:40pm; 

Tue, 10:40am, 1:25,4:15,6:55pm 
Step Up: All In (3-D): Fri-Tue, 11:00am, 4:55, 10:40pm 
Step Up: All In (digital): Fri-Tue, 1:55, 7:45 

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (3-D): Fri-Tue, 9:45am, 10:35, 12:20, 1:10, 2:55, 
5:30, 6:20, 8:05, 10:40pm; Wed, 9:45am, 12:20, 2:55, 5:30, 8:05, 10:40pm 
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (digital): Fri-Mon, 1 1:25am, 2:00, 3:45, 4:35, 
7:10, 8:55, 9:45pm; Tue, 1 1:25am, 2:00, 3:45, 4:35, 7:10, 8:55, 9:45, 
11:30pm; Wed, 11:25am, 2:00, 4:35, 7:10,9:45pm 
Transformers: Age of Extinction (digital): Fri-Tue, 6:25, 10:00 


TINSELTOWN SOUTH S. 1-35 & Stassney, 512/326-4408. $10 
“special event” ticket prices apply to Indian films. 

Boyhood (CineArts Digital): 11:20am, 3:00, 6:45, 10:25pm 

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes (3-D): 11:35am, 2:45, 5:55,9:05pm 

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes (digital): 10:00am, 1:10, 4:20, 7:30, 10:35pm 

Deepsea Challange 3-D (3-D): 12:05, 2:30, 5:05, 7:35, 10:05 

De/iVer Us From £v// (digital): Fri, 6:10pm; Sat, 9:15pm; Sun-Thu (8/14), 6:10,9:15 

Earth to Echo (digital): 10:20am, 12:55, 3:15pm 

Entertainment (digital): 12:40, 3:50, 7:05, 10:20 

The Fluffy Movie (digital): Sun-Thu (8/14), 9:30pm 

Galipatam (digital): Fri, 9:00pm; Sat, 6:00pm 

The Hundred-Foot Journey {digital): 10:10am, 1:05,4:10, 7:15, 10:15pm 

Lucy (digital): 12:10, 2:50, 5:30, 8:00, 10:45 

Maleficent {3-D): 10:05am, 4:50pm 

Ma/ef/cent (digital): 11:50am, 6:20pm 

Kids: Mr. Peabody & Sherman: Tue-Wed, 10:00am 

Planes: Fire & Rescue (3-D): 11:25am, 4:40pm 

Planes: Fire & Rescue (digital): Fri-Sat, 2:20pm; Sun-Thu (8/14), 2:20, 7:10 

Run Raja Run (digital): Fri-Sat, 9:00pm 

Sex Tape (digital): Fri-Wed, 11:30am, 2:15, 4:45, 7:25, 10:00pm; 

Thu (8/14), 11:30am, 2:15pm 
Step Up: All In (3-D): 11:05am, 2:00, 10:50pm 
Step Up: All In (digital): 4:50, 8:05 

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (3-D): 9:50am, 11:40, 12:35, 2:25, 3:20, 5:10, 
6:05, 7:55, 10:40pm 

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (digital): 10:45am, 1:30, 4:10, 7:00, 
8:50,9:45pm 

22 Jump Street (digital): 10:50am, 1:40,4:30,7:20, 10:10pm 

X-Men: Days of Future Past (3-D): 1:25, 8:10 
X-Men: Days of Future Past (digital): 3:10, 9:50 


VIOLET CROWN CINEMA 434 \N. Second, 512/495-9600. 
Four-hour parking validation in attached garage with ticket purchase. 
Reserved seating; bar and cafe on-site. 

♦Boyhood; Fri-Sat, 11:00am, noon, 1:00,3:15,4:15,6:30,7:30,9:30, 
10:10pm; Sun-Thu (8/14), 11:00am, noon, 2:15, 3:15, 5:30, 6:30, 
8:45,9:45pm 

Magic in the Moonlight: Fri-Sat, 10:50am, 1:35, 3:40, 5:50, 8:00, 10:40pm; 
Sun-Thu (8/14), 11:20am, 1:30, 3:40, 5:50, 8:00, 10:10pm 
*A Most Wanted Man: Fri-Sat, 11:10am, 2:10, 4:35, 7:00, 9:45pm; 

Sun-Thu (8/14), 11:30am, 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30pm 


WESTGATE 11 S. Lamar & Ben White, 512/899-271 7. 

Discounts daily before 6pm. Cost for 3-D shows is regular 
ticket price plus a $3.50 premium. 

And So It Goes: Fri-Sat, 12:30, 2:50, 5:10, 7:30, 9:50; Sun, 12:30, 2:55, 5:10, 
7:30, 9:50; Mon-Tue, 12:30, 2:50, 5:10, 7:30, 9:50 
*Dawn of the Planet of the Apes (CC/DVS): 1:10,4:15, 7:15, 10:10 
Get on Up (CC/DVS): Fri-Sun, 10:10am, 12:45, 3:45, 7:00, 10:00pm; 
Mon-Wed, 12:45,3:45, 7:00, 10:00; Thu (8/14), 12:45,3:45 
*Guardians of the Galaxy {3-D, CC/DVS): 11:00am, 1:50, 4:35, 7:25, 10:10pm 
*Guardians of the Galaxy (CC/DVS): Fri-Sun, 10:00am, 11:30, 2:15, 5:00, 
7:45, 10:35pm; Mon-Wed, 11:30am, 2:15, 5:00, 7:45, 10:35pm; 

Thu (8/14), 11:30am, 2:15, 5:00pm 

*How to Train Your Dragon 2 (CC): Fri-Sat, 12:50, 3:10, 5:30; Sun, 12:50, 
3:10, 5:40; Mon-Tue, 12:50, 3:10, 5:30, 8:00, 10:30 
The Hundred-Foot Journey (CC/DVS): Fri-Sun, 10:00am, 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 
10:00pm; Mon-Thu (8/14), 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:00 
Into the Storm (CC/DVS): Fri-Sun, 10:00am, 12:30, 3:00, 5:30, 8:00, 
10:30pm; Mon-Tue, 12:30, 3:00, 5:30, 8:00, 10:30; Wed, 12:30, 3:00, 5:30, 
8:00, 10:20; Thu (8/14), noon, 2:20, 4:40, 8:00, 10:20 
Let's Be Cops (CC/DVS): Tue, 10:00pm; Wed-Thu (8/14), 11:50am, 2:30, 
5:10,7:50,10:30pm 

Lucy (CC/DVS): Fri-Sun, 10:00am, 1:00,3:20,5:45,8:00, 10:20pm; 

Mon-Thu (8/14), 1:00, 3:20, 5:45, 8:00, 10:20 

Step Up: All In (CC/DVS): 11:15am, 10:30pm 

♦Step Up: All In (3-D, CC/DVS): Fri, 2:00, 4:50, 7:50; Sat-Thu (8/14), 2:00, 
4:50, 7:45 

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles {CC/DVS): Fri-Sun, 10:00am, 2:30, 7:30pm; 
Mon-Tue, 2:30, 7:30 

*Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (3-D, CC/DVS): Fri-Sat, 10:20am, noon, 5:00, 
8:00, 10:00, 10:30pm; Sun, 10:20am, noon, 5:10, 8:00, 10:00, 10:30pm; 
Mon, noon, 5:00, 10:00; Tue, noon, 5:00 


Check Film Listings online or on your 
mobile device for full-length reviews, 
up-to-date showtimes, archives, and more! 


austinchronide.com/fnm | 


Lost Highway 


D; David Lynch; with Biii Puiiman, Patricia 
Arquette, Robert Biake, Henry Roiiins, Baithazar 
Getty, Gary Busey, Robert Loggia, Richard Pryor. 
(1997, R, 134 min.) The Complete David 
Lynch. Enigmatic even by Lynchian standards, 
Lost Highway is a hallucinatory orgy of visual 
and aural elements and clues that continue 
to beguile. (*) (©Alamo Ritz, Monday, 3:45pm; 
Wednesday, 7pm. 



O THE FAULT IN OUR STARS 

D: Josh Boone; with Shailene Woodley, Ansel Elgort, Laura Bern, 

Sam Trammell, Nat Wolff, Willem Dafoe. (PG-13, 125 min.) 

Yes, teenagers are prone to hyperbole, but when 
16-year-old Hazel (Woodley) warns “I’m a grenade,” 
she’s not far off the mark. Diagnosed with Stage IV 
cancer in her early teens, she worries about her par- 
ents (Dern and Trammell), who will inevitably survive 
her, wearing the burden as heavily as the oxygen tank 
she must lug with her everywhere. Gus (Elgort), a 
cancer survivor and self-described 18-year-old virgin 
with only one leg, is more foolhardy, or maybe just 
seize-the-day sensible, doggedly ignoring Hazel’s 
efforts to keep a safe distance. That they will fall in 
love is foregone, even for those who hadn’t already 
gulped John Green’s gorgeous source novel. After 
a slow, sweet build to an adventure in Amsterdam, 
the film dramatically plateaus, but not ruinously so. 

If you’re looking for anthemic, The Fauit in Our Stars 
falls short. But the film is bundled in kindness, and 
that’s nothing to shrug at. (06/06/2014) 

- Kimberley Jones 

Movies 8, Metropolitan, Lake Creek 7 

THE FLUFFY MOVIE 

D: Manny Rodriguez, Jay Lavender. (PG-13, 101 min.) 

Consistently funny, but workmanlike and rarely 
dazzling. The Fluffy Movie is mostly a comedy per- 
formance film - a record of Gabriel Iglesias’ current 
stand-up material. Not designed to be his defini- 
tive comic work - although the film has a narrative 
introduction in flashback that shows the meeting of 
Iglesias’ parents, as well as his birth and childhood, 
including one scene in which a very young Iglesias 
fools his mom into renting him Eddie Murphy’s Raw. 
Inherently funny, with a terrific sense of timing, an 
amazing gift for mimicry, and an ability to perfectly 
imitate all kinds of everyday sounds, Iglesias is 
always charming and frequently laugh-out-loud funny. 
An extended bit toward the end of the set - about 
finally encountering his own absentee father after 
more than 30 years of separation - gains some trac- 
tion, transcending the routine-but-still-funny, standard 
stand-up fare delivered during the rest of the set. 
Iglesias’ fans will love it. (08/01/2014) 
iriri - Louis Black 

Tinseltown South 

GET ON UP 

D: Tate Taylor; with Chadwick Boseman, Nelsan Ellis, Dan Aykroyd, 
Viola Davis, Octavia Spencer, Craig Robinson, Lennie James, Jill Scott, 
Josh Hopkins, Fred Melamed, Tika Sumpter, Allison Janney, John 
Benjamin Hickey, Jamarion Scott, Jordan Scott. (PG-13, 138 min.) 

The Godfather of Soul receives the traditional biopic 
treatment in Tate Taylor’s Get on Up, which works best 
when occupying the same swaggering, flamboyant 
wavelength as its subject - as in one scene which 
finds a flustered James Brown (Boseman) trying to 
explain to an achingly Caucasian female reporter what, 
exactly, “the groove” is. We’re treated to the usual 
highs and lows, exploring Brown’s impoverished child- 
hood in Georgia - abandoned by his mother (Davis) 
and abused by his father (James) - through a teen- 
age jail sentence, to the successful career rise and 
ensuing egomania. “You look backward, you’re dead,” 
Brown warns early on, and sure enough, whenever it 


seems that he’s getting something resembling the 
warts-and-all treatment (the film isn’t exactly shy about 
Brown’s abuse of drugs and wives). Get on Up practi- 
cally induces whiplash trying to forgive Brown’s flaws, 
and, in doing so, threatens to lose its flicker of life. 
(08/01/2014) 

- William Goss 

Alamo Lakeline, Barton Creek Square, CM Cedar Park, 
Hill Country Galleria, CM Round Rock, Southpark 
Meadows, CM Stone Hill Town Center, Flix Brewhouse, 
Highland, Gateway, iPic, Metropolitan, Moviehouse, 
Tinseltown North, Westgate 

O GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY 

D: James Gunn; with Chris Pratt, Zoe Saldana, Dave Bautista, Lee 
Pace, Karen Gillan, Michael Rooker, Djimon Hounsou, John C. Reilly, 
Benicio Del Toro, Glenn Close, Sean Gunn, Peter Serafinowicz; with 
the voices of Vin Diesel, Bradley Cooper. (PG-13, 120 min.) 

Memorable plots - or heck, even coherent ones 
- have never been a priority of the Marvel Cinematic 
Universe, and this newest film is no different: It’s 
literally about chasing a ball (sorry - make that “infin- 
ity stone”) around the galaxy. It’s so rudimentary, 
it’s genius. Once wisecracking space outlaw Peter 
“Starlord” Quill (Pratt) takes possession of the stone 
and an ad-hoc gang comes together - there’s Gamora 
(Saldana), a green-skinned professional assassin; 
the vengeful Drax the Destroyer (Bautista); Rocket 
Raccoon, a mutant mercenary (voiced by Cooper); 
and Groot, a sweet-tempered, sentient tree (voiced by 
Diesel) - the film clicks into place. As directed by cult 
favorite James Gunn (Slither), Guardians of the Galaxy 
is an outlier: a bopping, candy-colored space opera 
in a largely muted, earthbound Marvel movie cycle. 
You can keep your Avengers’ supergroup: I prefer the 
Guardians’ garage band - rowdy and rough-edged and 
a real family. (08/01/2014) 

- Kimberley Jones 
Alamo Ritz, Alamo Lakeline, Alamo Slaughter Lane, Alamo 
Village, Barton Creek Square, CM Cedar Park, Hill Country 
Galleria, CM Round Rock, Southpark Meadows, CM Stone 
Hill Town Center, Flix Brewhouse, Highland, Gateway, iPic, 
Lakeline, Metropolitan, Tinseltown North, Westgate 


VIOLET CROWN 


Now Playing 

■ ■ 

MAGIC IN THE MOONLIGHT 

“A master stroke of enchantment 
from one of the few legitimate 
cinematic geniuses of the 
modern cinema, with a nimble 
and tender performance of 
enormous elegance and charm by 
Colin Firth.” 

NEW YORK OBSERVER 


A MOST WANTED MAN BOYHOOD 


Coming Soon 

CALVARY 

“A reverie, a swirl of emotions 
and ideas, managing to be both 
calmly reflective and skittishly 
anxious at the same time.” 

LOS ANGELES TIMES 


VioletCrownCinema.com 

434 W. 2nd Street | 512-495-9600 



SPOTLIGHT EVENTS 

COMING SOON TO AN ALAMO NEAR YOU 



[Deschutes Beer Dinner: 

STAND BY ME 

Wed, Aug 13 @ Lakeline 
Celebrate this modern classic with 
delicious gourmet food paired with 
amazing croft brewed ales straight 
from Deschutes, Oregon's most 
notorious brewery. 



Shark Week: 

BLUE WATER, 

WHITE DEATH 

Sun, Aug 1 0 @ Ritz 
Three years before JAWS, on intrepid 
crew of filmmakers sailed from South 
Africa to South Australia in search of 
the great white shark. 



Weird Wednesday: 

SUMMER CAMP 
NIGHTMARE 

Wed, Aug 1 3 @ Ritz 
Summer comp! A time for swimming, 
campfires, outdoor sports, food fights, 
camaraderie, pranks, summer lovin', 
...and armed revolution! 



Terror Tuesday: 

THE BOOGEYMAN 

Tue, Aug 12 @ Ritz 
Think AMITYVILLE HORROR meets 
HALLOWEEN os directed by Lucio 
Fulci's third cousin who never 
graduated high school. 



Action Pock: 

PEE WEE'S BIG 

ADVENTURE 

QUOTE-ALONG 

Mon, Aug 11, 13 @ Ritz 
"It's not for sole, Fron-cis!" 



AGFA!: 

CINEMAPOCALYPSE 

Sat, Aug 9 @ Ritz 

For the first time in recorded history, five 
of the world's bravest film programming 
professionals will gather together for 
one night only to unleash some white- 
hot exploitation thunder 



The Influences of David Lynch: j 

LOLITA 

Mon, Aug 1 1 @ Ritz 
A brilliant and sly adaptation of 
Vladimir Nabokov's celebrated yet 
controversial novel of o middle-aged 
man's doomed sexual obsession for a 
precocious, seductive "nymphet" girl. 


Also SCREENING 


New Releases: Hundred-Foot Journey, Into the Storm, Teenage 
Mutant Ninja Turtles • Action Pock: Boy Band Sing-Along (8/7) 

• Master Pancake VS Jaws (8/8-9) • Action Pack: Ultimate '90s 
Parly (8/8) • Rear Window (8/9) • Action Pock: Totally '80s Sing- 
Along Donee Party (8/9) • The Rocky Horror Picture Show (8/9) 

• The Milky Way: Every Mother Has o Story (8/9) • Bangarongl: 
Sneakers (8/10) • Action Pack: Wet Hot American Summer 

■■ Quote-Along (8/1 1-1 2) • Lost Highway (8/1 1 , 1 3) • Tough Guy 
Cinema: The Warriors (8/12) • Action Pock: Sound & Cinema: 
Raiders of the Lost Ark with the Golden Dawn Arkestra (8/13) • 
Girlie Night: Steel Magnolias (8/1 3) 


BEST THEATER IN AUSTIN! 


. TlX & MORE: DRAFTHOUSE.COM 
. ALL SHOWS 1 8 & UP / NO INFANTS 
. HOST YOUR NEXT PRIVATE EVENT 
. CALL VENUE RENTAL @ 512-861-7084 


austinchronicle.com AUGUST 8, 2014 the Austin chronicle 63 







FILM LISTINGS 


Summer With Monika 


D; Ingmar Bergman; with Harriet Andersson, Lars 
Ekborg. (1953, R, 96 min.) CineMondays: How 
I Spent My Summer Vacation. Bergman’s early 
film is a stark story of young love grown apart 
as romantic runaways gradually evolve into 
an unhappily married couple. @Spider House 
Ballroom, Monday, 8:30pm. 



HERCULES 

D: Brett Ratner; with Dwayne Johnson, Rufus Sewell, John Hurt, Ian 
McShane, Peter Mullan, Reece Ritchie, Ingrid Bols0 Berdal, Rebecca 
Ferguson, Aksel Hennie, Joseph Fiennes, Joe Anderson, Tobias 
Santelmann. (PG-13, 98 min.) 

With Hercu/es, journeyman director (at best) Brett 
Ratner sets his sights on the historical epic, deliver- 
ing a big-budget adventure in which the much-herald- 
ed Hercules (Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson) is not a 
lone demigod, but a gold-seeking mercenary eagerly 
leading his team of archetypal sidekicks - the surly 
comrade (Sewell), the young hype-man (Ritchie), the 
tomboy archer (Berdal), the mute madman (Hennie), 
and the sarcastic seer (McShane) - into combat. 

That notion of mythic deconstruction is the single 
most intriguing element of this comic-based Hercules, 
but the “print the legend” angle is soon abandoned 
in favor of traditional derring-do, constant quips, and 
exotic locales, as Hercules and friends are enlisted 
by Lord Cotys (Hurt) to track down the rogue Rhesus 
(Santelmann). To that end, Ratner has fashioned an 
adequate sword-and-sandal actioner around Johnson, 
whose natural charisma might Just be strong enough 
to elevate this vehicle above the level of marginal 
matinee fare. (08/01/2014) 

★★★ - William Goss 

Barton Creek Square, CM Cedar Park, Hill Country 
Galleria, CM Round Rock, Southpark Meadows, CM 
Stone Hill Town Center, Highland, Gateway, iPic, 
Metropolitan, Moviehouse, Tinseltown North 

©LUCY 

D: Luc Besson; with Scarlett Johansson, Morgan Freeman, 

Choi Min-sik, Amr Waked. (R, 88 min.) 

Luc Besson’s best films - taut, cinematically 
explosive, skillfully plotted, fantastic narratives - are 
among my all-time favorites. But when was his last 
great film as a director: The Fifth Element in 1997? 
Lucy is a glorious mess, a film that casually wanders 
through a variety of genres. Which is fine, if only 
because it is so deliriously anchored by Scarlett 
Johansson’s performance. Set up by her boyfriend. 


Raiders of the Lost Ark 


D; Steven Spielberg; with Harrison Ford. (1981, 
PG, 115 min.) Sound & Cinema. John Williams’ 
score is sure to sound lively as the Golden 
Dawn Arkestra perform before the screening. 
(*) @Long Center for the Performing Arts, 
Wednesday, 7:30pm. 



64 THEAUSTIN CHRONICLE AUGUST8,2014 


Lucy (Johansson) becomes an unwilling drug mule 
when a dangerous Asian cartel surgically inserts a 
stash of a new, secret superdrug into her body. But 
the packets of drugs soon burst, and almost immedi- 
ately Lucy begins to evolve into a human being who 
can exercise 100% of her intelligence. Far-fetched but 
riveting, and a daring, giddy Joy ride of an adventure, 
Lucy races along, leaving behind a swirlingly confused 
trail as it tracks a single intelligence that’s rapidly 
evolving from human to universal. (07/25/2014) 

- Louis Black 

Alamo Lakeline, Alamo Slaughter Lane, Alamo Village, 
Barton Creek Square, CM Cedar Park, Hill Country 
Galleria, CM Round Rock, Southpark Meadows, CM 
Stone Hill Town Center, Flix Brewhouse, Highland, 
Gateway, iPic, Lakeline, Moviehouse, Tinseltown North, 
Tinseltown South, Westgate 

O A MOST WANTED MAN 

D: Anton Corbijn; with Philip Seymour Hoffman, Rachel McAdams, 
Grigoriy Dobrygin, Robin Wright, Willem Dafoe, Daniel Bruhl, 
Homayoun Ershadi, Nina Hoss, Franz Hartwig. (R, 121 min.) 

A post-9/11 espionage thriller adapted from John 
Le Carre’s 2008 novel, A Most Wanted Man opens 
in Hamburg, Germany, a port city on high alert after 
Mohamed Atta and his co-conspirators plotted the 
September 11th attacks there. In the film’s first 
minutes, a Chechen/Russian dual citizen named 
Issa (Dobrygin) is absorbed into Hamburg’s Muslim 
community, setting off alarms for an off-the-books 
team of spies, led by Gunther Bachmann (Hoffman, 
in one of his last performances). Issa is the central 
daub of paint in a pointillist portrait of predators 
and prey: Take 10 steps back, cock your head to the 
left, and maaaaaaybe all the discrete strokes make 
sense in wide focus. Be they spies, bureaucrats, 
or Islamic extremists, everybody has a place in the 
pecking order, but director Anton Corbijn {Control, The 
American), playing it close to the chest, intentionally 
obscures precisely who’s predator and who’s prey. 
Forget it: Everybody’s chum here. (07/25/2014) 

- Kimberley Jones 

Arbor, Barton Creek Square, Hill Country Galleria, 
Tinseltown North, Violet Crown 

PLANES: FIRE & RESCUE 

D: Bobs Gannaway; with the voices of Dane Cook, Ed Harris, Julie 
Bowen, Curtis Armstrong, John Michael Higgins, Hal Holbrook, 

Wes Studi, Brad Garrett, Teri Hatcher, Stacy Keach, Cedric the 
Entertainer, Danny Mann, Barry Corbin, Regina King, Anne Meara, 
Jerry Stiller, Fred Willard. (PG, 84 min.) 

The Walt Disney crew is beyond expert at turning 
out these clever, funny, appealing, 3-D, animated 
films. This sequel to last year’s moderate hit Planes 
finds the race-winning plane Dusty learning that his 
gearbox is permanently damaged and irreplaceable. 
No longer able to race. Dusty Joins a fire-and-rescue 
team, where he must learn to work in a group and be 
less of a showboat. Often breathtakingly beautiful, 
as well as wittily written to entertain both children 
and adults. Planes: Fire & Rescue still falls flat. The 
astonishing feats of aerial maneuvering and sumptu- 
ously rich depictions of burning forests can be visu- 
ally pleasurable and cinematically impressive, but 
Planes: Fire & Rescue is Just too mundane, its narra- 
tive never able to expand beyond the art. Obviously, 
an enormous amount of effort was invested in this 
project. Unfortunately, those good intentions resulted 
in the creation of a largely unimaginative, if still mildly 
entertaining, work. (07/18/2014) 

★★ - Louis Black 

Alamo Slaughter Lane, Barton Creek Square, CM Cedar 
Park, Hill Country Galleria, CM Round Rock, Southpark 
Meadows, CM Stone Hill Town Center, Gateway, 
Tinseltown North, Tinseltown South 

O THE PURGE: ANARCHY 

D: James DeMonaco; with Frank Grille, Carmen EJogo, Zoe Soul, 

Zach Gilford, Kiele Sanchez, Michael K. Williams, Edwin Hodge, Keith 
Stanfield. (R, 104 min.) 

The inevitable sequel to last summer’s The Purge, 
which struck an unlikely chord with its outlandish 
yet provocative premise - supposing a near-future 
in which social order is maintained by way of an 
annual lawless free-for-all - The Purge: Anarchy wisely 
broadens its focus to several sets of characters on 
the streets of Los Angeles. There’s Shane (Gilford) 
and Liz (Sanchez), two dumb kids stranded by car 
trouble; Eva (EJogo) and Cali (Soul), a mother and 
daughter whose plans to hunker down prove futile; 
and Sergeant (Grille), a Punisher-like vigilante whose 
conscience ultimately gets the better of him. They 

austinchronicle.com 


On the Waterfront 


D; Elia Kazan; with Marlon Brando, Karl Malden, 
Lee J. Cobb, Rod Steiger, Eva Marie Saint. (1954, 
NR, 108 min.) Summer Film Classics: Fifties 
Brando. This one’s still a contender in anyone’s 
book. Screenwriter Budd Schulberg’s expose 
of the corruption in the dock workers’ unions 
won eight Oscars and remains as stirring as 
ever - as does Brando. (Double bill: A Streetcar 
Named Desire) (©Paramount, Tuesday, 9:25pm; 
Wednesday, 7pm. 



reluctantly team up with one another in order to 
make it through the night. Returning writer/director 
DeMonaco brings a welcome sense of momentum 
to the film, which doubles as its own best metaphor 
by inviting audiences to cheer on its annual dose 
of bloodshed as much as question its moral value. 
(07/18/2014) 

- William Goss 

Southpark Meadows, Metropolitan, Tinseltown North 

SEX TAPE 

D: Jake Kasdan; with Cameron Diaz, Jason Segel, Rob Corddry, Ellie 
Kemper, Rob Lowe, Nat Faxon. (R, 94 min.) 

Annie (Diaz) and Jay (Segel) are a married couple 
trying to rekindle the spark of romantic love in the 
bluntly titled Sex Tape. One drunken evening, they 
decide to make an epic, three-hour document of their 
carnal knowledge on Jay’s iPad. No big deal, right? 

Not so fast! When Jay accidentally uploads the video 
to his “cloud,” everyone - all of their friends and 
family, as well as Annie’s potential new boss (Lowe), 
and even the mailman - has the sex tape. When it 
becomes apparent, through sinister anonymous texts, 
that the footage is being used as blackmail, an all- 
night odyssey of bumbling retrieval ensues. Sex Tape 
goes to great pains to establish its intention, but the 
film fails in the two main tenets it should be traffick- 
ing in: being funny and being raunchy. It’s a bland, 
clawless comedy; a cautionary tale of a high concept 
gone horribly, horribly wrong. (07/25/2014) 

★ - Josh Kupecki 

iPic, Tinseltown South 

OSNOWPIERCER 

D: Bong Joon-ho; with Chris Evans, Song Kang-ho, Tilda Swinton, 

Ko Ah-sung, Jamie Bell, John Hurt, Octavia Spencer, Ewen Bremner, 
Alison Pill, Vlad Ivanov, Ed Harris. (R, 126 min.) 

An object of blunt force and breath-catching 
beauty, Snowpiercer plays what-if with a familiar 
doomsday scenario: What if Noah’s ark never found 
dry land again? In this English-language debut from 
acclaimed South Korean filmmaker Bong Joon-ho 


THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 2 Movies 8 
BLENDED iri Movies 8 

O CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER 

★★★ Movies 8, Lake Creek 7 

O CHEF Arbor, Metropolitan 

DELIVER US FROM EVIL ^ Tinseltown South 
GODZILLA ★★★ Movies 8, Lake Creek 7 

O HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON 2 

Westgate 


{The Host, Mother), set in 2031 - some 17 years 
after a failed experiment to counteract global warm- 
ing initiated a catastrophic Ice Age - humanity is 
now extinct, save the few thousand souls aboard 
the titular train, a fixed ecosystem powered by a 
perpetual-motion engine, which crosses the world 
on a continuous track. Primed for rebellion, the put- 
upon steerage class rallies around a reluctant leader 
named Curtis (Evans), in hopes of seizing the engine 
from the train’s designer and godhead, Wilford. 
Single-purposed, but decidedly not single-minded, 
Snowpiercer is an unruly but rattling - and ravishing - 
work of art. (06/27/2014) 

★★★★ - Kimberley Jones 

Alamo Lakeline 

TRANSFORMERS: 

AGE OF EXTINCTION 

D: Michael Bay; with Mark Wahiherg, Stanley Tucci, Kelsey 
Grammer, Nicola Peltz, Jack Reynor, Titus Welliver, Binghing Li, T.J. 
Miller, Sophia Myles, Peter Cullen, Frank Welker, Mark Ryan, John 
Goodman, Ken Watanahe. (PG-13, 165 min.) 

“You can’t keep spending money on Junk to 
make new Junk!” tanned teen Tessa (Peltz) pleads. 
Clearly, she doesn’t realize she’s in Michael Bay’s 
Transformers: Age of Extinction, his fourth and longest 
yet effort to sell shiny, shape-shifting toys to little 
kids and flashy cars to big ones. Taking place five 
years after the Battle of Chicago, Age does away 
with screaming Shia LaBeouf and his dopey parents, 
focusing instead on struggling small-town inventor 
Cade Yeager (Wahiberg), who has unwittingly revived 
Autobot leader Optimus Prime. Harboring this oth- 
erworldly fugitive puts Cade, Tessa, and secret boy- 
friend Shane (Reynor) right in the thick of danger - 
especially with CIA stooge Harold Attinger (Grammar) 
working in league with intergalactic bounty hunter 
Lockdown and biotech giant Joshua Joyce (Tucci) 
to eliminate all Autobots and Decepticons alike. So 
long as Bay keeps throwing this Junk in our faces, 
people will keep throwing their money right back. 
(07/04/2014) 

- William Goss 

Lakeline, Metropolitan, Millennium, Tinseltown North 

WISH I WAS HERE 

D: Zach Braff; with Zach Braff, Kate Hudson, Mandy Patinkin, Josh 
Gad, Joey King, Pierce Gagnon, Jim Parsons, Ashley Greene, Michael 
Weston. (R, 106 min.) 

A decade’s gone by now since Garden State - 
Braff’s of-the-moment picture of generational anomie 
and mid-Aughties, mass-appeal indie film mores 
- and things change. Has Zach Braff? Much as his 
directorial debut took the temperature of a certain 
kind of twentysomething circa 2004, Wish I Was Here 
clearly wants to impart something Just as thumping 
about what late-30s life is like, troubled by unruly 
kids, ailing parents, and creative aspirations compli- 
cated by financial realities. Braff has an ever-clever 
eye for observational humor, but too often the film 
feels reverse-engineered to manufacture would-be 
iconic imagery. Wish I Was Here has its moments of 
transcendence: The young actress Joey King, who 
plays Braff’s daughter, and Mandy Patinkin, as his 
cancer-riddled. Orthodox Jewish dad, are particularly 
touching in their sincere wrangling with spirituality. 
Still, everything else in this everything-and-the-kitchen- 
sink film feels like too many ideas stored up over an 
especially long winter. (07/25/2014) 

★★ - Kimberley Jones 

Arbor, Barton Creek Square 


O MALEFICENT ★★★ Lakeline, Tinseltown South 

O MILLION DOLLAR ARM iririri Lake Creek 7 

A MILLION WAYS TO DIE IN THE WEST 

★★★ Lake Creek 7 

MOM'S NIGHT OUT Lake Creek 7 

RIO 2 iri Movies 8, Lake Creek 7 
22 JUMP STREET Tinseltown South 

O X-MEN: DAYS OF FUTURE PAST 

★★★ Movies 8, Lake Creek 7, Tinseltown South 


also playing 


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THE BAD AND THE BEAUTIFUL 

THU (8/7) 7:00 

ALL ABOUT EVE 

THU (8/7) 9:20 

THE GREAT DICTATOR 

SAT (8/9) 2:00 & 6:05; SUN (8/10) 3:45 

MODERN TIMES 

SAT (8/9) 4:25; SUN (8/1 0) 2:00 & 6:05 

A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE 

TUE (8/12) 7:00; WED (8/13) 9:10 

ON THE WATERFRONT 

TUE (8/12) 9:25; WED (8/13) 7:00 

PSYCHO 

THU (8/14) 7:00; FRI (8/15) 9:30 

VERTIGO 

THU (8/14) 9:10; FRI (8/15) 7:00 

NORTH BY NORTHWEST 

SAT (8/1 6) 2:00 & 6:50; SUN (8/1 7) 4:20 

THE BIRDS 

SAT (8/ier4:35; SUn\8/17) 2.T10 & 6:50 

DIABOLIQUE 

MON (8/18) 7:00; TUE (8/19) 9:00 

STRANGERS ON A TRAIN 

MON (8/18) 9:15; TUE (8/19) 7:00 

TOKYO STORY 

WED (8/20) 7:00; THU (8/21) 9:35 

IKIRU 

WED (8/20) 9:30; THU (8/21) 7:00 

BELU BOOK AND CANDLE 

SAT (8/23) 4:00; SUN (8/24)4:15 

AN AMERICAN IN PARIS 

SAT (8/23) 6:00; SUN (8/24) 2:00 

irSAMAD, MAD, MAD, MAD WORLD 

TUE (8/26) 7:00; WED (8/27) 7:00 

SPARTACUS 

THU (8/28) 7:00; FRI (8/29) 7:00 

INDIANA JONES AND THE LAST CRUSADE 

SAT (8/30) 4:30 & 7:1 5; SUN 2:00 

ALL THAT HEAVEN ALLOWS 

WED (9/3) 7:00; THU (9/4) 8:50 

THE NIGHT OF THE HUNTER 

WED (9/3) 8:50; THU (9/4) 7:00 

GIANT 

SAT (9/6) 7:00; SUN (9/7) 2:00 & 6:00 

GONE WITH THE WIND 

MON (12/15)7:00 


REBECCA 

TUE (8/12) 7:15; WED (8/13) 9:15 

NOTORIOUS 

TUE (8/12) 9:45; WED (8/13) 7:15 

ROPE 

THU (8/14) 7:15; FRI (8/15) 9:15 

THE TROUBLE WITH HARRY 

THU (8/14) 8:55; FRI (8/15) 7:15 

FRENZY 

SAT (8/1 6) 2:1 5; SUN (8/1 7) 4:35 

FAMILY PLOT 

SAT (8/1 6) 4:30; SUN (8/17) 2:15 

INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS 

TUE (8/19) 7:15; WED (8/20) 9:15 

FORBIDDEN PLANET 

TUE (8/19) 8:55; WED (8/20) 7:15 

HIGH NOON 

THU (8/21) 7:15; FRI (8/22) 9:55 


austinchronicle.com AUGUST 8, 2014 the Austin chronicle 65 








AUGUST 7-14 


BY MARJORIE BAUMGARTEN AND JOSH KUPECKI 


THURSDAY 7 

All About Eve (1950) D; Joseph L Mankiewicz; 
with Bette Davis, Anne Baxter, George Sanders, 
Ceieste Hoim, Gary Merriii, Mariiyn Monroe, Barbara 
Bates. (R, 138 min.) Summer Film Classics. With 
a stunning 14 Oscar nominations for the cast and 
crew, this show-biz classic is as wicked and sophis- 
ticated as they come. (Double bill: The Bad and the 
Beautifui.) (*) (©Paramount, 9:20pm. 

O The Bad and the Beautiful (1952) D. 

Vincente Minneiii; with Kirk Dougias, Lana Turner, 
Waiter Pidgeon. (NR, 118 min.) Summer Film 
Classics. The underbelly of Hollywood is exposed 
as a film producer unscrupulously does whatever he 
can to attain success. (Double bill: Aii About Eve.) 
(©Paramount, 7pm. 

Boy Band Sing-Along Action Pack. 

(©Alamo Ritz, 10pm. 

The Lady Eve (1941) D; Preston Sturges; with 
Barbara Stanwyck, Henry Fonda, Charies Coburn, 
Wiiiiam Demarest. (NR, 94 min.) AFS Essential 
Cinema: Stanwyck in her Prime. Preston Sturges’ 
delirious humor sets up Henry Fonda’s wealthy dope 
to be taken by Barbara Stanwyck’s seductive con- 
artistry. (*) (©Marchesa Hall & Theatre, 7:30pm. 

Monty Python Live (Mostly) (2014) D. Eric Idie. 
(NR, 180 min.) Out of Bounds Comedy Festival 
Presents. The remaining Pythons perform their 
greatest hits. Sunday’s screening is live from 
London, with encore screenings on Wednesday and 
Thursday. (©Alamo Lakeline, 7pm; Alamo Slaughter 
Lane, 7:15pm. 

O Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me (1992) 

D; David Lynch. (R, 135 min.) The Complete David 
Lynch. Lynch alienated more than a few fans with 
this savage prequel (and epilogue) that brings Laura 
Palmer’s sordid, tragic life and mysterious death 
from TV to the screen. (*) (©Alamo Ritz, 3:30pm. 

KIDS 

An American Tail (©Alamo Village, 11am. 

Babe Free. (*) (©Alamo Slaughter Lane, 9:40, 10:05. 

Despicable Me (*) (©Lake Creek 7, 10am. 

Rango Free. (*) (©Alamo Lakeline, 9:50am. 

Rio 2 (*) (©CM Cedar Park, Movies 8, 10am. 


FRIDAY 8 

A Bucket of Blood (1959) D; Roger German. (NR, 

66 min.) AFS: The Films of Roger Corman. This 
tongue-in-cheek horror film takes place among the 
beatnik coffehouses of Venice Beach. For more on 
Corman, see “Fast, Cheap, and in Control,” p.41. 
(©Marchesa Hall & Theatre, 10pm. 

Jaws (1975) D; Steven Spieiberg; with Roy Scheider, 
Robert Shaw, Richard Dreyfuss. (PG, 124 min.) 
Master Pancake. The Pancake crew are going to 
need a bigger boat as they mock this summer clas- 
sic. (*) (©Alamo Ritz, 7, 10. 

O That Guy Dick Miller (2014) D; Eiijah Drenner. 

(NR, 91 min.) AFS: The Films of Roger Corman. 

Beloved character actor and frequent Corman col- 
laborator is profiled in this doc. Skype interview with 
Miller after the film. For more on Corman, see “Fast, 
Cheap, and in Control,” p.41. (©Marchesa Hall & 
Theatre, 7:30pm. 

Totally Eighties Sing-Aiong Dance Party 

Action Pack. (©Alamo Village, 10:40pm. 

Uitimate Nineties Party Action Pack. 

(©Alamo Slaughter Lane, 10:30pm. 


SUBMISSION INFORMATION: 

The Austin Chronicie is published every Thursday. 

Info is due the Monday of the week prior to the issue date. 
The deadline for the Aug. 22 issue is Monday, Aug. 11. 

Include name of event, date, time, location, price, phone 
number(s), a description, and any available photos or 
artwork. 

Send submissions to the Chronicie, PO Box 49066, 
Austin, TX 78765; fax, 512/458-6910; or email. 

Contact Josh Kupecki (Special Screenings): 

specialscreenings@austinchronicle.com; 

Wayne Alan Brenner (Offscreen): 

calendar@austinchronicle.com. 


66 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE AUGUSTS, 2014 


SPACES 

O The Great Outdoors (1988) D; Howard Deutch; 
with Dan Akroyd, John Candy, Annette Bening. (PG, 91 
min.) Summer Movie Nights. The meat merchants 
at Micklethwait have cooked up a delicious special 
to go along with this middling comedy: smoked rib- 
eye roast with beurre rouge, herbed gorgonzola tater 
tots, and crispy brussel sprouts. BYOB. 

(©Micklethwait Craft Meats, 1309 Rosewood, 8:30pm. 

KIDS 

An American Tail (©Alamo Slaughter Lane, 10:25am. 

Rango @Alamo Village, 10:15am. 

Tim Burton's Corpse Bride (*) (©Alamo Lakeline, 
10am. 


SATURDAY 9 

O AGFA Cinemapocalypse D; Various. Join five of 
the world’s leading film programmers (Bret Berg, Phil 
Blankenship, Cristina Cacioppo, Zack Carlson, and 
Kier-La Janisse) as they each pluck a film from the 
American Genre Film Archive to make you reevaluate 
your notions of cinema. (©Alamo Ritz, 2pm. 

O The Great Dictator (1940) D; Chariie Chapiin; 
with Chapiin, Pauiette Goddard, Jack Oakie. (NR, 

128 min.) Summer Film Classics: A Weekend With 
the Little Tramp. Chaplin plays two roles in his 
legendary satire of Adolf Hitler, which he also wrote 
and directed. Released one year before the U.S. 
entered the war, the film ridicules an enemy that 
most Americans had not yet accepted as their own. 
The film also marks Chaplin’s first speaking role. 
(Double bill: Modern Times.) @ Paramount, 2, 6:05. 

Jaws (1975) Master Pancake. (©Alamo Village, 

7, 10. (See Friday.) 

The Milky Way: Every Mother Has a Story 
(2014) D; Jon Fitzgeraid. (NR, 90 min.) Screening to 
celebrate National Breastfeeding Month, this doc is 
preceded by a proclamation from Council Member 
Laura Morrison. For more info, see www.keepaustin 
breastfeeding.org. (©Alamo Slaughter Lane, 1pm. 

Modern Times (1936) D; Chariie Chapiin; with 
Chapiin, Pauiette Goddard. (NR, 87 min.) Summer 
Fiim Classics: A Weekend With the Littie Tramp. 
Modern Times is Chaplin’s last silent film (although 
it includes clever background sounds and a music 
score by Chaplin) and also the final screen appear- 
ance of his Little Tramp character. In this 1936 film, 
Chaplin satirizes technology and the growing hold it 
has on our lives. (Double bill: The Great Dictator.) @ 
Paramount, 4:25pm. 

O Rear Window (1954) D; Aifred Hitchcock; with 
James Stewart, Grace Keiiy, Theima Ritter, Raymond 
Burr. (PG, 114 min.) The Influences of David Lynch. 
One of Hitchcock’s most accessible films is also 
one of his most gleefully deviant, dealing as it does 
with such fun urban pastimes as voyeurism and 
spousal mayhem, two subjects that would preoc- 
cupy Lynch. (*) (©Alamo Ritz, 11am. 

The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975) (R, 95 

min.) Austin fans have been dressing up and doing 
the “Time Warp” thing live for more than three 
decades. For more info, see www.austinrocky.org. 
(©Alamo Village, 12mid. 

Totally Eighties Sing-Along Dance Party Action 

Pack. (©Alamo Slaughter Lane, 10:35pm. (See Friday.) 

SPACES 

Bye Bye Birdie (1963) D; George Sidney; with 
Janet Leigh, Dick Van Dyke, Ann-Margret, Paui Lynde. 
(G, 112 min.) Flashback Family: Sixties Night at 
the LBJ. Great music and brilliant performances by 
Ann-Margret, Paul Lynde, and Dick Van Dyke. (*) 
(®LBJ Library Lawn, 9pm. 

Isa (2014) D; Jose Nestor Marquez; with Jeanette 
Samano, Ana Layevska, Eric Ochoa. (NR, 90 min.) 
Second Saturday Screening. Unique sci-fi film about 
an undocumented 17-year-old Latina who takes on a 
ruthless scientist and her billionaire boss in a battle 
over the power of dreams. (©Women’s Community 
Center, 1704 San Antonio St., 6pm. 

KIDS 

An American Tail @Alamo Slaughter Lane, 10am. 

Babe (*) (®Flix Brewhouse, 10:30am. 

Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs 2 {*) 

(©University Hills Branch Library, 2pm. 

Rango (©Alamo Village, 10:30am. 

Tim Burton's Corpse Bride (©Alamo Lakeline, 10am. 

austinchronicle.com 



SUNDAY 10 

Beverly Hills Cop (1984) D. Martin Brest; 
with Eddie Murphy, Judge Reinhoid. (R, 105 min.) 

Cinemark Summer Classics. Action-comedy vehicle 
presents Murphy at his very best. (©Tinseltown 
North, Hill Country Galleria, 2pm. 

Blue Water, White Death (1971) D. Peter Gimbei 
and James Lipscomb. (G, 99 min.) Vulcan Video 
Presents. To celebrate Shark Week, this doc focus- 
ing on great white sharks screens. (©Alamo Ritz, 
10:15pm. 

A Bucket of Blood (1959) AFS: The Films of 

Roger Corman. (©Marchesa Hall & Theatre, 2pm. 
(See Friday.) 

Dragon Bali Z: Battle of the Gods (2014) D. 

Masahiro Hosoda; with the voices of Sean Schemmei, 
Christopher R. Sabat, Laura Baiiey. (NR, 75 min.) The 
first big screen presentation of a Dragon Baii Z fea- 
ture in over a decade. (©Alamo Lakeline, 4:35pm. 

O The Great Dictator (1940) Summer Film 
Classics: A Weekend With the Little Tramp. 

(©Paramount, 3:45pm. (See Saturday.) 

Modern Times (1936) Summer Film Classics: A 
Weekend With the Little Tramp. (©Paramount, 2, 
6:05. (See Saturday.) 

Monty Python Live (Mostly) (2014) Out of 
Bounds Comedy Festival Presents. (©Alamo 
Lakeline, Alamo Village; 7pm; Alamo Slaughter 
Lane, 7:15pm (See Thursday, 8/7.) 

O Rear Window (1954) The Influences of David 
Lynch. (©Alamo Ritz, 4pm. (See Saturday.) 

Sneakers (1992) D; Phii Aiden Robinson; with 
Robert Redford, Sidney Poitier, Dan Aykroyd, David 
Strathairn, River Phoenix, Ben Kingsiey, Mary 
Mcdonneii, Timothy Busfieid, Steven Toboiowsky. 
Bangarang!. This outdated hacker comedy/thriller 
with a lot of star wattage does not hold up as well 
as you think it does. (*) (©Alamo Ritz, 7pm. 

SPACES 

Living Springs D: Karen Kocher. This final full- 
moon screening at the north entrance to the pool 
presents a program of short videos related to the 
“Culture of the Springs.” (©Barton Springs 
Pool, 9pm. 

KIDS 

An American Tail (©Alamo Slaughter Lane, 9:25am. 
Rango (©Alamo Village, 9:55am. 

Tim Burton's Corpse Bride 

(©Alamo Lakeline, 10am. 


MONDAY 11 

David Lynch Mystery Program D. David Lynch. 

The Complete David Lynch. While the lineup for this 
show is top secret, you can probably expect some 
early shorts, some of Lynch’s work in advertising, 
and maybe episodes of his short-lived TV show On 
the Air. (©Alamo Ritz, 10:35pm. 

The Giver: World Premiere Red Carpet Event 

D; Phiiiip Noyce; with Jeff Bridges, Meryi Streep, Tayior 
Swift. (PG-13, 94 min.) NCM Fathom. Interviews with 
the cast, red carpet footage, and more precede a 
sneak preview of the beloved YA novel. Bonus: free 
sunglasses! (©CM Cedar Park, Tinseltown North, 

Hill Country Galleria, Metropolitan, Southpark 
Meadows, 7pm. 

Lolita (1962) D; Staniey Kubrick; with Sue Lyon, 
Peter Seiiers, Sheiiey Winters, James Mason. (NR, 

152 min.) The Influences of David Lynch. Nabokov’s 
satire is sensationally cast, with Winters and Sellers 
delivering some of their best work ever. (*) 

@Alamo Ritz, 7pm. 

O Lost Highway (1997) See p.63. 

Monty Python and the Holy Grail 
Quote-Along Action Pack. (©Alamo Slaughter 
Lane, 10:20pm. 

Wet Hot American Summer Quote-Along 
( 2001 ) D; David Wain; with Michaei Showaiter, Paui 
Rudd, Amy Poehier. (R, 97 min.) Action Pack. Will 
talking cans of vegetables be distributed? Come 
and find out. (©Alamo Slaughter Lane, 7:15pm. 

Wet Hot American Summer (2001) D. David 
Wain; with Michaei Showaiter, Janeane Garofaio, 

David Hyde Pierce, Christopher Meioni, Paui Rudd, 
Moiiy Shannon. (R, 97 min.) Spoof of old summer- 
camp sexcapades is performed by a sprawling cast 
of comedic hams. (*) (©Alamo Lakeline, 7pm. 

SPACES 

The Patriot (2000) D; Roiand Emmerich; with 
Adam Baidwin, Donoi Logue, Lisa Brenner, Tom 
Wiikinson, Rene Auberjonois, Tcheky Karyo, Chris 
Cooper, Jason Isaacs, Joeiy Richardson, Heath Ledger, 
Me/ Gibson. (R, 164 min.) Fulmore Middle School 
Movie Series. (*) (©Cepeda Branch Library, 6pm. 

O Summer With Monika (1953) See p.64. 

KIDS 

An American Tail (©Alamo Slaughter Lane, 
10:25am. 

Mr. Peabody & Sherman (*) (©CM Cedar Park, 
Lake Creek 7, Movies 8, 10am. 

Rango (©Alamo Village, 10:45am. 

Tim Burton's Corpse Bride (©Alamo Lakeline, 
10:45am. 


OFFSCREEN 

Other Worlds Austin Film Fest Call For Entries Science fiction comes in all shapes and sizes - hor- 
ror, drama, comedy, shorts, and full-length films. Other World Austin will bring the best of all that is sci-fi to 
Austin, and they want you to submit your film! To do so, visit www.othentforldsaustin.com for form and guidlines. 
Fridays, Mondays, Saturdays, Sundays, Thursdays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays. 


The symbol (*) indicates full-length reviews available online: austinchromcle.com/film. 





TUESDAY 12 

The Boogeyman (1980) D; Ulli Lommel; with 
Suzanna Love, Ron James, John Carradine, Nicholas 
Love. (R, 82 min.) Terror Tuesday. A mirror that wit- 
nessed a murder years earlier wreaks havoc when 
smashed into shards in this film directed by horror 
master Lommel, who was also a regular Fassbinder 
actor. (*) @Alamo Ritz, 10:30pm. 

Dragon Ball Z: Battle of the Gods (2014) 

@Alamo Lakeline, 10pm. (See Sunday.) 

Notorious (1946) D; Alfred Hitchcock; with Cary 
Grant, Ingrid Bergman, Claude Rains. (NR, 101 min.) 
Summer Film Classics: Hitchcock Week. Bergman 
and Grant sizzle in this espionage tale written by 
Ben Hecht. Bergman is an undercover spy whose 
mission forces her to feign love for Nazi-sympathizer 
Rains instead of making love with her newly 
assigned partner. Grant. (Double bill: Rebecca.) (*) 
@Stateside at the Paramount, 9:45pm. 

O On the Waterfront (1954) See p.64. 

O Rear Window (1954) The Influences of David 
Lynch. @Alamo Ritz, 4:30pm. (See Saturday.) 

O Rebecca (1940) D; Alfred Hitchcock; with 
Laurence Olivier, Joan Fontaine, George Sanders, 
Judith Anderson. (NR, 130 min.) Summer Film 
Classics: Hitchcock Week. Hitchcock’s first 
American film remains one of his creepiest. This 
Daphne du Maurier story relates the plight of a new 
bride who lives in the perverse shadow of her hus- 
band’s former wife. (Double bill: Notorious.) (*) 
@Stateside at the Paramount, 7:15pm. 

A Streetcar Named Desire (1951) D. Elia 
Kazan; with Marlon Brando, Vivien Leigh, Kim Hunter, 
Karl Malden. (NR, 122 min.) Summer Film Classics: 
Fifties Brando. Brando reprised his Broadway role 
in this 1951 multi-Oscar winner. His (and playwright 
Tennessee Williams’) Stanley Kowalski has become 
a certifiable American icon. (Double bill: On the 
Waterfront.) (*) (©Paramount, 7pm. 

The Warriors (1979) D; Walter Hill; with Michael 
Beck, James Remar, Thomas Waites, Dorsey Wright. 

(R, 90 min.) Tough Guy Cinema. Hill’s visually rivet- 
ing tale about gangland warfare in New York City 
unfolds like a violent, comic-book Western. Gang 
colors, desolate streets and subway platforms, and 
graffiti-emblazoned backgrounds create penetrating 
images of boroughs gone berserk with block-by- 
block warfare. (*) (©Alamo Ritz, 7:30pm. 

Wet Hot American Summer Quote-Along 
(2001) Action Pack. (©Alamo Slaughter Lane, 
7:15pm. (See Monday.) 

SPACES 

2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) D; Stanley Kubrick, 
with Keir Dullea, Gary Lockwood. (PG, 139 min.) Austin 
Fiim Festivai. Kubrick’s film remains a peerless clas- 
sic - a complete and total film experience, magnifi- 
cent in its scope and expression, singular in its vision 
and ambition. (*) (©Texas Spirit Theater, 7pm. 

KIDS 

An American Tail (©Alamo Slaughter Lane, 10:15am. 

The Croods (*) (©Twin Oaks Branch Library, 6:30pm. 

Mr. Peabody & Sherman (©CM Cedar Park, Lake 
Creek 7, Movies 8, Tinseltown South, 10am. 

Range (©Alamo Village, 11am. 

Tim Burton^s Corpse Bride (©Alamo Lakeline, 
10:45am. 


WEDNESDAY 13 

Beverly Hills Cop (1984) Cinemark Summer 

Classics. (©Tinseltown North, Hill Country Galleria, 

2, 7. (See Sunday.) 

O Lost Highway (1997) See p.63. 

Notorious (1946) Summer Film Classics: 
Hitchcock Week. (©Stateside at the Paramount, 
7:15pm. (See Tuesday.) 

O On the Waterfront (1954) See p.64. 

Pee-wee's Big Adventure Quote-Along (1985) 

D; Tim Burton; with Paul Reubens. (PG, 90 min.) 
Action Pack. (©Alamo Village, 7pm. 

O Rebecca (1940) Summer Film Classics: 
Hitchcock Week. (©Stateside at the Paramount, 
9:15pm. (See Tuesday.) 

Sin City (2005) D: Robert Rodriguez, Frank Miller, 
and Quentin Tarantino; with Mickey Rourke, Bruce 
Willis, Clive Owen, Jessica Alba, Rosario Dawson, 
Jaime King, Benicio Del Toro, Elijah Wood, Brittany 
Murphy, Nick Stahl, Michael Clarke Duncan. (R, 126 
min.) Get ready for the sequel by refreshing yourself 
with the characters of this noir crime thriller. (*) 
(©Flix Brewhouse, 7:30pm. 


Stand by Me (1986) D; Rob Reiner; with Wil 
Wheaton, River Phoenix, Corey Feldman, Jerry 
O’Connell, Kiefer Sutherland, Casey Siemaszko, John 
Cusack, Richard Dreyfuss. (R, 87 min.) Deschutes 
Beer Dinner. This sweet, nostalgic movie is one of 
the best things Rob Reiner has been involved with 
in his career. The young cast is a true knockout. For 
menu and beer pairings, visit www.drafthouse.com. (*) 
(©Alamo Lakeline, 7pm. 

Steel Magnolias (1989) D; Herbert Ross; with 
Sally Field, Shirley MacLaine, Daryl Hannah, Olympia 
Dukakis, Julia Roberts. (PG, 117 min.) Girlie Night. 
Women’s bonds are admired in their many facets in 
this hilarious ode to Southern womanhood. 

(©Alamo Slaughter Lane, 7:15pm. 

A Streetcar Named Desire (1951) Summer 
Film Classics: Fifties Brando. (©Paramount, 
9:10pm. (See Tuesday.) 

O Summer Camp Nightmare (1987) D. Bert L. 
Dragin; with Chuck Connors, Charlie Stratton. (PG-13, 
89 min.) Weird Wednesday. It’s Lord of the Flies at 
a summer camp, as a spoiled rich kid convinces an 
entire camp to overthrow the evil camp director. 
(©Alamo Ritz, 10:15pm. 

O Whitey: United States of America v. 

James J. Bulger (2014) D; Joe Berlinger. (R, 

107 min.) AFS Doc Nights. This doc examines the 
monstrous mafia gangster who ruled Boston while 
holding the No. 2 spot on America’s Most Wanted 
criminals list, right behind Osama Bin Laden. 

Bulger controlled the South Boston streets for 
years, but was never charged with even a misde- 
meanor, due mainly to endless bribery. (©Marchesa 
Hall & Theatre, 7:30pm. 

SPACES 

Back to the Future (1985) D; Robert Zemeckis; 
with Michael J. Fox. (PG, 111 min.) lOlX Summer 
Cinema Series. 1.21 gigawatts of nostalgia. (*) 
(©Central Market North, 8:30pm. 

O Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981) See p.64. 

KIDS 

An American Tail (©Alamo Slaughter Lane, 
10:15am, 3:50pm. 

Mr. Peabody & Sherman (©CM Cedar Park, 

Hill Country Galleria, Lake Creek 7, Movies 8, 
Tinseltown South, 10am. 

Range (©Alamo Village, 10:45am. 

Tim Burton's Corpse Bride (©Alamo Lakeline, 
10:40am 


THURSDAY 14 

The Expendables Marathon Does watching all 
three Expendables movies in a row sound like time 
well spent? Then you probably already have your 
ticket. (©Tinseltown North, 3:15pm. 

Godzilla (1998) D; Roland Emmerich; with Matthew 
Broderick, Jean Reno, Maria Pitillo, Hank Azaria, Kevin 
Dunn, Michael Lerner, Harry Shearer, Arabella Field, 
Vicki Lewis. (PG-13, 139 min.) NCM Fathom: RiffTrax 
Live. Join Michael J. Nelson, Kevin Murphy, and Bill 
Corbett as they skewer one of the worst entries in 
that Japanese monster’s career. (*) (©CM Stone 
Hill Town Center, Tinseltown North, CM Cedar Park, 
Arbor, Hill Country Galleria, Metropolitan, Southpark 
Meadows, 7pm. 

O Internes Can't Take Money (1937) D. 

Alfred Santell; with Joel McCrea, Barbara Stanwyck, 
Lloyd Nolan. (NR, 78 min.) AFS Essentiai Cinema: 
Barbara Stanwyck. Stanwyck shines in this tale 
of a woman in search of her daughter among the 
crime ridden skid rows of New York. The first of 
many incarnations of Dr. Kildare. (©Marchesa Hall & 
Theatre, 7:30pm. 

Monty Python Live (Mostly) (2014) Out of 

Bounds Comedy Festivai Presents. (©Alamo Village, 
7pm. (See Thursday, 8/7.) 

Psycho (1960) D; Alfred Hitchcock; with Anthony 
Perkins. (NR, 109 min.) Summer Fiim Ciassics: 
Hitchcock Week. The Bates Motel is always open 
in Hitchcock’s enduring horror classic. (Double bill: 
Vertigo.) (©Paramount, 7pm. 

Rope (1948) D; Alfred Hitchcock; with James 
Stewart, Farley Granger, John Dali. (NR, 80 min.) 
Summer Fiim Ciassics: Hitchcock Week. Hitchcock 
famously experimented in Rope with temporal 
structure (the film is shot in supposed real time in 
10-minute-long takes). It tells the story of two thrill 
murderers who were based on Leopold and Loeb. 
(Double bill: The Trouble With Harry.) (*) 

(©Stateside at the Paramount, 7:15pm. 


O The Trouble With Harry (1955) D. Alfred 
Hitchcock; with Edmund Gwenn, John Forsythe, 
Shirley MacLaine, Mildred Natwick, Mildred Dunnock, 
Jerry Mathers. (NR, 99 min.) Summer Fiim Ciassics: 
Hitchcock Week. Hitchcock’s comedic charms 
shine in this delightful story about a corpse that 
just won’t stay buried. In the interim, the dead 
body brings two couples together in love and gets 
a whole town hopping. In her film debut, Shirley 
MacLaine is a treat. (Double bill: Rope.) (*) 
(©Stateside at the Paramount, 8:55pm. 

O Vannin' (2013) D; Andrew J. Morgan and 
Nicholas Nummerdor. (NR, 60 min.) Customized 
vans and the quirky characters who drive them 
are the subject of this doc. (©Alamo Slaughter 
Lane, 7:15pm. 


Vertigo (1958) D; Alfred Hitchcock; with James 
Stewart, Kim Novak, Barbara Bel Geddes. (PG, 130 
min.) Summer Fiim Ciassics: Hitchcock Week. One 
of the thrill master’s most psychologically dense 
and twisted films, in which obsession, commitment, 
and dual identities merge to create a voluptuous 
tale of thwarted love. (Double bill: Psycho.) (*) 
(©Paramount, 9:10pm. 

KIDS 

An American Tail (©Alamo Slaughter Lane, 9:25am. 

Mr. Peabody & Sherman (©CM Cedar Park, Lake 
Creek 7, Movies 8, 10am. 

Range (©Alamo Village, 9:45am. 

Tim Burton's Corpse Bride 

(©Alamo Lakeline, 10am 


IMAX SEE SHOWTiMES FOR SCHEDULE 

D-Day: Normandy 1944 (2014) D; Pascal Vuong; narrated by Tom Brokaw. (NR, 40 min.) Tom Brokaw nar- 
rates this film about the largest Allied operation of World War II. 

Texas: The Big Picture (2003) D; Scott Swofford; narrated by Colby Donaldson. (NR, 39 min.) Texas is 
shown to be a land broad enough to produce everything from grapefruit to microchips. 

Titans of the Ice Age (2013) D; David Clark; narrated by Christopher Plummer. (NR, 45 min.) Computer- 
generated imagery brings to life this mysterious era of the Ice Age. 

Under the Sea 3D (2009) D; Howard Hall. (NR, 40 min.) The impact of global warming is examined in the 
waters of Southern Australia, New Guinea, and elsewhere in the Indo-Pacific region. 



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austinchronicle.com AUGUST 8, 2014 the Austin chronicle 67 







LISTINGS 


AUGUST 8-14 


EDITED BY RAOUL HERNANDEZ 


LIVE MUSIC VENUES P.72 • ROADSHOWS & CLUB LISTINGS P.74 

earache! More Alvin brothers reunion ataustinchronicle.com/earache. 



Aimee Mann and Ted Leo can’t stop ban- 
tering, volleying back and forth over a confer- 
ence phone line as they split coasts before 
heading on tour together as the Both. 

“What I really miss is being able to be in 
the same room to play something or for us to 
try a harmony together,” admits Mann from 
Los Angeles. “But honestly, if we were writ- 
ing in the same room, Ted would play me an 
idea and I’d probably go in a different room 
to work on it. You have to have time on your 
own to chew over something, whatever your 
task is, whether you’re trying to finish a verse 
lyrically, or come up with the bridge. It’s hard 
to do that when the other person is just sit- 
ting there sipping their coffee waiting.” 

“Tinish that line yet, finish that line yet, 
how’s that line?”’ chimes in Leo from the 
East Coast. 


“‘How’s it going, how’s it going over there, 
got any ideas?”’ counters Mann, laughing. 

That camaraderie evolved from their bands 
touring together into a full collaboration on 
this year’s eponymous debut LP The Both 
finds perfect balance between Leo’s punk 
roots and Mann’s introspective ballads 
without compromising either. 

“For me, the best thing about this band has 
been to rediscover and remember how excit- 
ing and fun it is to be a part of a band, not 
have it be all me or all Ted,” offers Boston’s 
former ’Til Tuesday frontwoman. “It’s exciting 
to be part of a unit rather than the engine of 
the train - responsible for everything.” 

“Right,” agrees Leo, “which we both have 
been to one degree or another for a long 
time. It’s nice to really feel like you’re part of 
a band.” - Doug Freeman 


Mohawkf Wednesday 13 

Lemuria opens 



Outside of a couple reunions with seminal 
roots crew the Blasters, the brothers Alvin 
haven’t shared the stage much since Dave 
left the band in 1986. Phil nearly died while 
touring Spain in 2012, prompting the Downey, 
Calif., siblings to reconsider their relationship. 
Something they always agreed upon was a 
love for the blues, especially Big Bill Broonzy. 

“In the Thirties, Big Bill was a star in the 
blues world,” says Dave. “Robert Johnson 
was a relative unknown.” 

Among pre-World War II bluesmen, Broonzy 
still gets overlooked today, though his songs 
remain as potent as, if not more than, those 
of the better-known Johnson. “Key to the 
Highway” - covered on what some have 
already called the album of the year, the Alvins’ 
Broonzy tribute Common Ground - qualified as 
a blues standard beginning in the Sixties. 


“In my opinion,” offers Dave, “there’s 
Leadbelly, Woody Guthrie, the Carter Family, 
and Big Bill Broonzy - the four pillars of the 
Parthenon of American roots music.” 

“We had an EP” relates Phil, “and when 
the people at Yep Roc listened to it, they 
wanted more.” 

“We recorded five songs and that was 
the original idea,” agrees Dave. ’’When the 
label heard it they came back and said, ‘How 
about a full album?’ On one hand, yes, it’s an 
homage to Bill Broonzy. On the other, it’s an 
homage to brotherly love. 

“I get a lot of that at shows now. Guys 
have been coming up to me and saying, ‘I 
haven’t talked to my brother in 20 years. I 
got this record, and I called my brother.’” 

- Jim Caligiuri 


Continental Clubf Thursday 14 


THE HOLD STEADY 

Frank, Fridays 

Part-time music venue and full-time 
sausage vendor, Frank celebrates five 
years in action with the Hold Steady, 
crafters of bar rock for the con- 
templative urbanite. Led by squinty 
spoken-word singer Craig Finn, the 
Brooklyn-by-way-of-Minneapolis quintet 
continues gushing out caricatures of 
middle-American everymen on sixth 
studio LP Teeth Dreams, another 
chapter in the group’s decade-long 
channeling of the Replacements’ 

Let It Be and Springsteen’s Born 
to Run. Cheap Girls offer Smoking 
Popes-style pop-punk, heavy with 
the nostalgia and sincerity typical of 
Midwestern acts. - Kevin Curtin 

WILD SEEDS, WALTER 
SALAS-HUMARA, 

THE SILOS 

ABGB, Fridays 

In town for his dog-art instal- 
lation at Yard Dog Gallery, Walter 
Salas-Humara also packs a new disc 
he’s eager to show off. Curve and 
Shake is the former Austinite’s third 
solo disc and his first away from 
the Silos in 18 years. It finds the 
now-Flagstaff, Arizona-based song- 
writer exploring divergent moods with 
expansive arrangements on tunes 


he felt weren’t quite appropriate for 
his veteran band. Here he bands 
together with expert locals includ- 
ing Wild Seeds Randy Franklin and 
Michael Hall, and guitar virtuoso Rich 
Brotherton. - Jim Caligiuri 

ALEJANDRO ESCOVEDO 

Cactus Cafe, Saturday 9 

Austin music’s ambassador to 
the world, Alejandro Escovedo com- 
pletely subverted the idea of “Austin 
singer-songwriter.” Credit a musical 
perspective equally Lou Reed and Ian 
Hunter as it is Townes Van Zandt. His 
next release comes courtesy of new 
supergroup the Fauntleroys, wherein 
he plays bass with an all-star cast 
featuring Richard Hell & the Voidoids 
guitarist Ivan Julian, tunesmith 
Nicholas Tremulis, and drummer 
Linda Pitmon, all playing updated 
Seventies artpunk. - Tim Stegall 

WANDA JACKSON/ 

JOHN MAYALL 

Continental Club, Saturday 9/ 
One World Theatre, 

Thursday 14 

Hard to fathom a time when 
people argued over whether musi- 
cians could rock credibly past 30. At 
76 and 80, respectively, pioneering 
rockabilly heroine Jackson and British 


blues innovator Mayall remain true to 
the iconoclastic standards that they 
set back in the Fifties and Sixties. 
Still hardy road warriors after more 
than half a century, they deliver their 
trademark styles with fervor and 
expertise, commanding stages with 
a timeless authority that transcends 
nostalgia. - Scott Schinder 

OFF! WITH DALE GROVER 

Mohawk, Saturday 9 

Welcome to punk rock central. 
America’s best slam-rock band pro- 
motes its recent Wasted Years with 
powerhouse Melvins drummer Dale 
Grover temporarily subbing for Mario 
Rubalcaba (Rocket From the Crypt/ 
Earthless). Vocalist Keith Morris 
(Black Flag/Circle Jerks), guitar- 
ist Dmitri Coats (Burning Brides), 
and bassist Steve McDonald (Redd 
Kross) remain in place to punish 
their infectious brute-core riffs. Also 
playing: Porn-thrash legends the 
Dwarves, flogging their own new LP 
The Dwarves Invented Rock & Roll. 

No mosh pit will be left unbruised, no 
panties un soiled. - Tim Stegall 

MAXWELL 

Long Center, Tuesday 12 

Curating his velvety brand of neo 
soul, the Brooklynite shot to fame 
in the mid-Nineties as Motown’s 


heir apparent with Maxwell’s Urban 
Hang Suite. Popular demand never 
matched his artistic drive, so the 
smooth operator took an eight-year 
breather before his latest release, 
BLACKsummers’night in 2009, 
which nabbed him two Grammys in 
the R&B category. Where his debut 
luxuriated in rolling grooves, the lat- 
est platforms silky smooth vox and 
an extensive new band. 

- Nina Hernandez 

NINE INCH NAILS, 
SOUNDGARDEN, 
DILLINGER ESCAPE PLAN 

Circuit of the Americas, 
Thursday 14 

The Nineties continues its come- 
back with the advent of a co-headlin- 
ing tour featuring two of the decade’s 
biggest and best. NIN comes stripped 
down to a lean, mean quartet from 
the eightpiece beast it last brought 
to town, upping the aggro while still 
pimping the groovilicious Hesitation 
Marks. Relegating its most recent 
slab King Animal to the back burner, 
alt-metal paladin Soundgarden keeps 
the grunge faith with a set that 
reportedly drives Badmotorfinger into 
the Superunknown. Spazzprogcore 
pioneer the Dillinger Escape Plan 
rips first. - Michael Toland 


m-stores: Friday: Otonana Trio, Yatagarasu, Mighty Mountain, Trailer Space, 7pm; Saturday: MexMode, Greedy Money 
Worid, Norman Base, 40s, Trailer Space, 7pm; Tuesday: Duii, Turncioak, Defeat the Hero, Trailer Space, 7pm 


68 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE AUGUSTS, 2014 austinchronicle.com 


soundcheck 

BY RAOUL HERNANDEZ 


JERRY GARCIA FEST 

ThreadgilTs World Headquarters, Friday 8 
Deadeye tributes Capt. Trips with guests 
Ray Benson, Gordy Quist, and more. 

SOUNDTRACK SERIES 

North Door, Saturday 9 

Johnny Goudie and others recount the 
songs that changed their lives. 

JOHNNY WALKER’S BIRTHDAY 

The Roost, Saturday 9 

Beloved KLBJ deejay summons the original 
Soul Hat lineup and Podunk. 

CLAP YOUR HANDS SAY YEAH/ 

CASKET GIRLS 

Mohawk, Monday 11 

Philly pop (outside) meets Savannah’s 
Greene Sisters (inside), with Clap frontman 
Alec Ounsworth first. 

HAWTHORNE HEIGHTS 

Red 7, Tuesday 12 

Breeders gone dudes? 

CRITTERS BUGGIN’ 

Parish, Wednesday 13 

Seattle sax spazz Skerik back where 
it all began. 

THAO & THE GET DOWN STAY DOWN 

ACL Live at the Moody Theater, Thursday 14 

Austin City Limits taping. 











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THUH^DAY §/7 
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FRIDAY 8/S 

' Leo Rondeau Tour KickofE with 
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Top of the Bopc with 
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8:30 - $10 

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austinchronicle.com AUGUST8,2014 the Austin chronicle 69 





















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IN ITS 56 YEARS, THE CONTINENTAL EVOLVED FROM BURLESQUE HOUSE TO ANYTHING-GOES ROCK ROOM 
TO REVAMPED ROCKABILLY JOINT WITH A KILLER JUKEBOX. SQUEEZE IN, GET SWEATY. - ROLLING STONE 



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70 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE AUGUST8,2014 austinchronicle.com 






Austin City Limits Live at The Moody Theater 



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austinchronicle.com AUGUST 8, 2014 the Austin chronicle 71 


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LIVE MUSIC VENUES 


290 WEST BAR & GRILL, 12013 Hwy. 290 W„ 512/288-0808 

ACL LIVE AT THE MOODY THEATER, 

310 W. Willie Nelson Blvd., 512/225-7999 
AUSTIN ALE HOUSE, 301 W. Sixth 
AMAYA’S TACO VILLAGE, 5804 N. 1-35, 512/458-2531 
AMPED AUSTIN, 300 E. Sixth, 512/469-7655 
ANDERSON MILL TAVERN, 10401 Anderson Mill, 
512/918-1599 

ANGEL’S ICEHOUSE, 21815 Hwy. 71 W., Spicewood, 
512/264-3777 

ANNEX AT CLUB 1808, 1808 E. 12th, 512/524-2519 

AUSTIN 360 AMPHITHEATER AT CIRCUIT OF THE AMERICAS, 

9201 Circuit of the Americas Blvd., 800/745-3000 

AUSTIN BEER GARDEN BREWING CO., 1305 W. Oltorf St., 
512/298-2242 

AUSTIN JAVA CAFE & BAR, 1608 Barton Springs Rd., 
512/482-9450 

AUSTIN ROLLER RINK, 11600 Manchaca Rd., 512/292-7528 

THE BACKYARD AT BEE CAVE, 13801 Bee Cave Pkwy., 
512/651-5033 
BADLANDS, 1203 Chicon 

BAKER ST. PUB & GRILL, 3003 S. Lamar, 512/691-9140 
BAR 141, 141 E. Hopkins, San Marcos, 512/558-7399 

BARTON CREEK FARMERS MARKET, 

2901 South Capital of Texas Hwy, 512/443-0143 
BARTON SPRINGS POOL, 2201 Barton Springs Rd., 
512/867-3080 

BAT BAR, 218 E. Sixth, 512/474-6363 
BB ROVERS, 12636 Research Ste. B-101, 512/335-9504 
B.D. RILEY’S IRISH PUB, 204 E. Sixth, 512/494-1335 
BEERLAND, 711 Red River, 512/479-7625 
THE BELMONT, 305 W. Sixth, 512/476-2100 
BOURBON GIRL, 212 E. Sixth, 512/433-6983 
BROKEN SPOKE, 3201 S. Lamar, 512/442-6189 
THE BROWN BAR, 201 W. Eighth, 512/480-8330 
BUNGALOW, 92 Rainey, 512/363-5475 
BUTTERFLY BAR AT THE VORTEX, 2307 Manor Rd. 

BUZZ MILL COFFEE, 1505 Town Creek, 512/912-9221 
C-BOY’S HEART & SOUL, 2008 S. Congress Ave. 

CACTUS CAFE, Texas Union, UT campus, 512/475-6515 
THE CAPITAL GRILLE, 117 W. Fourth, 512/322-2005 
CAROUSEL LOUNGE, 1110 E. 52nd, 512/452-6790 
CENTRAL MARKET NORTH, 4001 N. Lamar, 512/206-1000 
CENTRAL MARKET SOUTH, 4477 S. Lamar, 512/899-4300 
CHEATHAM STREET WAREHOUSE, 119 Cheatham St., 

San Marcos, 512/353-3777 
CHEER UP CHARLIE’S, 900 Red River, 512/524-1111 
CHEZ ZEE, 5406 Balcones, 512/454-2666 
CHUGGIN’ MONKEY, 219 E. Sixth, 512/476-5015 
CONTINENTAL CLUB GALLERY, 1315 S. Congress, upstairs, 
512/441-2444 

CONTINENTAL CLUB, 1315 S. Congress, 512/441-2444 
COTTON CLUB, 212 E. Davilla St., Granger, 512/859-0700 
COUPLAND DANCEHALL, 101-103 Hoxie, Coupland, 
512/856-2226 

CU-29, 720 Brazos St., 512/474-0029 
DIRTY DOG BAR, 505 E. Sixth, 512/236-9800 
DIVE BAR, 1703 Guadalupe 
DIZZY ROOSTER, 306 E. Sixth, 512/236-1667 
THE DOGWOOD, 715 W. Sixth, 512/531-9062 
DONN’S DEPOT, 1600 W. Fifth, 512/478-0336 
THE DRAG BAR, 2324 Guadalupe 
EAST SEVENTH EATS, 1403 E. Seventh 
EAST SIDE SHOW ROOM, 1100 E. Sixth, 512/467-4280 
EDDIE V’S EDGEWATER GRILLE, 301 E. Fifth, 512/472-1860 
EDGE OF TOWN SALOON & GRILL, 15601 Vision Dr., 
512/251-9358 

EL SOL Y LA LUNA, 600 E. Sixth, 512/444-7770 
ELEPHANT ROOM, 315 Congress, 512/473-2279 
ELYSIUM, 705 Red River, 512/478-2979 

EMPIRE CONTROL ROOM, 606 E. Seventh 
FADO IRISH PUB & RESTAURANT, 214 W. Fourth, 
512/457-0172 

FAIR BEAN COFFEE, 2210-1 S. First, 512/444-2326 
FIREHOUSE LOUNGE, 605 Brazos, 512/201-2522 
FLAMINGO CANTINA, 515 E. Sixth, 512/494-9336 
FRANK, 407 Colorado, 512/494-6916 
FREDA’S SEAFOOD GRILLE, 10903 Pecan Park, 512/506-8700 
FRIENDS, 208 E. Sixth, 512/320-8193 
GIDDY UPS, 12010 Manchaca Rd., 512/280-4732 
GINNY’S LITTLE LONGHORN SALOON, 5434 Burnet Rd., 
GREEN PASTURES RESTAURANT, 811 W. Live Oak, 
512/444-4747 

GRUENE HALL, 1281 Gruene Rd., New Braunfels, 
830/606-1281 

GUERO’S TACO BAR, 1412 S. Congress, 512/447-7688 
HALCYON, 218 W. Fourth, 512/472-9637 
HEB CAFE MUELLER, 1801 E. 51st St., 512/236-1020 
HOLE IN THE WALL, 2538 Guadalupe, 512/302-1470 
HOLY MOUNTAIN, 617 E. Seventh, 512/391-1943 
HOTEL VEGAS, 1500 E. Sixth, 512/524-1584 
HOUSE WINE, 408 Josephine, 512/322-5210 


HYDE PARK THEATRE, 511 W. 43rd, 512/479-7529 
IGUANA GRILL, 2900 RR 620 N., 512/266-8439 
IRIE BEAN COFFEE BAR, 2310 S. Lamar #102, 512/326-4636 
KICK BUTT COFFEE, 5775 Airport #725, 512/454-5425 
LA PALAPA, 6640 Hwy. 290 E., 512/459-8729 
LAMBERTS, 401 W. Second, 512/494-1500 
LAS PALOMAS, 3201 Bee Caves Rd. #122, 512/327-9889 
LITTLE WOODROW’S, 520 W. Sixth, 512/477-2337 
LITTLE WOODROW’S, 6301 Parmer, 512/918-2337 
LITTLE WOODROW’S, 9500 S. 1-35, 512/282-2336 
LONG CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS, 

701 W. Riverside, 512/457-5100 
LONGBRANCH INN, 1133 E. 11th, 512/472-5477 
LUCKY LOUNGE, 209-A W. Fifth, 512/479-7700 
MARIA’S TACO XPRESS, 2529 S. Lamar, 512/444-0261 
MERCER STREET DANCEHALL, 332 Mercer, Dripping Springs, 
512/858-4314 

MIDWAY FIELD HOUSE, 2015 E. Riverside 
MOHAWK, 912 Red River, 512/482-8404 
MOZART’S COFFEE ROASTERS, 3825 Lake Austin Blvd., 
512/477-2900 

NASTY’S, 606 Maiden, 512/453-4349 
NEWORLDELI, 4101 Guadalupe, 512/451-7170 
THE NOOK, 309 E. Sixth, 512/709-1551 
THE NORTH DOOR, 502 Brushy, 512/485-3002 
NUTTY BROWN CAFE, 12225 Hwy. 290 W., 512/301-4648 
THE OASIS, 6550 Comanche Trail, 512/266-2442 
THE OFFICE LOUNGE, 1207 Leander Rd., Georgetown, 
512/869-1137 

ONE WORLD THEATRE, 7701 Bee Caves Rd., 512/330-9500 
ONE-2-ONE BAR, 1509 S. Lamar, 512/473-0121 
PARISH, 214 E. Sixth, 512/473-8381 
PATSY’S CAFE, 5001 E. Ben White, 512/444-2020 

POODIE’S HILLTOP ROADHOUSE, 22308 Hwy. 71 W., 
Spicewood, 512/264-0318 

RAY BENSON’S RATTLE INN, 610 Nueces, 512/373-8306 
REALE’S PIZZA & CAFE, 13450 Hwy. 183 N., 512/335-5115 
RED 7, 611 E. Seventh, 512/476-8100 
REMEDY, 209 E. Sixth, 512/391-1500 
REPUBLIC LIVE, 301 W. Fifth, 512/480-9888 
RILEY’S TAVERN, 8894 FM 1102, Hunter, 512/392-3132 
ROADHOUSE, 1103 Wonder St., Round Rock, 512/218-0813 
THE ROOST, 2113 Wells Branch Parkway, 512/386-1946 
ROSS’ OLD AUSTIN CAFE, 11800 N. Lamar #6, 512/835-2414 
RUMI’S TAVERN, 18626 FM 1431, Jonestown, 512/267-4327 
RUSSIAN HOUSE, 307 E. Fifth, 512/428-5442 
RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE, 107 W. Sixth, 512/477-7884 
THE SAHARA LOUNGE, 1413 Webberville Rd., 512/927-0700 
SAM’S TOWN POINT, 2115 Allred, 512/282-0083 
THE SANCTUARY, 8647 Hwy. 290 W., 512/288-2199 
SATELLITE BISTRO & BAR, 5900 Slaughter #400, 
512/288-9994 

SAXON PUB, 1320 S. Lamar, 512/448-2552 
THE SCOOT INN, 1308 E. Fourth, 512/478-6200 
SHADY GROVE, 1624 Barton Springs Rd., 512/474-9991 
SHENANIGANS, 13233 Pond Springs Rd., 512/258-9717 

SHERLOCK’S BAKER ST. PUB & GRILL, 

9012 Research Ste. C-1, 512/380-9443 

SHOOTERS BILLIARDS CEDAR PARK, 601 E. Whitestone, 
Cedar Park, 512/260-2060 
SHOOTERS BILLIARDS NORTH, 11416 RR 620 N., 

512/401-2060 

SKI SHORES CAFE, 2905 Pearce, 512/394-7511 
THE SKYLARK LOUNGE, 2039 Airport, 512/730-0759 

SMOKEY DENMARK’S BBQ TRAILER, 3505 E. Fifth, 

SPEAKEASY, 412 Congress, 512/476-8017 

SPIDER HOUSE BALLROOM, 2906 Fruth, 512/480-9562 

STRANGE BREW LOUNGE SIDE, 5326 Manchaca Rd., 
512/828-7636 

STUBB’S, 801 Red River, 512/480-8341 
SWAN DIVE, 615 Red River, 512/994-2819 
SWEETWATER BCRR, 730 W. Stassney, 

TAVERN ON MAIN, 116 N. Main, Buda, 512/295-0121 
TEXAS BAR & GRILL, 14611 Burnet Rd., 512/255-1300 
THE THIRSTY NICKEL, 325 E. Sixth, 512/473-8891 
THREADGILL’S WORLD HQ, 301 W. Riverside, 512/472-9304 
TOM’S TABOOLEY, 2928 Guadalupe #102, 512/479-7337 
TRAILER SPACE RECORDS, 1401-A Rosewood, 512/524-1445 
TRIPLE CROWN, 206 N. Edward Gary St., San Marcos, 
512/396-2236 

UNCLE BILLY’S BREW & QUE, 1530 Barton Springs Rd., 
512/476-0100 

WAKE THE DEAD COFFEEHOUSE, 1432 RR12, San Marcos, 
512/754-9253 

WATER TROUGH AT LONE STAR COURT, 

10901 Domain Drive, 512/836-3030 
WATERLOO ICE HOUSE, 1106 W. 38th, 512/451-5245 
THE WHITE HORSE, 500 Comal, 512/502-4637 
WINFLO OSTERIA, 1315 W. Sixth, 512/582-1027 
Z’TEJAS, 1110 W. Sixth, 512/478-5355 
ZED’S, 501 Canyon Ridge, 512/339-9337 
ZILKER PARK, 2100 Barton Springs Rd., 512/974-6700 


72 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE AUGUST8,2014 austinchronicle.com 




SHERAH AND THE FINE SOULS 

>/l WITH AFROFREQUE am DJ JERICHO ONE 


DJ JERICHO ONE 9PM-CL0S[ 


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AUG 
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JUEGOS RANCHEROS NO COVER 7P 
PRESENTS RICHARD HOGG & HONEYSLUG’S ‘HOHOKUM’ 


lAUG 
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W/ JOHNNY GOODIE. MIA MARTINA. ELLEN STADER 
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it VOTED #1 ACOUSTIC MUSIC VENUE 20U1-2011! it 


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★ THURSDAY, AUOUST 1 4 - ELISE DAVIS 

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★ FRIDAY. AUGUST 29 - SHEMEKIA COPELAHD 

★ THURSDAY. SEPTEMBER 4 - CHRIS SMITHER 

★ SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 27 - AHDV MCKEE 

★ WEDHESDAY, OCTOBER 1 - JUSTIH CURRIE 

WITH THE MASTERSOHS 


TICKETS FOB UPCOMIHS SHOWS HOW OH SKLEKT: 

www.cactuscale.org 


The Cactus is located inside the Texas Union Building. 
Happy Hour 4-7pm, Monday-Friday. 

All shows @ 8:30pm unless noted. 
www.laceliook.com/cacliiscaleauslin 

23rd & Guadalupe ,,i,hLkutx 
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austinchronicle.com AUGUST 8, 2014 the Austin chronicle 73 



























. . ■ . 

dcye Presents c « ' 

JERRY GARCIA FEST»'- 

Katie Holmes & Ray Benson 

of Asleep at the Wheel and 
Gordy Quist of The Band of Heathens 

rrwkt Ciiarrckriia 

Deadeye Presents 

JERRY GARCIA FESr»'< 

with members of Wood & Wire 

rm± 


Jon Emery’s Hillbilly Gospel 

Carson Alexander 9)> 
ErjcTe$$mer«^> 


Ham 


E runt rUtHTrcUv 


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9pm 



JOE PUG 


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t runt C^r.ckdB 


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#" 

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ISHINYRIBS»» 

JME rnsnt rSitHTrckda 


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E runt t^itarrcAdn 



DANNY SANTOS 


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BLUEGRASSVATOS 


FLOYD DOMINO 7P^ 

AUSTIN JAZZ WORKSHOP "a^ 




2015 E RIVERSIDE DR. RUSTIN, TX 78741 


SYLVAN ESSO 

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MOVED FROM THE PARISH; 

flit PREVIOUS PURCHASES mil BE HONORED 


DELTA SPIRIT 

W/EDJ 

REBIRTH BRASS BAND 

AN EVENING WITH; 

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SEPT 

20 


TYCHD 


W/ CHRISTOPHER WILLITS 


DEnER THAN EZRA 

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7 W/ WE ARE THE IN CROWD. FIREWORKS. 
CANDY HEARTS 

TICKETS ON-SHLE THIS FRIDflr AT I2 PM! 


CHARLI XCX 


OCTOBER 


ANDERLIN 


OCTOBER JULIAN CASABLANCAS 

♦THEYOIDZ 


OCTOBER 

31 


THE REVIVALISTS 

W/ THE LONDON SOULS AND MONOPHONICS 


FOR TICKETS AND ADDITIONAL 
LISTINGS. PLEASE VISIT: 


6416 N Lamar Blvd (<"2)451-5440 


WWW.EMOSAUSTIN.COM 


® ALL AGES VENUE ® ROADSHOW O RECOMMENDED ^ HEAR MUSIC ONLINE 

OJIB LISTINGS 


AMAYA’S TACO VILLAGE Johnny 
Gonzales (6:00) 

B.D. RILEY’S IRISH PUB Kristen Gibbs 
( 8 : 00 ) 

BEERLAND Fast Love, Dead Strangers, 
Blackno.ise, 5 Years and Counting 
(9:00) 

THE BELMONT Dead Man’s Mail, Zoso 
( 8 : 00 ) © 

BOURBON GIRL Chris Ray (5:00), Clay 
Compania (9:00) 

BROKEN SPOKE Tony Harrison, Dance 
Lessons, Jesse Daytonjt (6:00) 

BUZZ MILL COFFEE Bob Cheevers 
C-BOY’S HEART & SOUL Paul Oscher 
( 6 : 00 ) 

CACTUS CAFE The CBGB (8:30) © 

THE CAPITAL GRILLE James Polk Trio 
( 6 : 00 ) 

CAROUSEL LOUNGE Invincible Czars 
(9:00) 

CENTRAL MARKET NORTH Elizabeth 
McQueen (6:30) © 

CENTRAL MARKET SOUTH Blackbird 3 
(6:30) © 

CHEATHAM STREET WAREHOUSE 

Jamie Cortinas, Russell Bisbey, Troy 
Stone, Chris Strand 

CHEER UP CHARLIE’S Dubb Nubb, 
Slomo Drags, Sweet Spirit, Selva 
Oscura, Corduroi © 

CHUGGIN’ MONKEY John Chavez (5:00), 
Tish & Misbehavin’ (9:00) 

CONTINENTAL CLUB Shurman (6:30), 

A. Sinclair, What Made Milwaukee 
Famous (10:00) O 
CONTINENTAL CLUB GALLERY Liv 

Meuller, Tameca Jones (8:30) 


DIRTY DOG BAR Ocean of Stars (10:00) 
DIZZY ROOSTER Phil Luna (4:30), 

Sonny Wolf (9:30) 

DONN’S DEPOT Murphy’s Inlaws 
THE DRAG BAR Sanchez Mac (9:00) 
FIREHOUSE LOUNGE Rhino House Band 
( 10 : 00 ) 

FREDA’S SEAFOOD GRILLE Rich 
Demarco (5:00) © 

GIDDY UPS Open Mic (8:00) 

GINNY’S LITTLE LONGHORN SALOON 

Starlings, TN (6:00), Alvin Crow (9:00) 
GRUENE HALL Greg Reichel (7:00) © 
GUERO’S TACO BAR Los Flames (6:30) 
HEB CAFE MUELLER CJ the Best (6:00) 
HOLE IN THE WALL Garner Sloan, 

Landon Mayfeux, Inside Voices, Space 
Brothers, Big Cabin 
HOLY MOUNTAIN Panoramas, Bali 
Yaaahjt, Midnight Masses, Ringo 
Deathstarr (9:00) O© 

HOTEL VEGAS Bottom Feeders, Slow 
Motion Rider, Old Warhorse, Sweat 
Lodge (10:00) © 

IRIE BEAN COFFEE BAR Open Mic w/ 
Lisa Kettyle (6:00) © 

LAMBERTS Northern Quarters (9:30) © 
LUCKY LOUNGE Mon Freres Amigos, 
Light the Sun (8:00) 

MERCER STREET DANCEHALL Doug 
Moreland & the Flying Armadillos (7:30) 
MOHAWK Dethrone, Deadly Reign, Doom 
Siren, Phobia (9:00) © 

NEWORLDELI Fletcher Clark 
THE NOOK Johnny Reynolds, Clint 
Manning (5:00) 

0NE-2-0NE BAR Leslie Krafka CD 

Release, the Memphis Strange (7:30) 


PARISH Bottom Dollar String Band (9:00) 

POODIE’S HILLTOP ROADHOUSE James 
Byron (6:30), Johnson (8:30) © 
REPUBLIC LIVE Andrew Parsons (9:00) 
THE ROOST Ivory Tribes 
RUSSIAN HOUSE Classical Night © 
RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE Jeff 
Lofton (6:30) 

THE SAHARA LOUNGE Scan Reason, 
Atlas Maior (7:30) 

SATELLITE BISTRO & BAR Swing 
Demons (7:30) 

SAXON PUB Fightysixxed (6:00), Patrice 
Pike, Nick & Paige, Parker McCollum 
( 8 : 00 ) 

THE SCOOT INN Magic Nanna, See You 
in the Morning, Seven Circles, G. King 
(8:30) © 

SHADY GROVE Unplugged w/ Fmily Bell 
( 8 : 00 ) © 

THE SKYLARK LOUNGE Margaret 
Wright, the Kramdens (6:00) 
SPEAKEASY Cuernavaca, DJ Tre 
SPIDER HOUSE BALLROOM Blu, Med, 
Riders Against the Stormjt, P-Tek, 
Magna Carda (9:00) 

STRANGE BREW LOUNGE SIDE Cole 
Washburn (6:00); James Anthony 
Johnson & Brent Guilbault, Anthony 
Da Costa (6:00) ©@ 

STUBB’S Black-Fyed Vermillion, Black 
Irish (8:00) 

SWEETWATER BCRR Reese & the 
Bonus Plan, Red Lady (8:30) 

TAVERN ON MAIN Breting Fngel (8:30) 

THE THIRSTY NICKEL Mike Vallierejt 
(4:00), Lloyd Wright & Twister ATX (8:30) 

TRAILER SPACE RECORDS Lips & Ass 
(7:00) © 


ROAD SHOWS 


August 

THU 7 

Zoso, the Belmont 

Dubb Nubb, Cheer Up Charlie’s 

Midnight Masses, Holy Mountain 
Old Warhorse, Slow Motion Rider, 
Bottom Feeders, Hotel Vegas 
Northern Quarters, Lamberts 
Phobia, Deadly Reign, Mohawk 
Magic Nanna, the Scoot Inn 
Anthony do Costa, Strange Brew 
Lounge Side 

FRI8 

Asking Alexandria, Chiodos, 
Blessthefall, Miss May I, I 
Killed the Prom Queen, ACL 

Live at the Moody Theater 

Walter Salas-Humara & the Silos, 

Austin Beer Garden Brewing Co. 

Demoniacal Genuflection, 
Spectral Manifest, Desecrate 
the Faith, Beerland 
Featherface, Cheer Up Charlie’s 

The Hold Steady, Cheap Girls, 

Frank 

Joe King Carrasco, Gruene Hall 
Bumpin’ Uglies, Hole in the Wall 

Electric Attitude, Holy Mountain 
Mustered Courage, Lamberts 
Mr. Bill, the Digital Connection, 

Parish 

The Digital Wild, Red 7 

Josh Berwanger, Archie Powell, 

the Scoot Inn 
Ben Cina, Strange Brew 
Lounge Side 

Otonana TVio, Yata-Garasu, Trailer 
Space Records 


SAT 9 

Scowler, Old Gray, Annex at Club 
1808 

The Go Wows, Carousel Lounge 

Wanda Jackson, Mike Stinson, 

Continental Club 
Gift, Empire Control Room 
Los Nahuatlatos, Flamingo Cantina 

Modern Don Juans, Cinny’s Little 
Longhorn Saloon 

Dead Love Club, Hole in the Wall 

The Life & Times, Holy Mountain 
Jordan Moser, Hotel Vegas 
Those Howlings, Midnight 
Masses, Hotel Vegas 
Bad Faith, Mohawk 
OFF! w/ Dale Craven, Dwarves, 
Bad Antics, Gay Kiss, Mohawk 
Gerald Albright, One World 
Theatre 

Young Pharoahs, Def Rain, Red 7 
Da Mafia Six, Li’l J, Sertified, 
Lucky Lee, Red 7 
Helen Kelter Skelter, the 

Scoot Inn 

SUN 10 

Jerkagram, Beerland 
Matt Brooks & Kristen Davis, 
Russ Varnell, Silvia Neal, 

Sarah Gayle Meech, Jeff Salee, 

Continental Club 

Brushwick Jack, Hole in the Wall 

Kuudes Silma, Maailmanloppu, 

Hotel Vegas 

Mountain Sprout, Mohawk 
Blending Dandelions, the North 
Door 

Hogan Sullivan Band, 

One-2-One Bar 

Devin the Dude, Red 7 


MON 11 

Dark Time Sunshine, Rafael 
Vigilantez, Holy Mountain 
Clap Your Hands Say Yeah, Alec 
Ounsworth, Mohawk 
Casket Girls, Dreamend, Mohawk 
Bentli, One-2-One Bar 
The Black Kids, Red 7 

TUE12 

Dwight Smith, Halcyon 
Sons of Hippies, Hole in the Wall 
Beach Day, Hotel Vegas 
Maxwell, Long Center for the 
Performing Arts 
Set It Off, Our Last Night, 
Heartist, Stages & Stereos, 

Red 7 

Hawthorne Heights, Red 
Jumpsuit Apparatus, New 
Empire, Red 7 

Hooka Hey, the Sahara Lounge 

Salim Nourallah, Strange Brew 
Lounge Side 

Tdrncloak, Trailer Space Records 
Jimmie Dreams, Uncle Billy’s 
Brew & Que 

WED 13 

Crocodile Tears, Beerland 
Robynn Shayne, Cactus Cafe 
Russ Liquid, Empire Control Room 
the Both, Lemuria, Mohawk 
Critters Buggin’, Parish 
Charlie Mars, Saxon Pub 
The Coattails, Darkbird, 
365colours, Spider House 
Ballroom 

Blackwater Revival, Triple Crown 


See austinchronicle.com 

for Thursday, Aug. 14, 
and beyond. 


LISTINGS ARE FREE AND PRINTED ON A SPACE AVAILABLE BASIS. ACTS ARE LISTED CHRONOLOGICALLY. SCHEDULES ARE SUBJECT TO 
CHANGE, SO CALL CLUBS TO CONFIRM LINEUPS. START TIMES ARE PROVIDED WHERE KNOWN AND ARE PM UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED. 

SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS: MUSIC LISTINGS DEADLINE IS MONDAY MORNINGS, 9AM, FOR THAT WEEK’S ISSUE, PUBLISHED ON 
THURSDAY. PLEASE INDICATE ROADSHOWS AND RESIDENCIES. SEND VENUE NAME, ADDRESS, PHONE NUMBER, ACTS, AND START TIMES 
TO: CLUB LISTINGS, PC BOX 49066, AUSTIN, IX 78765; FAX, 458-6910; PHONE, 512/454-5766 X159; EMAIL, clubs@austinchronicle.com. 

AUSTIN BANDS: WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU. IF YOU HAVEN’T REGISTERED AND UPLOADED YOUR MP3S TO THE MUSICIANS 
REGISTER, GO TO AUSTINCHRONICLE.COM/REGISTER. ANYWHERE YOUR BAND IS MENTIONED, YOUR MUSIC WILL BE FEATURED. 


74 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE AUGUSTS, 2014 austinchronicle.com 






THU 

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Hi FifflEPARl[lNG»1413WEBBERmLERD.»5129M00 |i| 




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austinchronicle.com AUGUST 8, 2014 the Austin chronicle 75 






















CLUB LISTINGS 



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THE CHUBBY KNUCKLE CHOIR 8 30PM 

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FROM THURSDAY 


TRIPLE CROWN The Ledbetters (6:00); 
Last Nighters, Ghostbunny, Their 
Wedding, Wildfires (9:00) 

WATER TROUGH AT LONE STAR COURT 

Matt Harlan (6:00) 

THE WHITE HORSE Silas Lowe, the 
Carper Family, Woodsboss (8:00) 
WINFLO OSTERIA Casey McPherson 
Z’TEJAS The Brew (6:00) 




ACL LIVE AT THE MOODY THEATER 

I Killed the Prom Queen, Miss May 
I, Blessthefall, Chiodos, Asking 
Alexandria (6:00) © 

AMAYA’S TACO VILLAGE Johnny 
Gonzales (6:00) 

ANDERSON MILL TAVERN Sonny Wolf 
AUSTIN BEER GARDEN BREWING CO. 

Wild Bill & the Lost Knobs (6:30), 
Walter Salas-Humara & the Silos, the 
Wild Seeds (9:00) O® 

B.D. RILEY’S IRISH PUB Suzanne 
Smith, Bracken Hale (7:00) 

BEERLAND Desecrate the Faith, Spectral 
Manifest, Whore of Bethlehem, 
Demoniacal Genuflection, Id CD 
Release (9:00) ® 

THE BELMONT Magna Carda, Tucker 
Jameson, Ben Baxter Band (9:00) 
BOURBON GIRL John Frischer (5:00), 
Tish & Misbehavin’ (8:30) 

BROKEN SPOKE David Madewell, Dance 
Lessons, Gary P Nunn (6:00) 
BUTTERFLY BAR AT THE VORTEX The 
Late Joys (6:00) 

C-BOY’S HEART & SOUL Trube, Farrell & 
Sniz (10:00) 

CACTUS CAFE Bone Spirits Band 
(6:30) ® 

THE CAPITAL GRILLE James Polk Trio 
( 6 : 00 ) 

CAROUSEL LOUNGE Gallows Drifters 
(7:00) 


CENTRAL MARKET NORTH Soul Track 
Mind (6:30) © 

CENTRAL MARKET SOUTH Laura Otero 
(6:30) © 

CHEATHAM STREET WAREHOUSE 

Charlie Stout, Jonny Burke (9:00) 
CHEER UP CHARLIE’S Maryann, Chambers, 
Featherface, Auroravore, Walker 
Lukens & the Side Arms (8:00) © 
CHUGGIN’ MONKEY Sean Evan (2:00); 

Mike ValliereJ», Guilty Pleasures (5:00) 
CONTINENTAL CLUB The Blues 
Specialists (6:30), White Ghost 
Shivers, Wino VinoJ> (10:00) 
CONTINENTAL CLUB GALLERY Robert 
Kraft Trio, Mike Flanigin Trio (8:30) 
CU-29 Ron & Sam (10:00) 

DIZZY ROOSTER Aaron Navarro (5:00), 
Sean Evan & His Very Handsome 
Band (8:30) 

DONN’S DEPOT Donn & the Station 
Masters 

EAST SIDE SHOW ROOM Violet Crown 
Serenaders (11:00) 

EDGE OF TOWN SALOON & GRILL NTO 

EL SOL Y LA LUNA Marlachl Caballeros 
(8:30) © 

EMPIRE CONTROL ROOM Weird City 
Fundraiser Throwdown (9:00) 

FADO IRISH PUB & RESTAURANT 

Safety Patrol 

FLAMINGO CANTINA Jamlroqueen, 
Mamafesta 

FRANK Cheap Girls, the Hold Steady 
(9:30) O©® 

FRIENDS Lumberjane (4:00), Widgeon 
Holland, DJ Atlas (7:30) 

GINNY’S LITTLE LONGHORN SALOON 

Pissant FarmersJ* (6:00), Ruby Creek 
Band (9:00) 

GRUENE HALL Joe King Carrasco (8:00) 

©® 

GUERO’S TACO BAR The Boh Puentes 
Show (6:30) 

HEB CAFE MUELLER Billy Wilson (7:00) 
HOLE IN THE WALL Bipolar Gentlemen, 
Bumpin’ Uglies, Ichi Ni San Shi, 
Catastica ® 


HOLY MOUNTAIN DJ Darth Vena, BLSHS, 
Electric Attitude, SIP Slf?Sphynx (9:00) © 
HOTEL VEGAS John Wesley Coleman, 

J.D. Clark, Leo Rondeau (9:00) 
LAMBERTS Mustered Courage (9:30) © 
MARIA’S TACO XPRESS Leeann 
Atherton (7:00) © 

MERCER STREET DANCEHALL Silo 
Road (8:30) 

MOHAWK Right On Happy Hour (5:00) 
NEWORLDELI Dave Scher 
THE NOOK Raul Adrian Ochoa (5:00), 
Hollie & the Hype (8:30) 

THE NORTH DOOR Migrant Kids, Royal 
Forest (9:00) 

THE OFFICE LOUNGE Woodland Kings 
(9:00) 

ONE-2-ONE BAR The Damn Torpedoes, 
John Pointer (7:30) 

PARISH Brede, the Digital Connection, 

Mr. Bill (9:00) © 

POODIE’S HILLTOP ROADHOUSE 

Charlie Pierce (4:00) ®, Big Joe 
Walker, Tejas Brothers (8:00) © 

RED 7 thinknothink, BLXPLTN, the Digital 
Wild (9:00) © 

REMEDY Nuevo Jazz Group (9:00) 
ROADHOUSE SnakeBoy Johnson (9:00) 
THE ROOST Led Rocket (9:00), Led 
Rocket, Ivory Tribes (10:00) 

RUMI’S TAVERN Doors Tribute w/ 
Strange Dayz 

THE SAHARA LOUNGE Khali Haat, I Am 
the AlbatrossJ>, Los Federales, 2Rock, 
Los Kurados (7:30) 

SAXON PUB Denny Freeman (6:00), Eric 
Tessmer, Amplified HeatJ» (9:00) 

THE SCOOT INN Twin Bitches, Archie 

Powell, Josh Berwanger, Chicon (9:00) © 
SHENANIGANS Crash Landing (9:00) 
SHOOTERS BILLIARDS NORTH Nudge 
(9:00) 

THE SKYLARK LOUNGE Margaret 
Wright, Hosea Hargrove (6:00) 
SMOKEY DENMARK’S BBQ TRAILER 

Redd Volkaert w/ Floyd Domino 
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Wed, Aug 6 Rob Christensen of Saturday’s Radio 
Thu, Aug 7 Jeremy Nail 


Fri, Aug 8 Nancy Scott’s Songwriter Circle 
Sat, Aug 9 The Merles 
Mon, Aug 11 Tony Moreno Happy Hour Show 
Tue,Augi2 Jane Bond Happy Hour Show 
Wed, Aug 13 Michael Hays 

lo.Oil lEraBjamW h 
































LIVE MUSIC this week in 



Monday, Augusl Spin Republic c^Tejcas Big Band 

CCtcft! 'Enter! 'VVin' Enter tfie Oasis Efioto Contestl 


$500 Casfi ^ratuf Trize. Eie^isfitin^ 'Warrior AngeC Charity 
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austinchronicle.com AUGUST 8, 2014 the Austin chronicle 77 





VALL./:StUNi 


se^xces 

AUSTIN HARMONICA LESSONS 

Austin Harmonica Teacher. Michael Rubin 
michaelrubinharmonica.com 61 9-0761 

MUSXCXA^S 


Musicians Wanted 


Alternative rock band looking for musicians to round out 
lineup. Primary influences include : Radiohead, The 
Strokes, QOTSA, Fiona Apple, Zero 7, Interpol 
Looking for a vocalist, violinist, and a guitarist/ 
keyboardist, casualinterference.com (512) 632-8699 


Female vocalist Wanted 


mancea, proTessionaiiy-managea start up cover 
band playing a wide variety of material seeks young, 
professional, outgoing, female vocalist to sing lead. 
Ability to harmonize a huge plus. Must have great stage 
presence and confidence interacting with an audience. 
Send photo, demo and resume to: 
audition@austinmusicworks.com 


Episcopal Church seeks Worship Leader 


(jrace Episcopal in Georgetown is seeking a pianist/ 
worship leader for our 9.30 AM service at our second 
campus by Sun City. If possible, at an increased rate, 
we'd like the same person to lead our 5.00 PM service at 
the main campus on *Saturdays*. The successful 
applicant will be proficient on the piano (organ skills 
would be considered a plus, but by no means required), 
have significant repertoire to offer as preludes, 
offertories, and postiudes as well as be able to improvise 
during the liturgical actions. We use the Hymnal 1982 
along with the Renew Hymnal. Outside musical selections 
are acceptable pending approval by the priest. . Stipend 
is open to negotiation but will include Christmas Eve 
service at 5pm. Applicants with knowledge of Episcopal/ 
Anglican liturgy preferred, but it isn't mandatory. 


For further information or to schedule an audition 
contact Father Trey Garland. (512) 863-2068 
rector@graceepis.org 


Studio Time $1 8/hr. Professional recording studio with 
a relaxed atmosphere catering to unsigned bands and artists 
with a price you can afford. Listen to our demos at www. 
dreamharborstudios.com. For information and booking call: 
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78 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE AUGUSTS, 2014 austinchronicle.com 














CLUB LISTINGS 


FROM FRIDAY 


SPEAKEASY Continuums, DJ 5 Oh! 

SPIDER HOUSE BALLROOM Master 
Blaster Sound System w/ Kinski 
Gallo, Este Vato, (9:00) 

STRANGE BREW LOUNGE SIDE AMF 

SHOWCASE w/ Lauren Silva, Tamika 
Handy, Ben Cina, KP & the Boom Boom, 
Riders Against the StormJ> (6:00) ©© 
STUBB’S The Brothers Vinyl, MC 
Overlord, Vallejo (9:00) 

SWAN DIVE Courtlyn James, Kenna 
Danielle, Alana (8:00) 

SWEETWATER BCRR Silas Lowe, the 
Shady Rest Band (8:30) 

THE THIRSTY NICKEL Brian Wolfe 
(3:30), Street Kingz (8:30) 
THREADGILLS WORLD HQ Jerry Garcia 
Fest w/ Members of Wood & wire, 
Katie Holmes, Deadeye (9:00) O© 
TRAILER SPACE RECORDS Mighty 
Mountain, Yata-Garasu, Otonana Trio 
(7:00) ®© 

TRIPLE CROWN Joel Hofmann Band 
(6:00); Quiet Room, The Jocks, Attic 
Ted (10:00) 

UNCLE BILLY’S BREW & QUE Bobby 
Earl © 

WAKE THE DEAD COFFEEHOUSE A 

Motion to the Stars (10:00) 

WATER TROUGH AT LONE STAR COURT 

Moonlight SocialJ> (9:00) 

THE WHITE HORSE Gumbo Ce Soir, Nick 
Gaitan & the Umbrella Man, Roger 
Wallace (8:00) 


AMAYA’S TACO VILLAGE Johnny 
Gonzales (6:00) 

ANDERSON MILL TAVERN Jo Hell 
ANNEX AT CLUB 1808 Old Gray, 

Scowler, Old Problems © 

AUSTIN BEER GARDEN BREWING CO. 

Mike & the MoonpiesJ> (9:00) 
BADLANDS PanJomaJ), Texas Microphone 
Massacre, Lucid DementiaJ) (9:00) 

BARTON CREEK FARMERS MARKET 

Lynette Perkins, Doug Marsh 
(9:00am) © 

BARTON SPRINGS POOL Save Our 
Springs Alliance w/ AtashJ) (4:00) 

B.D. RILEY’S IRISH PUB Sean Orr (10:30) 
BEERLAND Famous Mortimers, Air 
Traffic Controllers, Art Acevedo, ST 
37, Naked Pictures (9:00) 

THE BELMONT John Pointer, Monte 
Montgomery (9:00) 

BOURBON GIRL Aaron Navarro (5:00), 
Mike ValliereJ) (9:00) 

BROKEN SPOKE Ben Rodgers, Dance 
Lessons, Dale Watson (6:00) 

C-BOY’S HEART & SOUL Snizz & 

Friends w/ Topaz, B. Perkins, J. Perdue, 
El John (10:00) 

CACTUS CAFE Alejandro Escovedo 
(8:30) O© 

THE CAPITAL GRILLE James Polk Trio 
( 6 : 00 ) 

CAROUSEL LOUNGE Love Vandals, 
the Go WowsJ>, New Mystery Girl, 
Blackcat88 (7:00) © 

CENTRAL MARKET NORTH Akina 
Adderley (6:30) © 


CENTRAL MARKET SOUTH Hot Texas 
Swing Band (6:30) © 

CHEATHAM STREET WAREHOUSE 

Johnny Jam 

CHEER UP CHARLIE’S Wet Beard 

Contest & Bearded Lady Drag Review 
w/ DJ Divorcee 

CHUGGIN’ MONKEY Chris Ray (2:00, 5:00) 

CONTINENTAL CLUB Mike Stinson, 
Wanda Jackson, Ruby Dee & the 
Snakehandlersi (10:00) O© 
CONTINENTAL CLUB GALLERY Hilary 
York (8:30), Mike Flanigin Trio w/ 
Johnny Moeller (10:30) 

CU-29 Hollie & Brian (10:00) 

DIZZY ROOSTER Mike ValllereJ) (5:00), 
Red Lady (8:30) 

DONN’S DEPOT Nash Hernandez 
Orchestra (8:00) 

EAST SEVENTH EATS The Flyin’ A’s (6:00) 

EAST SIDE SHOW ROOM Haun s MIN 
( 11 : 00 ) 

EDGE OF TOWN SALOON & GRILL 

Jennifer B & the Groove Kings 

EMPIRE CONTROL ROOM The Bandulus 
(8:00), Leisure, Frontier Live, Canvas 
Theory, Gift (8:00) © 

FADO IRISH PUB & RESTAURANT 

DJ Hexum 

FAIR BEAN COFFEE Amy Zamarripa 
Showcase w/ Josh Meadows (5:00) 
FIREHOUSE LOUNGE Boss Street Brass 
Band (10:00) 

FLAMINGO CANTINA Los Nahuatlatos, 

El Tule, Son de Rey © 

GINNY’S LITTLE LONGHORN SALOON 

James Leonard (6:00), Modern Don 
Juans (9:00) © 

GRUENE HALL Wheeler Brothers (9:00) © 
GUERO’S TACO BAR Paul Orta (2:30), 
M.C. & the Mystixs (6:30) 

HEB CAFE MUELLER The Staylyns (7:00) 

HOLE IN THE WALL Dead Love Club, 
Scorpio Rising, ChascaJ> © 

HOLY MOUNTAIN Magnet School, the 
Life & Times (9:00) © 

HOTEL VEGAS Jordan Moser, Sons of 
Villasana (8:00) ©, Mom Jeans, 
Midnight Masses, Those Howlings, 

Kay Odyssey (10:00) © 

KICK BUTT COFFEE Plnetree & Friends 
SongShow (8:00) © 

LAMBERTS George Irwin J), Treaty Oak, 
Mice & Rifles (9:30) 

LITTLE WOODROW’S Loose Leaf 
LITTLE WOODROW’S Tom Meny 
MERCER STREET DANCEHALL Bracken 
Hale (8:30) 

MOHAWK Gay Kiss, Bad Antics, 

Dwarves, OFF! w/ Dale Craven (7:00) 
o©, Inside: Bad Faith, Commoners, 
Dye, Impalers (9:00) © 

NEWORLDELI Juliana Murphy 
THE NOOK Luis Banuelos (5:00), Sonny 
Wolf (8:30) 

THE NORTH DOOR Girls Rock Camp 
Showcase (noon). Soundtrack Series 
w/ Ellen Stader, Mia Martina, Johnny 
Goudie (8:00) O 
ONE WORLD THEATRE Dave Koz 
Summer Horns w/ Mindy Abair, 

Gerald Albright (8:00) ©© 

ONE-2-ONE BAR Extreme Heat, Seu Jacinto, 
Morena Soul, Batuque Raiz (7:30) 
PARISH A Live One (9:00) 


POODIE’S HILLTOP ROADHOUSE Eric 
Tessmer (9:30) © 

RED 7 MissionsJ», Keeper, Def Rain, Young 
Pharoahs (9:00) ©, Lucky Loc, East 35, 
Sertified, Li’l J, Da Mafia 6ix (9:30) © 
REMEDY Nuevo Jazz Group (9:00) 

THE ROOST Johnny Walker’s Birthday 
w/ Omar & the Howlers, Soulhat, 
Pushmonkey/Podunk, All-Star 90’s 
Jam (8:00) O 

ROSS’ OLD AUSTIN CAFE Danny Fast 
FingersJ) (6:30) 

RUMI’S TAVERN SnakeBoy Johnson 

THE SAHARA LOUNGE Roland & the 
Roots Riddim, Zoumountchi (10:00) 
SATELLITE BISTRO & BAR Jackie 
Venson Trio (8:00) 

SAXON PUB Carson McHone (3:00); 

The Whiskey Sisters, Malford Milligan, 
Woody RussellJ> (7:00) 

THE SCOOT INN Helen Kelter Skelter, 
Continuums (9:00) © 

SHOOTERS BILLIARDS CEDAR PARK 
Minx (9:00) 

SKI SHORES CAFE Sherah & the Fine 
Souls © 

THE SKYLARK LOUNGE Soul Man Sam 
( 10 : 00 ) 

SPEAKEASY DJ Jericho One, Afrofreque, 
Sherah & the Fine Souls 

STRANGE BREW LOUNGE SIDE 

Que Pastas (10:00am); Randy 
Weeks, Jimmy LaFave, the Mooks, 
ChurchwoodJ> (7:00) © 

STUBB’S Casual Strangers, Mighty 
Mountain, My Empty Phantom (9:00) 
SWAN DIVE DJ B the Beat (10:00) 
SWEETWATER BCRR Devils & Dust, 
BandHaus (8:30) 

TAVERN ON MAIN Sally Allen & Katie 
Holmes (8:30) 

THE THIRSTY NICKEL Brian Wolfe 
(4:00), Guilty Pleasures (8:30) 
THREADGILL’S WORLD HQ Jerry Garcia 
Fest w/ Members of Wood & wire, 
Katie Holmes, Deadeye (9:00) © 
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Norman Base, Greedy Money World, 
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TRIPLE CROWN The Shady Rest Band, 
Rock Bottom String Band, Los Burros 
( 10 : 00 ) 

WATER TROUGH AT LONE STAR COURT 

The Sniffs (9:00) 

THE WHITE HORSE Dave Insley s 

Careless Smokers, Danny B. Harvey, 
Charlie Pierce & Earl Poole Ball (7:30) 




AMPED AUSTIN Johnny Reynolds (4:00) 

ANGEL’S ICEHOUSE Shawn Matthews © 
AUSTIN BEER GARDEN BREWING CO. 

Roger Wallace (4:00) 

AUSTIN JAVA CAFE & BAR Horti Llosa, 
Jordan Valentine, Jordan Moser © 
BAKER ST. PUB & GRILL Open Mic (7:00) 
BAT BAR Nick Ferguson (4:00), Selfless, 
May Sun & Mojo House (7:00) 

BB ROVERS Open Mic (7:00) © 

B.D. RILEY’S IRISH PUB Irish Tune 
Session, Joe Gee (9:00) 

BEERLAND The Midgetmen, New China, 
Jerkagram, Borzoi (9:00) © 


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austinchronicle.com AUGUST 8, 2014 the Austin chronicle 79 



















CLUB LISTINGS 


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BOURBON GIRL Luke Duhon (4:00), Clay 
Campania (9:00) 

CENTRAL MARKET NORTH Austin 
Steamers (6:30) © 

CHEER UP CHARLIE’S Carl Sagan 
Skate Shoes, Naked Pictures, Resent 
7” Release 

CHUGGIN’ MONKEY Jordan Dewbre 
(4:00), Jo Hell (9:00) 

CONTINENTAL CLUB Planet Casper 
Anniversary (3:30); The Wagoneers, 
Heybale! (7:30); Buck Owens Birthday 
Bash, HAAM Benefit w/ Austin 
Buckaroos, Johnny Falstaff, Bracken 
Hale, Bobby Marlar, Stephanie Marlar, 
Caroline Gnagy, Gina Lee Jamison, 
Lucas Hudgins, Jeff Salee, Kelly Willis, 
Jim Stringer, Monte Warden, Tracy Lynn, 
Janet Lynn, Graham Reynolds, Teri 
Joyce, Jeff Hughes, Lynette Wolf, Sarah 
Gayle Meech, Audrey Malone, Waylon 
Payne, Silvia Neal, Russ Varnell, Doug 
Kent, Roger Wallace, Matt Brooks & 
Kristen Davis, Charlie Hurtin’, Roy 
Heinrich, Jesse Harris, Kevin Russell, 
Mandy Marie Luke (8:00) © 
CONTINENTAL CLUB GALLERY Jon Dee 
Graham w/ Monte Warden, Dupree 
(8:30) 

COTTON CLUB Can’t Hardly Playboyz 
(7:00) © 

DIZZY ROOSTER GEM (5:00), Sonny 
Wolf (9:00) 

EDDIE V’S EDGEWATER GRILLE Kris 
Kimura (7:00) © 

FADO IRISH PUB & RESTAURANT 

Sean Orr 

FIREHOUSE LOUNGE The Love Leighs 
(9:00) 

FRIENDS J.T Coldfire, Blues Jam (5:30) 

GINNY’S LITTLE LONGHORN SALOON 

CSB w/ Dale Watson (4:00) 

GREEN PASTURES RESTAURANT 

Jacques Vilmain (11:00am) © 
GRUENE HALL Bret Graham (12:30), Hot 
Nut Riveters (5:00) © 

GUERO’S TACO BAR Blue Mist (3:00) 

HEB CAFE MUELLER Joshua Klaus 
(11:00am); Karen Goh (3:00) 

HOLE IN THE WALL Brushwlck Jack, 
Andrew Blanton © 

HOTEL VEGAS Detestados, Criaturas, 
Maailmanloppu, Kuudes Silma 
(9:00) © 

HOUSE WINE Justin Landers (6:00) 
LAMBERTS Ephraim Owens & Kevin 
Lovejoy (7:00), Ephraim Owens Duo 
(7:00) 

LITTLE WOODROW’S Tate Mayeux 
MARIA’S TACO XPRESS Rockin’ Gospel 
Project (noon) © 

MOHAWK Appalachian Dinosaur Exhibit, 
Mountain Sprout (9:00) © 

THE NORTH DOOR DEAD MTNS, 

Violinda, Little Science, Blending 
Dandelions (8:00) © 

NUTTY BROWN CAFE Java Jazz 
(11:00am) © 

THE OASIS The Brew (7:00) © 
ONE-2-ONE BAR Parker Smith, Hogan 
Sullivan Band, Justin Black & Big 
HeartJ) (6:00) © 

FOODIE’S HILLTOP ROADHOUSE Tessy 
Lou & the Shotgun Stars (4:00), Jon 
Napier Song Swap (7:30) © 


RED 7 Devin the Dude (8:00) © 

THE ROOST Les & the Funk Mob (8:00) 

THE SAHARA LOUNGE Upsy Daisies 
( 8 : 00 ) 

THE SANCTUARY JAM Fest, Junior Austin 
Musicians Benefit w/ Justin Black & 

Big HeartJ>|Mighty Mountain, Stephanie 
Daulong, Kalu Jamesji (6:00) 

SAXON PUB Jimmy & the Mustangs 
(3:00), Deann Rene, the Resentments 
(5:30), Libby Koch (10:30) 

SKI SHORES CAFE James Mason © 

THE SKYLARK LOUNGE Girls with 
Guitars (1:00) 

SPEAKEASY DJ Jericho One (9:00) 

SPIDER HOUSE BALLROOM Nextgang 
Live (9:00) 

STRANGE BREW LOUNGE SIDE 

Purgatory Players (11:00am) ©, 
Folkwine (2:00); These Fine Moments, 
Warren Hood & the Brewbirds (6:00) © 
STUBB’S The Durdens (11:00am) 

THE THIRSTY NICKEL J-Dub (4:00) 
TOM’S TABOOLEY Austin Friends of 
Traditional Music (2:00) © 

TRIPLE CROWN Open Mic 
THE WHITE HORSE Conjunto Los 
Pinkys (5:00); the Love Leighs, Soul 
Supporters (9:00), Conjunto Los 
Pinl^s, Sock Hop (9:00) 

ZED’S Jeff Lofton (1:00) 




ACL LIVE AT THE MOODY THEATER 

Wine Down w/ Dawn & Hawkes (5:00) 
BAT BAR Spectra, Hip Hop (7:00) 

B.D. RILEY’S IRISH PUB Open MIc (8:00) 
BEERLAND Rock & Roll Karaoke (9:00) 
BOURBON GIRL Jordan Dewbre (5:00), 
Sonny Wolf (9:00) 

BUNGALOW Chelsea Barbo (4:00) 
CHEATHAM STREET WAREHOUSE 
Sterling Finlay 

CHEZ ZEE Rich Demarco (6:30) © 
CHUGGIN’ MONKEY Chris Ray (5:00), 
Mike V & the Lonestar Rejects (9:00) 

CONTINENTAL CLUB Miss Julia & the 
Cruzers (6:30), Dale Watson & His 
Lone Stars (10:00) 

CONTINENTAL CLUB GALLERY Church 
on Monday, Kalu Jamesji (8:30) 

DIVE BAR Jazz Fury w/ John Mills (7:00) 
DIZZY ROOSTER Vinnie Lu Duo (5:00), 
Red Lady (9:00) 

THE DOGWOOD Aaron Navarro (9:00) 

DONN’S DEPOT Chris Gage 
EDDIE V’S EDGEWATER GRILLE Kris 
Kimura (7:00) © 

FIREHOUSE LOUNGE AvI Hartman (5:00) 
FRIENDS Dave Scher Trio (6:00), Eric 
Tessmer (9:30) 

HOLE IN THE WALL Tex Smith, Josh 
Buckley, Union Specific 
HOLY MOUNTAIN Curbside Jones, 
Clemitsji, Rafael Vigilantez, Dark 
Time Sunshine (9:00) © 

HOTEL VEGAS nnabelle Chairlegs, DJs 
Jason McNeely & Sara 0 
HYDE PARK THEATRE Eddy Hobizal 
(7:30) © 

LA PALAPA Baby Dallas 


LONGBRANCH INN Communist Radio 
(9:00) 

MIDWAY FIELD HOUSE Antone’s Blue 
Monday Band w/ Derek O’Brien, Riley 
Osbourn (6:00) 

MOHAWK Roger Sellers, Alec Ounsworth, 
Clap Your Hands Say Yeah (6:30) 
o©, Inside: Dreamend, Casket Girls 
( 10 : 00 ) © 

MOZART’S COFFEE ROASTERS 

John Wilson © 

NASTY’S DJ Mel 

NEWORLDELI Open Mic w/ Hudson 
James (5:30) 

ONE-2-ONE BAR Ray Prim, Tom Meny, 
Bentli (7:00); Sauce (9:00) © 

POODIE’S HILLTOP ROADHOUSE Hubble 
Lou (4:00) ©, Texas Songwriters w/ 
WC Jamesom (6:30) © 

RAY BENSON’S RATTLE INN Brennen 
Leigh (9:00) 

RED 7 Casual Strangers, the Black Kids 
(9:00) © 

RILEY’S TAVERN Singer-Songwriter 
Showcase w/ John Whipple (9:00) 

THE ROOST W.C. Clark, Roxy RocaJ), 
Carson Alexander (6:00) 

THE SAHARA LOUNGE Salsa w/ Raul 
Ramirez 

SAXON PUB The Motts (6:00), 
Lonelyland, the Leavers (8:30) 

THE SCOOT INN Other Lovers (9:00) 

STRANGE BREW LOUNGE SIDE Grouchy 
Like Riley, Wrenfro (6:00) © 

TRIPLE CROWN Manzy Lowry (6:00), 
Chief & the Doomsday Device (9:00) 

THE WHITE HORSE Hot Nut Riveters, 
Rollfast Ramblers, Rosie & the 
Ramblers (8:00) 


BAT BAR Nick Ferguson (4:00); Paper 
Government, Calloway Trio (7:00) 

B.D. RILEY’S IRISH PUB Suzanne Smith 
(7:00) 

BEERLAND Lesser Beings, Basketball 
Shorts, Prince (9:00) 

BOURBON GIRL The REEN (5:00), Aaron 
Navarro (9:00) 

BROKEN SPOKE Armadillo Road, 

Weldon Henson (6:00) 

C-BOY’S HEART & SOUL Atlas Malor, 
Indimaj (7:30) 

CAROUSEL LOUNGE Suttree (7:00) 

CHEATHAM STREET WAREHOUSE Blue 
Water Highway, Haley Cole 

CHUGGIN’ MONKEY Mark Chandler 
(5:00), Sonny Wolf (9:00) 

CONTINENTAL CLUB Toni Price (6:00), 
Alejandro Escovedo, Barfield (10:30) 

CONTINENTAL CLUB GALLERY James 
McMurtry, Ephraim Owens Experience 
(8:30) 

DIZZY ROOSTER Southbound Duo 
(5:00), Tish & Misbehavin’ (9:00) 

THE DOGWOOD Colt Landon Baker (7:00) 

DONN’S DEPOT Donn & the Station 
Masters 

THE DRAG BAR Open Mic w/ Lucy (9:00) 

EAST SIDE SHOW ROOM DJ Gatsby 
( 10 : 00 ) 

EDDIE V’S EDGEWATER GRILLE Mark 
Goodwin (7:00) © 


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80 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE AUGUSTS, 2014 austinchronicle.com 











CLUB LISTINGS 


ELEPHANT ROOM Stanley Smith & 
Lauren Gurgiolo (6:00) 

ELYSIUM Eurotrash (10:00) 

FIREHOUSE LOUNGE Eve & the Exiles 
(9:00) 

FRIENDS Erin Jaimes, Clay Compania 
(7:30) 

HALCYON Dwight Smith (10:00) ©® 
HOLE IN THE WALL Sons of Hippies, 

Izzy Cox, John Doe Stompers © 
HOTEL VEGAS Panoramas, Lochness 
Mobsters, Sweet Spirit, Beach Day 
(9:00) © 

LA PALAPA Baby Dallas 
LAMBERTS Luis Banuelos (7:30) 

LONG CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING 
ARTS Maxwell O© 

MOHAWK BYOV.INYL Happy Hour 
(5:00), Phantom Fox, the Harms, 
Mellowphant (8:00) 

NEWORLDELI Eggjam 
THE NORTH DOOR Grim Screening w/ 
Horne & Holt (7:30) 

ONE-2-ONE BAR the Funk Mob (7:00), 
The Drakes (8:00) 

PATSY’S CAFE Jane Bond & Matt Giles 
POODIE’S HILLTOP ROADHOUSE 

Stephen K. Morris (6:00) ®, Ru 
Colean (4:00), Kern Watts (6:00) © 
RAY BENSON’S RATTLE INN George 
Devore’s Backstage Jam (9:00) 

RED 7 New Empire, Famous Last Words, 
Red Jumpsuit Apparatus, Hawthorne 
Heights (6:00) O©, Against the 
Archaic, Stages & Stereos, Heartist, 
Our Last Night, Set It Off (6:00) © 
THE ROOST Songwriter Open Mic 
Showcase (8:00) 

THE SAHARA LOUNGE Hooka Hey 
( 8 : 00 ) © 

SAXON PUB David Grissom (6:00), 
Russell Beach & the Stepchildren, 
Ryan E. Morris, Julie Nolen (8:00) 

THE SKYLARK LOUNGE Dickie Lee 
Erwin (8:00) 

SPEAKEASY Off Beat Path (9:00) 

SPIDER HOUSE BALLROOM Austin 
Poetry Slam, Austin Mic Exchange, 
Austin Poetry Slam (7:00), Austin Mic 
Exchange (11:00) 

STRANGE BREW LOUNGE SIDE Durawa 
(6:00) ©, Johnny Goudie w/ Adam 
Sultan, Elizabeth McQueen, Salim 
Nourallah & Alex Dezen (8:00) ©© 

SWEETWATER BCRR Comedy Showcase 
( 10 : 00 ) 

THE THIRSTY NICKEL The Bomb Squad 
(9:00) 

TRAILER SPACE RECORDS Defeat the 
Hero, Turncloak, Dull (7:00) ©© 
TRIPLE CROWN Nate Guthrie (6:00); 

Talk Radio, 4orms, Marcus Morales & 
the Washboard Machine (9:00) 
UNCLE BILLY’S BREW & QUE Jimmie 
Dreams ©O 

THE WHITE HORSE Matt Downing’s 
Bluegrass Explosion, Austin 
Steamers, Robert Banta (8:00) 
Z’TEJAS Blue Mist (6:00) 


290 WEST BAR & GRILL Open Mic 
(8:45) 

AUSTIN ALE HOUSE Chase GassawayJ) 
( 6 : 00 ) 

AMAYA’S TACO VILLAGE Johnny 
Gonzales (6:00) 

AUSTIN BEER GARDEN BREWING CO. 

Jimmy & the Mustangs (8:30) 

BAT BAR Raul Adrian Ochoa (4:00); 
Calloway & Christina, Red Lady (7:00) 

B.D. RILEY’S IRISH PUB C.K. Bailey 
( 10 : 00 ) 

BEERLAND 1992, Seaholm ElectricJ>, 
Crocodile Tears (9:00) © 

BOURBON GIRL Jessica Parke (5:00), 
Charlie Murphy (9:00) 

BROKEN SPOKE T. Jarrod Bonta, Dance 
Lessons, Mike & the MoonpiesJ) 
( 6 : 00 ) 

CACTUS CAFE Robynn Shayne (8:30) 

©o 

THE CAPITAL GRILLE James Polk Trio 
( 6 : 00 ) 

CAROUSEL LOUNGE Tiny Purple Fishes 
(9:00) 

CHEATHAM STREET WAREHOUSE Kent 
Finlay’s Songwriters Circle (11:00) 
CHUGGIN’ MONKEY The Goodz (5:00), 
Mama Said (9:00) 


CONTINENTAL CLUB Hot Club of 
Cowtown (6:30), The Everydudes, 
James McMurtry (10:00) 
CONTINENTAL CLUB GALLERY Matt 
Hubbard Trio (8:30); Trube, Farrell & 
Sniz (10:30) 

DIZZY ROOSTER Chris Ray (5:00), Sean 
Evan & His Very Handsome Band (9:00) 
DONN’S DEPOT Frank & the Honky-Tonk 
Doctors 

EDDIE V’S EDGEWATER GRILLE James 
Speer (7:00) © 

ELEPHANT ROOM Jazz Pharoahs (6:00) 

EMPIRE CONTROL ROOM Russ Liquid 
(10:00) © 

FIREHOUSE LOUNGE Austin Music 
Showcase, Open Mic (8:00) 
FLAMINGO CANTINA Don ChanI (8:30) 
FREDA’S SEAFOOD GRILLE Rich 
Demarco (5:00) © 

FRIENDS Widgeon Holland (5:00); 

Swamp Sauce, JT Coldfire (8:00) 
GINNY’S LITTLE LONGHORN SALOON 
Traci Lynn, Danny Britt & Marvin 
Dykhuis (8:00) 

GRUENE HALL The Georges (7:00) ©, 
Two Tons of Steel (8:30) ® 

GUERO’S TACO BAR KDRP Radio Show 
( 6 : 00 ) 

HOLE IN THE WALL Adam Kobetich & 
Susquehanna Hat Company, Colton 
Cerny & the Trespassers 
HOTEL VEGAS Dick Sexxx, Cumstain (9:00) 
IGUANA GRILL Blue Steel w/ Leslie 
Redden (7:00) 

LAMBERTS Jitterbug Vipers (7:00) 
MERCER STREET DANCEHALL Open 
Mic w/ Nic Gatwood (7:30) 

MOHAWK Lemuria, the Both (7:00) 
o©, Some Say Leland, Painted 
Redstarts, Jack Wilson (10:00) 
ONE-2-ONE BAR Don Harvey & A Is Red, 
Black Red Black, 80H ProjectJ> (6:30) 
PARISH Mike Dillon, Matt Chamberlain, 
Brad Houser, Critters Buggin’ (9:00) 

o© 

POODIE’S HILLTOP ROADHOUSE Open 
Mic w/ BB Morse (8:00) © 

REALE’S PIZZA & CAFE “Frankly ” 
Singing w/ Ken Kruse (6:30) 

THE ROOST The Peterson Brothers 
(6:30), Chubby Knuckle Choir, Carson 
Alexander (8:30) 

THE SAHARA LOUNGE Rama Committee, 
Sally Crewe, Scan Hopper (9:00) 
SAM’S TOWN POINT Open Blues Jam 
w/ Breck English (8:40) 

SAXON PUB Miss Lavelle White (6:00), 
Charlie Mars, Shawn Pander J> (9:00) © 
THE SCOOT INN Claire Puckett, Mary 
Bryce, Grace Park (8:30) 
SHERLOCK’S BAKER ST. PUB & GRILL 
Encore 

THE SKYLARK LOUNGE Chris Devore 
( 8 : 00 ) 

SPEAKEASY Texissippi Two, DJ Henry -i- 
the Invisibles 

SPIDER HOUSE BALLROOM 365colours, 
Darkbird, the Coattails (8:00) © 
STRANGE BREW LOUNGE SIDE Chris 
Gage, John Evans, Jason James 
( 6 : 00 ) © 

THE THIRSTY NICKEL Jo Hell (9:00) 
TRIPLE CROWN Grant Ewing (6:00); 

Drive on, Mak, the Red Direct, 
Blackwater Revival (9:00) © 

WATER TROUGH AT LONE STAR COURT 
Meggan Carney (6:00) 

THE WHITE HORSE Robert Allan 
Caldwell, the Stargazers, Amanda 
Cevallos, Carson McHone (6:00) 
Z’TEJAS Stephen Doster, Randy Weeks, 
Bill Carter (6:00) 

ZILKER PARK Blues on the Green w/ 
Shinyribs (8:00) 


ACL LIVE AT THE MOODY THEATER 

Taping: Thao Nguyen & the Get Down 
Stay Down (6:30) O© 

AMAYA’S TACO VILLAGE Johnny 
Gonzales (6:00) 

AUSTIN 360 AMPHITHEATER AT 

CIRCUIT OF THE AMERICAS Dillinger 
Escape Plan, Soundgarden, Nine Inch 
Nails o© 

AUSTIN ROLLER RINK The Red Tent, 
Worthless, the Clumps, Beat DollsJ>, 
Fulcrum Lake (9:00) © 

B.D. RILEY’S IRISH PUB Kristen Gibbs 
( 8 : 00 ) 


BEERLAND Death of Abacus, Demonic 
Supremacy, Bloodgeon, Blood Royale 
(9:00) © 

BOURBON GIRL Chris Ray (5:00), Clay 
Compania (9:00) 

BROKEN SPOKE Tony Harrison, Dance 
Lessons, Jesse Dayton J> (6:00) 

BUZZ MILL COFFEE Bob Cheevers 
C-BOY’S HEART & SOUL Paul Oscher 
( 6 : 00 ) 

THE CAPITAL GRILLE James Polk Trio 
( 6 : 00 ) 

CAROUSEL LOUNGE No Cattle, 

Invincible Czars (7:00) 

CENTRAL MARKET NORTH Long Horn 
(6:30) © 

CENTRAL MARKET SOUTH Andre 
Hayward (6:30) © 

CHEATHAM STREET WAREHOUSE 

Christian Carroll, Adam Carroll (9:00) 
CHUGGIN’ MONKEY John Chavez (5:00), 
Tish & Misbehavin’ (9:00) 

CONTINENTAL CLUB Shurman (6:30), 
Dave Alvin & Phil Alvin, Two Hoots & a 
Holler (10:00) O© 

CONTINENTAL CLUB GALLERY Llv 

Meuller, Tameca Jones (8:30) 

DIRTY DOG BAR thydevourer. Dead Last, 
the dialectic (8:00) © 

DIZZY ROOSTER Phil Luna (4:30), 

Sonny Wolf (9:30) 

DONN’S DEPOT Murphy’s Inlaws 
THE DRAG BAR Sanchez Mac (9:00) 
EMPIRE CONTROL ROOM Persyce, 
Chakeeta B, KB the Boo BonicJ>, Lil 
Debbie (9:00) © 

FIREHOUSE LOUNGE Hard Road Trio 
( 10 : 00 ) 

FLAMINGO CANTINA Young Costello, Sol 
Tribe, Radio La Chusma (9:00) © 

FREDA’S SEAFOOD GRILLE Rich 
Demarco (5:00) © 

GIDDY UPS Open Mic (8:00) 

GINNY’S LITTLE LONGHORN SALOON 
Starlings, TN (6:00), Alvin Crow (9:00) 
GRUENE HALL Chris Isaak ©© 
GUERO’S TACO BAR The FabsJ» (6:30) 
HEB CAFE MUELLER Mark CampbellJ) 
( 6 : 00 ) 

HOLE IN THE WALL Electric Friends, 
Those Nights, Harvest Thieves 
HOLY MOUNTAIN Hello Caller J), the 
Tragic Thrills, Air Traffic Controllers 
(9:00) © 

HOTEL VEGAS Street Arabs, Justin 
Fallen & the Angels, Greg Mullen & 
the Cosmic American Band (9:00) 

IRIE BEAN COFFEE BAR Open Mic w/ 
Lisa Kettyle (6:00) © 

MERCER STREET DANCEHALL Doug 
Moreland & the Flying Armadillos (7:30) 
MOHAWK El Campo, Ruby Jane & 

Eclectic Tuba (9:00) © 

NEWORLDELI Bluegrass Open Mic w/ 
Eddie Collins 

THE NOOK Johnny Reynolds, Clint 
Manning (5:00) 

ONE WORLD THEATRE John Mayall 

( 8 : 00 ) O©© 

PARISH Kilowatts (10:00) © 

POODIE’S HILLTOP ROADHOUSE Ted 

Long (6:00); James Byron (6:30), 
Johnson (8:30) © 

RED 7 Luicidal (9:00) © 

THE ROOST Ullrich Ellison, Alex Ruiz & the 
Night Mothers, American Gypsy (8:00) 
RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE Jeff 
Lofton (6:30) 

THE SAHARA LOUNGE Adarmo (7:00) 
SATELLITE BISTRO & BAR Danielle 
Reich (7:30) 

SAXON PUB Eightysixxed (6:00) 

THE SCOOT INN Matt Hines, Peter 
Shults, Harrison Anderson (8:30) 

STRANGE BREW LOUNGE SIDE Jenny 
Reynolds, Lee Barber & the Broken 
Cup (6:00) © 

SWAN DIVE Rambler Rose (10:00) 

THE THIRSTY NICKEL Mike ValllereJ) 
(4:00), Lloyd Wright & Twister ATX 
(8:30) 

TRIPLE CROWN Loretta’s .22 (6:00); 
Loose Leaf, Mama K. & the Shades 
( 10 : 00 ) 

WATER TROUGH AT LONE STAR COURT 

Jeremy StedingJ> (6:00) 

THE WHITE HORSE Silas Lowe, 
FingerpistolJ>, Them Duqaines 
WINFLO OSTERIA BettySoo 
Z’TEJAS The Brew (6:00) 


ALL AGES VENUE ® ROADSHOW O RECOMMENDED J) HEAR MUSIC ONLINE 



FRI,AUG.8 6-8PM DAVID MADEWELL 

8-9PM DANCE LESSONS 

,3,PM GABY P. NUNN 

SAT, AUG. 9 6-8PM BEN RODGERS 8-9PM dance lessons 

,30PM DALE WATSON 

TUE, AUG. 12 6-8PM ARMADILLO ROAD 

a. 3PM WELDON HENSON 

WED, AUG. 13 6-8PM TI RONTA 8-9PM dance lessons 

PPM MIKE a THE MOONPIES 


rPOOBIES^ 


f" M® ® A® 


LIVE MUSIC EVERY DAV OF THE WEEK 

Friday August 8 

TEJAS BROTHERS 

Saturday August 9 

ERIC TESSMER BAND 

Monday August 11 

^’^'SONCWRITEIU >HOWCASE’«-’«- 

W C Jameson hosts Chuck Hawthorne I 
Friday August 15 

MONTV BVROM & 

The Road Pilots 

Visit our website for full music calendar 
HWY 71W SPICEWOOD.TX 512.264.0318. 
V * FREE Wl-Fl * P00B1ES.NET * X 


Audio by 

Beatles Tribute 


Butch Hanceck 


Bee Gees Scngbcok 

Tickets & Schedule at 
www.StrangeBrew LoungeSide.com 


Cole Washburn 6 p James Anthony Johnson 
& Brent Guilbault - Song Swap sp 
Anthony Da Costa iod 


Friday August 8th 


Austin Music Foundation Showcase 6-12 

Lauren Silva, Tannika Handy, Ben Cina, 

KP &The Boonn Boonn, 

Riders Against the Stornn 


Saturday Auaust 9th 


Que Pastas (Kids Show 10a) 
Randy Weeks sp Jimmy LaFave 7 p 
The Mooks 9 p Churchwood i 0 : 30 p 


Sunday Auaust 10th 


Gospel Brunch iia-ip 
Folkwine 2p These Fine Moments 6 p 

Warren Hood &The Brewbirds 8pm 


Monday August 1 1 th 


Grouchy Like Riley 6p Wrenfro 8p 


Tuesday August 1 2th 


DURAWA 6 p Johnny Goudie w/ Adam 
Sultan, Elizabeth McQueen 8 p 
Salim Nourallah & Alex Dezen lOp 


Chris Gage 60th Birthday Bash 6p 

John Evans Band 8 p Jason Jannes lOp 


5326 Manchaca Rd, Austin, TX 78745 
512-828-7636 


1504 East 

.Sfegth St., 


f 512.243.6118 




THUUSDAV, AUGUST 7 
ROOTS JAM 

Koiisdbj^ THE SNIFFS 10pm 

n^IDAY, AUGUST 8 On Ouh Ouidooh fijoUo $iaqsi 

THE DEL-VIPERS 10pm 
THE DAMN TIMES 11pm 
CITY LIFE 11:30pm 
BORZOI 12am 


SATUI^OAVj AUGUS I OjVi Ouddooh ^aHo Siaqs. 

1992 930pm 

GREENBEARD 10:30pm 
SUCKA PLEASE 11pm 
FRANCIS BRADY 11:30pm 

SUNDAY, AUGUST 10 
WESTERN SWING DANCING 
ijJiih WILKINSON’S QUARTET 9pm 




NO COVER 

PRIDAT- 8/8 

NEVER TOO OLD 

' ■ 8 ATDBBAY- 8/9 

JENNIFER 
©THE groove!. 

j - T 0 E 8 BAT- 8/12 ■ 

ROGRZN* STEVE 
^ZCARAONZU^ 

— -FHIBAT-- 8/15 

SPILLED WKZSREV 

8 AT 0 BBAT- 8/16 

GLEN COLLZNS 


15601 VISION OH. ★ 251-9358 


austinchronicle.com AUGUST 8, 2014 the Austin chronicle 81 


















COMIX 




I am a drummer in a good hand, hut we can never get 
any gigs. We don’t do anything hut rehearse. Cluhs say 
1 they have too many hands already or that we are not the 

I XCyCK ^ l\oWi right style of music (progressive rock). When we do get a 

gig, it is always late at night when none of our friends can 
come to the show (we are all in our 30s and our friends 
have jobs), and usually the cluhs we get hooked at don’t have any turnout anyway so there’s 
no chance of building a following. What is your advice on getting good gigs? 


- Anonymous 


Anonymous, I am going to do you a solid. Even though you have robbed me of about 
half my word count with your goddamned sad-sack mewling, I will nonetheless try to take 
the high road and answer your question sincerely even though every fiber of my being 
is in revolt against the thought. Here’s my advice: If you want to start getting good gigs, 
stop thinking like a drummer and start thinking like a club owner. No, that doesn’t mean 
you need to find a young, hot girlfriend and develop a cocaine addiction. What you need 
to do is to realize that most live music club owners really do love music - so much, in fact, 
that they’re willing to spend almost all their time dealing with musicians. No, seriously. 
Dealing with the beer truck guy takes maybe two minutes. Ditto on the liquor reps. TABC 
can be a huge time suck, but even they pale in comparison to the black hole of the sensi- 
tive musician’s fragile ego. Don’t be that guy. If you want to be a working musician, you 
have to do what every other worker does for his employer: You have to solve problems 
instead of creating them. How do you solve the problem of an empty club with no alcohol 
sales? A club full of wealthy binge drinkers. You make that happen and you’re the club 
owner’s best friend. It’s really that simple. Well, actually, it’s exceedingly hard - especially 
in a town that is full of really great clubs and fucking spectacular bands, but if you want 
to be a working musician, that’s your job. And maybe you don’t want to do what it takes 

to make that happen. That’s OK. Really. It’s OK. Have a 

band. Play music. Enjoy it. Don’t obsess about whether 
you’re successful, obsess about your music. Nerd the 
fuck out. Invite your friends to nerd out with you. Ask 
them to bring some beer. Invite the neighbors and have 
a fucking gig. Once you’re good at that you can move on 
to bigger venues. 


•SHOrtlM 


TINIEST BAR TEXAS 

You: Female, long brown hair, 5'8", 
skirt, walking w/ friend on Thurs- 
day, Tiniest Bar in Texas, 2:30pm. 
Me: Male, tall, that owns smaller 
bar =). Would like to meet again! 
When: Thursday, July 17, 2014. 
Where: Tiniest Bar in Texas. You: 
Woman. Me: Man. #900001 


NEED SOME ADVICE FROM THE LUV DOC? 

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO luvdoc@austinchronicle.com 



DATE 

LOC^ 


Austin Chronicle Dating is the simpl^sr ’wily 
to meet ne’w people near yon. Try it free at; 
atistinckronicleM oivabo u twe. com 


rawf EE1> BY 

□ ||prwabQutiw, 










CAN Vou IPENTIFV WHICH OF THE FOUOWINO 
ARE COMSIDERED FIRST ArOENDmENT (EIGHTS 
ANP WHICH AREN^r, ACCORDING TO U.S. COURTS f 


uNuiNirep MONEY Given 
TO Political campaigns BY 

COAPOAATIONS AND SHADOWY 
INTEREST GROUPS 




A CORPORATION'S RELIGIOUS 

beliefs as expressed 

THROUGH INSURANCE BENEFITS 
PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY 



© 


FLORIDA DOCTORS INFORMING 
PATIENTS OF THE RISKS OF 
KEEPING FIREARMS IN A HOME 
WITH CHILDREN 





undercover VIDEOS MADE BY 
journalists REVEALING 
ANIMAL CRUELTY AND OTHER 

illegal behavior at factory 



/A'I'IIS 'X.NSBV OiD ONV d 3193 XOtid 3 »V fl iV :Sb 3 MSNI^ 

Sonenssff 


2 ! 

o 

CO 


MR. SMARTY PANTS KNOWS 

Every day, at the end of the workday in China, they piay the 
Kenny G song, ^^Going Home,^’ to encourage workers to go home. 

An apron was originally called a napron. If you go all the way back 
to Latin, you can trace the roots of “apron” to the word “mappa” 
which meant both tablecloth and map because if you spread 
a large map out on a table, it’s a lot like a tablecloth. 

^^Weird^^ Ai Yankovic has parodied or covered more than 
30 members of the Rock and Roii Haii of Fame. 

According to the Journal of Climate, almost no Americans die 
from lightning strikes anymore. But in the first half of the 20th 
century, about 400 people were killed by lightning annually. 

In 2013, there were 23 such deaths. 

Of the 7.1 biiiion peopie iiving in 2013, 2.7 biiiion - 38% - 
had Internet access. 



At left is information that Mr. 
Smarty Pants read in a book, a 
magazine, or the newspaper; 
heard on the radio; saw on tele- 
vision; or overheard at a party. 
Got facts? Write to Mr. Smarty 
Pants at the Chronicle, or email 
mrpants@austinchronicle.com. 


82 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE AUGUSTS, 2014 austinchronicle.com 











CASTING 



a new reality TV show FOR A 
MAJOR CABLE 


NETWORK** Looking for 
people ages 20s -30s who are 
new to Austin or planning to 
relocate there soon. We are 
an established Los Angeles- 
based production company. 
Please email 

demiloca@yahoo.com up to 
(3) photos and a brief 
introduction (name, age, 
occupation/career goals, 
marital status, etc.), 
including any relevant links. 


COMPUTER/ 
TECHNICAL 

AGILE PROJECT LEAD 

for Austin office. Technical 
lead on Agile projects for 
development of mobile and 
web applications for consumer 
goods industry. Send resume 
to RW3 Technologies Inc., Attn: 
Winston Williams, P.O. Box 
685061, Austin, TX 78768. 



Construction Field Engineer 

With at least 5 years' 

experience 

Must be able to read 

blueprints and run a Total 

Station 

For Vertical & Horizontal 
Control, 

Anchor bolt placement, and 
data collection 
In Austin-Central Texas Area 
NO SURVEYORS 
Call 214-546-2779 or send 
resume to bharris@r-o.com 


SENIOR SOFTWARE 
ARCHITECT 

Gemalto, Inc. is recruiting for 
the Senior Software Architect 
position in Austin, TX to create, 
modify, and test server-side 
software requirements; assist 
with requirement analysis, 
system design, and task and 
resource management; and 
evaluate and ensure quality 
of product. Applicants should 
mail resume referencing Job 
Code 516477 to: Gemalto, Inc., 
Attn: HR, 9442 Capitol of Texas 
Highway N., Plaza II, Ste. 400, 
Austin, TX 78759 


SOFTWARE ENGINEER 

Austin, TX. MS in CS or rltd. 

-I- 1 yr exp in job offered or rltd. 
Develop/optimize mobile app. 
Apply: lnsidersReferral.com, 
Inc. d/b/a Jobs2Careers, 
hr@jobs2careers.com 


EDUCATION 

AIRLINE CAREERS AIRLINE 
CAREERS begin here -Get 
trained as FAA certified Avia- 
tion Technician. Financial aid 
for qualified students. Housing 
and Job placement assistance. 
Call Aviation Institute of 
Maintenance 800-725-1563 
(AAN CAN) 


MAKEUP ARTISTS 

EARN $500 A DAY as Airbrush 
Media Makeup Artist 
For Ads, TV, Film, Fashion. One 
Week Course 

Train & Build Portfolio. 15% 

OFF TUITION 

AwardMakeupSchool.com 818- 
980-2119 (AAN CAN) 


WORK STUDY 

Africa, Brazil Work/Study! 
Change the lives of others 
and create a sustainable future. 
1, 6, 9, 18 month programs 
available. Apply now! 
www.OneWorldCenter.org 
269.591.0518 info@OneWorld- 
Center.org (AAN CAN) 


GENERAL 


OfflCE/CLERICAL 


■ELECTRICIANS 


Journeyman electricians 
needed immediately, $25-$30/ 
hr. 512-529-6987 
clkraatz@aol.com 


KIDS ENTERTAINERS Will 
Train $10/HR-$70/HR 
Must be Avail All Wknd Hrs 
&OWN Trans (18 or older) 
toll free 888-458-7247 
AmazingTexasTwisters.com 


MAILERS $1 ,000 WEEKLY!! 
MAILING BROCHURES 
From Home. Helping home 
workers since 2001 . Genuine 
Opportunity. No Experience 
required. Start Immediately 
www.mailingmembers.com 
(AAN CAN) 


lDMIN. ASSISTANT 


Strong administrative & 
communication skills 
needed. Emphasis on 
scheduling & preparing 
estimates. Report directly to 
VP 972-880-5171 
kelly@fsiconstruction.com 


Scheduling travel and 
expense reporting. 
Coordination of offsite 
meetings, i.e. booking 
rooms, developing agendas, 
send your cover letter and 
salary expectations to: 
esoun68@gmail.com 



Would you like to work 
online from Home and get 
paid? We are glad to offer 
you a job position with Ritzo 
Fabrics Inc and You do not 
need to have an Office and 
this certainly will not affect 
your present job. Email your 
resume:donald.bernier715@ 
yahoo.com 

donald.bernier715@yahoo.co 

m 


PHONE ACTRESSES From 
Home 

Must have dedicated land line 
And great voice. 21 -i- 
Up to $1 8 per hour. Flex HRS./ 
most Wknds 

1-800-403-7772 Lipservice.net 
(AAN CAN) 


MEDICAL 


Licensed RN in the state of 
Texas 

-Clinical Operation 
Management experience a 
must 

-Hospice experience 
preferred 

-Ability to travel a must 
Apply: www.harborhcs.com 


RN- PACU 


We are looking for a nurse 
who has PACU and 
operating room experience. 


briana@westlakeplasticsurg 

ery.com 


PROFESSIONAL 

ACCOUNTING ASSISTANT 

The Austin Chronicle is 
currently taking applications 
for an Accounting Assistant. 

Job responsibilities include: 

* AR, AP, payroll, daily deposit 
reports and other bookkeeping 
functions 

* Entering payments in billing 
system software 

* Reconciling account 
discrepancies 

* Creating and maintaining 
spreadsheets in Excel and 
Open Office 

* Communicating with clients 
and vendors 

* Processing new hire 
paperwork 

* Administering employee 
insurance benefits 

* Managing front desk staff 
of two 

Requirements: 

* Prior accounting or 
bookkeeping experience 

* Proficiency with Excel and 
Word 

* Excellent organizational skills 
and superior attention to detail 
Position is full-time, 9am- 
5:30pm Monday through Friday 
Paid vacations and holidays, 
health/dental/vision coverage, 
and 401 (k) program 

The Austin Chronicle is an 
Equal Opportunity Employer 
Email resume and cover 
letter to 

lfranklin@austinchonicle.com 



A \ Senior Care 

V J ' ' ‘ "V 


COTTONWOOD CREEK 
NURSING & REHABILITATION 
CENTER 



CURRENT JOB OPENINGS 


Charge Nurse - LVN/RN 
Certified Nurse Aide 
Hospitality Aide 


Social Services Director 
Business Office Manager 

AA/EEO/M/F/D/V 


APPLY 

ONLINE 


. www.seniorcarecentersltc.com 

Click on Careers on the top tab. 
Select Career Opportunities on the left menu. 


1500 Cottonwood Creek Trail, Cedar Park ( 512 ) 259-4259 



Senior Care 

- \ ^ I K y 


GRACY WOODS 
LIVING CENTER 

CURRENT JOB OPENINGS 


Certified Nurse Aides 
Director of Business Development 
Wellness/Life Enrichment Assistant aa/eeo/m/f/d/v 



www.seniorcarecentersltc.com 

Click on Careers on the top tab. 
Select Career Opportunities on the left menu. 


12021 Metric Blvd., Austin ( 512 ) 228-3300 


ACCOUNnNGASSISlANl 


The Austin Chronicle is currently taking 
applications for an Accounting Assistant. 

Job responsibilities include; 

* AR, AP, payroll, daily deposit reports and other 

bookkeeping functions 

* Entering payments in billing system software 

* Reconciling account discrepancies 

* Creating and maintaining spreadsheets in Excel and 

Open Office 

* Communicating with clients and vendors 

* Processing new hire paperwork 

* Administering employee insurance benefits 

* Managing front desk staff of two 

Requirements; 

* Prior accounting or bookkeeping experience 

* Proficiency with Excel and Word 

* Excellent organizational skills and superior 

attention to detail 

Position is full-time, 9am-5:30pm 
Monday through Friday. Paid vacations 
and holidays, health/dental/vision 
coverage, and 401(k) program. 



Email resume and cover letter to: 

■franklin^ 
austinchronicle.com 
No phone calls please. EOE. 


A \ Senior Care 

HEARTHSTONE 
HEALTH CENTER 

CURRENT JOB OPENINGS 

Certified Nurse Aides 
Charge Nurse - LVN/RN 

Cook AA/EEO/M/F/D/V 

www.seniorGarecentersltc.com 

Click on Careers on the top tab. 
Select Career Opportunities on the left menu. 

401 Oakwood Blvd., Round Rock ( 512 ) 388-2166 




austinchronicle.com AUGUST 8, 2014 the Austin chronicle 83 











Premier Research is conducting a research study of an investigational over-the- 
counter (OTC) headache medication. If you are 18-65 years old and think you have 
had frequent headaches over the past 12 months that you treat with OTC medication, 
call us to learn more. Must also be willing to participate in 3 outpatient visits over a 
10-week period. 


Qualified participants may receive; 

• All study-related evaluations and study medication at no cost 

• Compensation up to $500 


1-866-518-6358 prEmiefT^ 

VolunteerWithPremier.com researcn 



PAINFUL 

BUNIONS? 


A BUNION is a painful bony bump on the side of the big 
toe that develops when your big toe starts to angle toward 
your other toes. 


If you are 18-75 years old and have bunions, call to see if you qualify for a medical 
research study to test an investigational pain medication following bunion removal. 
Must be available for a three-night stay in the clinic. 

Qualified participants may receive bunion removal surgery by a board-certified 
podiatrist, study-related evaluations and study medication at no cost. Compen- 
sation up to $1 ,250 may also be provided for time. 

Call Premier Research today to see if you pre-qualify. 


1 - 866 - 851-4347 

BunionTrials.com 


premier 

research 



EMPLOYMENT Hire employ- 
ees who are as smart as you 
are! Advertise your positions 
in The Austin Chronicle’s Help 
Wanted section. Call 512-454- 
5765 for more info. 


■CLASS A DRIVER 


GIC is looking for Class A 
driver with 3 yrs experience. 
For more info 661-201-9275 
gictransport@att.net 


ENGINEERING Cintra US 
Services LLC seeks Project 
Cost Engineer to work in 
Austin, TX. Consult with 
internal personnel to collect 
necessary information and 
input to formulate estimates 
and apply towards RFIs/RFQs/ 
RFPs in support of transport 
infrastructure (civil) 
engineering projects. Related 
degree and/or experience and/ 
or skills required. Send resume 
and cover letter to careers® 
cintra.us, reference “Project 
Cost Engineer.” 


LEAD PROJECT MANAGER 

Flare Industries, LLC is 
recruiting for the position of 
Lead Project Manager - Latin 
America (Job Code 513463) in 
Austin, TX to manage a project 
execution team to execute 
multiple projects from incep- 
tion to completion, including 
engineering design, client ap- 
provals, materials procurement, 
fabrication, and shipment. 
Applicants should mail resume 
referencing Job Code 513463 to 
Flare HR Dept. 16310 Bratton 
Lane Bldg. 3 Suite 350, Austin, 
TX 78728. EOE. 


REAL ESTATE 

APARTMENT LOCATORS 
NEEDED FOR BUSY OFFICE! 

GOT TX REAL ESTATE 
LICENSE! 

WE PROVIDE LEADS 

Busy apartment locating office 
No experience necessary. 

No office/desk Fees. 
Competitive split. Great 
Training. 

Make money soon! 

Call Ivan at 
512.586.9231 

2030 E Oltorf St 78741 



Management is seeking 
experienced candidates for 
our Maintenance Supervisor 
position in Austin, TX. Must 
have supervisory experience 
in the apartment industry. 
Forward resume to 
nmora@apmanagement.net 


RESTAURANT/ 
RETAil 

ALL Red River Cafe now hiring 
WAITSTAFF & COOK with 
experience. Apply 2-4pm every 
day, 2912 Medical Arts. 


FREE ADS Looking to hire a 
bartender? Have an apartment 
you need to rent? Want to 
advertise your handyman skills? 
All you need to do is go online 
to www.austinchronicle.com/ 
classifieds and post your ad 
for FREE. Make it stand out 
with pictures! Highlight it by 
making it a featured ad! You 
can even run it in print! Ads 
run online for 30 days, and are 
posted immediately. After all, 
immediate gratification takes 
too long! 


SALES/ 

MARKETiNG 


Part Time Receptionist 

THE AUSTIN 
CHRONICLE 

is seeking a part time recep- 
tionist. 30 hours per week. 
Position requires familiar- 
ity with a multiline phone 
system and the ability to 
function in an insanely busy 
office. The ideal candidate 
must be personable, patient, 
and organized. Job require- 
ments include light office 
tasks such as filing, stuffing 
tear sheets and 
mailing invoices. 

Email resume to 
Cassandra Pearce at 
cpearce@austinchronicle. 
com. No phone calls please. 
EOE. 


TELEMARKETERS 

We are hiring today! Hourly 
plus great bonuses. Can earn 
$8-14 per hour. No experience, 
paid training. Accepting 
applications Mon-Fri 1:00-6:00 
PM at 6448 Hwy 290 East, Suite 
D110, Austin, TX 78723 Call 
512-573-3981 


* « 


Senior Care 

• I > I I K ^ 


SENIOR CARE 
OF ONION CREEK 



CURRENT JOB OPENINGS 

Certified Nurse Aide Director of Business Development 

Charge Nurse - LVN/RN Assistant Director of Nursing 

Social Services Director Cook 


Medical Records AA/EEO/M/F/D/V 

APPLY ^ www.seniorcarecentersltc.com 

ONLINE Click on Careers on the top tab. 

Select Career Opportunities on the left menu. 

1700 Onion Creek Parkway, Austin ( 512 ) 291-4900 



* # 


Senior Care 

*■ t > J » it ^ 


PARK VALLEY INN 
HEALTH CENTER 

CURRENT JOB OPENINGS 


Certified Nurse Aides 


APPLY 

ONLINE 


AA/EEO/M/F/D/V 

www.seniorcarecentersltc.com 

Click on Careers on the top tab. 
Select Career Opportunities on the left menu. 


17751 Park Valley. Round Rock ( 512 ) 218-6000 


84 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE AUGUST 8, 2014 austinchronicle.com 





STUDIES 

RESEARCH 

The Austin Chronicle's 
Research Studies Page. 
Better than a loan shark 
named Vinny. 


DONOR PROGRAM 

SEMEN DONORS 
NEEDED 

Fairfax Cryobank seeks college 
educated men 18-39 to partici- 
pate in 6 month donor program. 
Avg. $100 per specimen. Visit 
our website for free applica- 
tion or apply online at www. 
beaspermdonor.com 


MRT-TIME RECEPnONIST 


The Austin Chronicle is seeking 
a part-time receptionist. 

(30 hrs per week) 

Job responsibHities includes 

* Light office tasks such as filing, stuffing tear sheets, 

and mailing invoices 

Requirements: 

* Familiarity with a multi-line phone system 

* Ability to function in an insanely busy office 

* The ideal candidate must be personable, patient, 

and organized. 


Emaii resume to Cassandra 
Pearce at: Cpearce# 

austinchronicle.com 

No phone calls please. EOE. 



TRUCK DRIVER NEEDED 

Hanes Geo Components (a division of Leggett & 
Platt) is seeking a local delivery truck driver for 
our location in Austin, TX. 

This position requires excellent communication skills, 
a valid Class B CDL license and a minimum of 3 years 
truck driving experience, a clean driving record and 
stable work history. Moffett and flatbed skills required. 
QUALCOMM experience a plus. We offer a competi- 
tive hourly rate. Benefits include: health/dental/vision 
insurance, 401 -k, and discounted stock program. 

Qualified applicants e-mail your resume to 

human.resources@hanesindustries.com or apply in person 
at Hanes Geo Components from 9am-4pm Monday-Friday: 

HANES GEO COMPONENTS 

4101 South Industrial, Suite 100 Austin, TX 78744 

Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative ActlonA/eteran/Disability Employer 



IWf WOMEN’S RIGHTS/ 
Oean^ up THE ENVIRONMENT! 
RACISM/ 

LGBT/ 



Telefund, Inc., Austin's progressive fundraising firm, 
seeks articulate, cause-oriented, and dependable callers 
for friendly, comfortable, downtown Austin office. 

WeeTtencl/ Meuteetv/ EeeimaSlufo, 12^40 hufJiMek 

VERY FLEXIBLE SCHEDULING! 

Callnoti)'! 



telefund 



2 'O 


D 

O 




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for natural light! Wood floors, 
open kitchens with granite 
counters, stainless appliances. 
Free garage parking, $1,225! 
Broker 


CENTRAL 

From $650 for studios 

All Day Long Like Cheech and 

Chong!! 

Pool 

Bus route friendly 
Most bills paid 
Co-signers welcome 

RonJon 

AptNon 

Broker 

512-293-7443 

www.ronjontheapartmentmon. 

com 

ronjontheapartmentmon@ 

hotmail.com 

CENTRAL 693-7231 ^ 

AustinCool.com 78704 Owner- 
managed. S. 1st Street. Walk 
to food and drink, minutes to 
downtown. W/D connections. 
1/1, $835. Broker 

CENTRAL SOUTH 

1-1 South Central ASAP $700 to 
$750 quick approval. Nice and 
spacious. 

Austin Area Apt Locators 
2030 E. Oltorf. 

512.494.4343 

Tracking #-AC5 

EAST 

4 b/ 4 bath apt All Bills paid; 
Prelease by the fall UT Shuttle; 
Starting at $1600 

Call Austin Area Apt Locators 
2030 E. Oltorf. 

512.494.4343 

Tracking #-AC1 


EAST Studio with no carpet- 
ing! Minutes to downtown, 
$815. AustinCool.com 512-693- 
7231. Broker 


EAST/CENTRAL 

2 bedroom Under $800 Avail- 
able Now! Call for Details! 

Austin Area Apt Locators 
2030 E. Oltorf. 

512.494.4343 

Tracking #-AC9 

NORTH 

Studios from $550 

Ron Jon 
Apt Non 
Broker 

512 - 293-7443 

ronjontheapartmentmon.com 

ronjontheapartmentmon@ 

hotmail.com 


NORTH 

Best Deal In Austin TXI! 

1 bedroom $650 

Bathroom outside the bedroom 
W/D conns 
Close to I H 35 
Fast move ins 

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Apt Non 
512 - 293-7443 

ronjontheapartmentmon.com 

SOUTH 

AustinCool.com 693-7231 Two 
blocks to Auditorium Shores 
and hike-and-bike trail. Remod- 
eled with wood floors, black 
appliances. Creekviews, big 
dogs okay. $1,275. Broker 

SOUTH 

1-1 Available ASAP!! South for 
only $710 W/D connections! 

Austin Area Apt Locators 
2030 E. Oltorf. 

512.494.4343 

Tracking #-AC8 

SOUTH 

2 bedroom, ALL BREEDS 
WELCOME, for only $10991! 

Call Austin Area Apt Locators 
2030 E. Oltorf. 

512.494.4343 

Tracking #-AC2 

SOUTH 

2 bedrooms All Wood floors. 
South Austin Starting $900 to 
$975 Free Cable. 

Austin Area Apt Locators 
2030 E. Oltorf. 

512.494.4343 

Tracking #-AC3 


SOUTH #1 AustinCool.com 
693-7231 Greenbelt trail at door, 
W/D inci, walk to shops/cafes- 
cool 78704, $1038. Broker 


SOUTH 

2 BR Townhome; Nice and 
quiet community for Starting 
at $959. 

Austin Area Apt Locators 
2030 E. Oltorf. 

512.494.4343 

Tracking #-AC4 

SOUTH “ "" 

#1 AustinCool.com 693-7231 
Remodeled unit, walk to Barton 
Springs Pool! Property on 
greenbelt, park-like setting. Big 
dogs okay! $898mo. Broker 


RONJON TOE 
APT MON 

FREE APT 
LOCATING 

Keeping Austin weirder 
one day at a time 



Studio $575 Hard to find 



1’s $609 Resort style 

2’s 

$769 W/D Conns. 

on a budget 


Close to downtown 

$650 Screened-in private 


on bus route 

patio, W/D Conns 

3’s 

$930, W/D Conn 

CALL FOR IVIORE 

LISTINGS! 


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No credit, bad credit, 1st time renters, co-signers no problem, men!! 

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1 -1 on East Central Starting at $759. 3 bedroom under $1500. 

1 -1 Near Downtown W/D connections $765 
2-2 bedroom; Tons of Amenities Starting at $899 
1 Remodeled on UT Shuttle $729 
1 & 2 bedrooms Most Bills Paid; on UT Shuttle. Quiet Community 
3-2 South Central. Free Cable at $1300 
Nice 2 Bedroom Townhome in Quiet Community. South Austin $969 
1-1 $795 2-2 $1 1 00. All Dog's Welcome. No Breed Restrictions. East Central 
Immediate Approval 1-1's from 1000 2'sfrom $1400 3-2's form $1600 



@ 512.494.4343 • Hablamos Espanol 

www.austinAAIocators.com 

^ 2030 East Oltorf 78741 (TRACKING #-DlSPLAYl) 



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BRIDGES ON THE PARK 


FOUR SEASONS AND MORE 


austinchronicle.com AUGUST 8, 2014 the 


SOUTH 

Another smokin' deal 
ONLY $99 deposit 
Is from $595 
2s from $749 
Close to everything 
Pool 

Bus routes 
Fun place to live 

Ron Jon 
Apt Mon 
512-293-7443 

ronjontheapartmentmon.com 


SOUTH 2 BR/2.5 BA, Heart of 
SOCO! Water/Cable/W/D 
includ. Cool Condo, Spacious 
Master, wood floors, great area! 
$1,100 (319) 321-4775 


SOUTH 

Ibdrs $599-$709 
2bdrs $759-$849 
Get Back to Nature!! 

Wake up fishing or having cof- 
fee around ur private pond 
-Fishing 
-Fitness room 
-Sparkling pools 
-Private patio 
-Bus route friendly 

Ron Jon 
Apt Mon 

Broker 

512-293-7443 

ronjontheapartmentmon.com 

ronjontheapartmentmon@ 

hotmail.com 


SOUTH/CENTRAL 

2 bedrom W/D conn, small pets 
ok $9751, close to DT 

Austin Area Apt Locators 
2030 E. Oltorf. 

512.494.4343 

Tracking #-AC7 

SOUTH/CENTRAL 

Resort Style-Bailer Shot 
Caller!! 

1 bedrooms $595-$649 

2 bedrooms $749-$859 
EZ on Credit 

Hot Tub 
Tennis Courts 
Big Pools 
Bus route friendly 
W/D conns 

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SOUTH/CENTRAL 

Too Hot To Handle!! 

4 bedrooms from $1200 
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Close to bus route 
Pools 

Fitness room 

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SOUTHWEST ■ 

AustinCool.com 

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UPSCALE 1/1 $865 
2/1 $1,020 
3/2 $1,280 

with W/D connections, indoor 
full-size basketball court, 
huge fitness center with 
classes. 

Sunset Valley area. 

Broker 

AUSTINCOOL.COM 

AUSTIN 

COOL 

PROPERTIES 


SOUTHWEST #1 AustinCool. 
com 693-7231 Luxury on 
canyon park land. Wet weather 
waterfalls and swimming 
holes, minutes to downtown. 
Lavish condo construction 
with soundproofing. Large up- 
dated kitchen with gas range, 
oversized bathrooms, bright 
with large windows. Huge 2/2, 
includes cable and valet trash! 
Broker 


DUPIEX/HOUSES 


CENTRAL 2 BR/1 BA, Travis 
Heights! WDconn, 1912 A 
Fairlawn Ln., great location, 
no smokers $1,200 (512) 771- 
8257 


C 

AUSTIN CHRONICLE 85 












DUPLEX/ 
HOUSES (ont. 


CENTRAL Houses available 
for Short Term Rental 
or During Events such as 
SXSW, ACL or F-1 
Call 512.465.2443 
FlintRockPM.com 


FUNT rcx:k , . 


COMMERCIAL 

OFFICES for rent in holistic 
health building with great 
people. SW Austin, 110-400 sq. 
ft. $770-$2,000. Front desk ser- 
vices available. 512-328-4041 


ROOMMATES 


CENTRAL 1 BR/1 BA, 1878 
sq ft home 3bd/2bt. guest rm 
available no pets ecig ok w/d 
U-Verse(TV internet wifi 
phone) sec sys community 
pool esy acess to 35, Ben 
White/71/290 &1 30 $1,000 
granalys@yahoo.com 


CENTRAL 

DOWNTOWN LOFT 
EXPERTS 

Starting at $275K! 

Wood, stainless appliances 
& more! Older Downtown 
condos starting at $101 K! 
Broker 

(512)693-7231 

All downtown listings at: 
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AUSTINCOOL.COM 

AUSTIN 

COOL 

PROPERTIES 


HOMES FOR SALE 

YOUR OWN NEW HOME, 

$0 Down available in some 
areas! Builder and/or lender 
pays some closing costs! 
Call, Home Brokers at 512- 
494-4343 

Tracking #-AC10 


MOBILE HOME LOT FOR 
SALE 

1/2 acre, Bandera Hill Country, 
water & sewer already installed. 
WILL FINANCE 830-460-8354, 
NO CREDIT NEEDED!! 


NORTH 

Where can you find 3 bedrooms 
with 2 full baths plus half bath 
in Austin for under $130K? This 
two story townhome with ga- 
rage does it. Almost 1300 sq ft 
all freshly redone. Nice big pool 
right out the door. Located just 
north of 183. Call Condo Joe for 
showing 512-203-4100 

.Vpt 


FOR SALE 

ALL 

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SEARCH 5,000-1- 
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CENTRAL 

A favorite new complex near 
UT. 1/1 overlooking Guadalupe, 
across street from Wheatsville 
Co-op. Almost brand new, in 
excellent condition. Secure 
access for bldg and parking. 

All granite, stainless, wood 
floors, etc. Very nice! $219,700. 
Call Condo Joe for showing 
512-203-4100 

512-203-4100 

Vft 


NORTHEAST 


4BR/2.5BA4,416sf 
Beautiful Victorian 
built in 1876. 
www.palestinemagn 
oliahouse.(om for 
details. $379,000 
Agent (903) 922- 
6832 


NORTHWEST 


Hilly aerial view 3/4 acre 
vacant lot, near golf courses. 
City util/amen included. $40k 
OBO. zola1800@gmail.com 


SOUTH 

A 2 bd plus a ground level of- 
fice with separate entrance on 
Manchaca! $189,700 to mark 
your spot in south Austin for 
you, a roommate, and a place 
to do business. 1000 sq ft. Re- 
done in 2007 with wood floors, 
granite, stainless, etc. Perfect 
south Austin abode. Call Condo 
Joe for showing 512-203-4100 

.Vpt 



{51Z) 203-4100 
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CLOTHING/ 
JEWELRY 

APPAREL GOTH * PUNK * 
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pins, jewelry, corsets. 

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COMPUTERS/ 

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DISH TV Starting at $19.99/ 
month (for12mos.) SAVE! 
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cash4car.com 


MOTOR “Get the hell out of 
my way! You have no right to 
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of crap!" Find a new car in 
The Austin Chronicle’s Motor 
Section. 


PETS/PET 

SUPPLIES 



AKC registered standard 
poodle puppies for sale. 3 
black males born 6/5/14. 
American and European 
championship bloodlines. 
The maternal great 
grandfather was the last 
standard poodle to win 
Westminster dog show. Katy, 
TX www.tasumapoodles.com 
$1,500 (832) 338-6234 
brandy@complianceprocessi 
ng.net 


TICKETS/ 

ENTERTAINMENT 

TICKETS We “B” Tickets 

* Best Seats * Best Prices * 
Haggard * Nickel Creek * 
Santana * 

Jim Gaffigan * UT Football * 
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David Gray * Black Keys * 

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Jerry Jeff* * Rodrigo y Gabri- 

ela * Ringo 

Blue Man Group * Oddball Fest 

* Mannheim * CSN 
Widespread Panic * Patty 
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Panic at the Disco * Rufus 
Wainwright * Erasure 
Pickup/Mail Order 512 448-2303 



This beautiful cattle 
dog mix came to 
us from San Saba, 
where she had 
lived on a ranch. 
Jessie Jane loves 
other dogs and is 
always excited to 
see people. Cattle 
dog breeds are 
known for their 
intelligence and 
charm, and she 
is no exception! ^ 
Besides, who can 
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one floppy ear?!? 




260-SPCA CALL FOR HOURS 

909 S. BAGDAD RD., LEANDER, TX 

CENTRALTEXASSPCA.COM 





Pef 

Don’t let my name 
fool you, I’m no 
plain Jane! Isn’t 
the white spot on 
my nose adorable? 

I am a really 
sweet cat looking 
for my forever 
home where I can 
lounge, stretch, 
cuddle and play 
occasionally. I’d 
prefer to be your 
only cat, and I’ll 
give you all the 
love you could 
ever need! 

124 W. Anderson Ln. 512/646-7387 ext. 105 



LEGAL 

Application has been 
made with the Texas 
Alcoholic Beverage 
Commission for a 
Mixed Beverage Li- 
cense by West Campus 
Partners dba Toastie’s 
Bar to be located at 
2408 San Gabriel, Ste 
A & B, Austin, Travis, 
Texas. Partners of 
West Campus Partners 
are Kacie & Michael 
Lucey, General Part- 
ners 

Application has been 
made with the Texas 
Alcoholic Beverage 
Commission for a 
MIXED BEVERAGE PER- 
MIT by NINE SUGARS, 
LLC dba NIGHTCAP, to 
be located at 1401 W 
6th STREET, AUSTIN, 
TRAVIS, Texas. Of- 
ficers of said corpora- 
tion areCHRISTIN 
ROWAN ADAMS. 

Application has been 
made with the Texas 
Alcoholic Beverage 
Commission for a 
Mixed Beverage 
Permit with FB by 
TRB Beverage LLC dba 
Twisted Root Burger 
Company located at 
7211 Burnet Road, 
AustinAravis County 
Texas. Manager of 
said LLC is Jason Boso/ 
Manager/Member 

Application has been 
made with the Texas 
Alcoholic Beverage 
Commission for Wine 
& Beer Retailer’s Per- 
mit, Food & Beverage 
Certificate by Arirang 
Restaurant LLC, dba 
Arirang 6801 Airport 
Blvd #90, Austin, 
Travis County, Texas. 
Young Duk Lee, Sole 
Managing Member. 

CITATION BY PUBLICA- 
TION 

THE STATE OF TEXAS 
CAUSE NO: D-1-FM-14-002048 
To: ALBERT GONZALO 
CAMACHO 

and to all who it may concern, 
Respondent(s); GREETINGS: 
YOU HAVE BEEN SUED. You 
may employ an attorney. If 
you or your attorney do not 
file a written answer with the 


clerk who issued this citation 
by 10:00 A.M. on the Monday 
next following the expiration 
of twenty days after you were 
served this citation and peti- 
tion, a default judgment may be 
taken against you. 

YOU ARE HEREBY COM- 
MANDED to appear and 
answer before the Honorable 
District Court, 53RD JUDICIAL 
DISTRICT COURT, Travis 
County, Texas, at the Court- 
house of said County in Austin, 
Texas, at or before 10 o’clock 
A.M. of the Monday next after 
expiration of twenty days from 
the date of service of this cita- 
tion, then and there to answer 
the ORIGINAL PETITION FOR 
DIVORCE, TRAVIS COUNTY 
STANDING ORDER filed in 
said court on JULY 18, 2014, 
and said suit being number 
D-1-FM-1 4-002048 on the docket 
of said Court, and entitled 
“IN THE MATTER OF THE 
MARRIAGE OF ASHLEY RENEE 
CAMACHO and ALBERT GON- 
ZALO CAMACHO, ET AL, and 
In the Interest of MAKAYLA 
D’LYNN CAMACHO, IN RE 
CHILDREN, CHILD”. 

The nature of said suit is a 
request to DISSOLVE the 
marriage of the parties, appoint 
managing and possessory 
conservators, and divide the 
estate of the parties in a man- 
ner that the court deems is just 
and right. 

The Court has authority in this 
suit to enter any judgment or 
decree in the CHILD’S interest 
which will be binding on you, 
including the termination of the 
parent-child relationship, the 
determination of paternity, and 
the appointment of a conserva- 
tor with authority to consent to 
the CHILD’S adoption. 

Issued and given under my 
hand and the seal of said court 
at Austin, Texas, July 29, 2014. 
AMALIA RODRIGUEZ- 
MENDOZA 

Travis County District Clerk 
Travis County Courthouse 
1000 Guadalupe, PO Box 
679003 (78767) 

Austin, TX 78701 
PREPARED BY: ALANIZ 
IFRAIN 

REQUESTED BY: 

ASHLEY RENEE CAMACHO 
1707 TIMBERWOODDR. 
AUSTIN, TEXAS 78741 

CITATION BY PUBLICA- 
TION 

THE STATE OF TEXAS 
TO ALL PERSONS INTEREST- 
ED IN THE ESTATE OF JORGE 
LUIS DUARTE Deceased, No. 
C-1-PB-14-001355 in Probate 
Court Number One of Travis 
County, Texas. LUIS FELIPE 
DUARTE AND ALL 
The alleged heir(s) at law in the 
above numbered and entitled 
estate, filed in Probate Court 
No. 1, Heman Marion Sweatt 
Travis County Courthouse, 1000 
Guadalupe, Austin, Texas, on 
July 25, 2014, an Application 
to Determine Heirship and Ap- 
plication for Independent Ad- 
ministration of Interstate Estate 
by Agreement and Letters of 
Independent Administration in 
the said estate and request(s) 
that said Court determine 
who are the heirs and only 
heirs of the said JORGE LUIS 
DUARTE, Deceased, and their 
respective shares and interests 
in such estate. 

Said application will be heard 
and acted on by said Court 
at 10:00 o’clock a.m. on the 
first Monday next after the 
expiration of ten days from date 
of publication of this citation, 
at the County Courthouse in 
Travis County, Texas. 

All persons interested in said 
estate are hereby cited to 
appear before said Honorable 
Court at said above mentioned 
time and place by filing a 
written answer contesting such 
application should they desire 
to do so. 

If this citation is not served 
within 90 days after date of its 
issuance, it shall be returned 
un served. 

GIVEN UNDER MY HAND AND 
THE SEAL OF SAID COURT 
at the office in Travis County, 
Texas, on July 25, 2014. 

Dana DeBeauvoir 
County Clerk, Travis County, 

P.O. Box 149325 AUSTIN, 
TEXAS 78711-9325 
By Deputy: GLORIA CANTU 

CIT^FoN BY PUBLICA- 
TION THE AUSTIN CHRONI- 
CLE CLASSIFIED 
THE STATE OF TEXAS 
TO: RYAN AUSTIN Defendant, 
in the hereinafter styled and 
numbered cause: You have 
been sued. You may employ an 
attorney. If you or your Attor- 


86 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE AUGUSTS, 2014 austinchronicle.com 











ney do not file a written answer 
with the clerk who issued this 
citation by 10:00 a.m. on the 
Monday next following the 
expiration of 42 days from the 
date of issuance of this citation, 
the same being September 8, 
2014, a default judgment may 
be taken against you. CAUSE 
NUMBER: C-1 -CV-1 4-000451 , 
styled SONYA GUERRA V 
RYAN AUSTIN 
Filed in COUNTY COURT AT 
LAW #2, Neman Marion Sweatt 
Travis County Courthouse, 1000 
Guadalupe, Austin, Texas, on 
January 21, 2014. 

STYLED: SONYA GUERRA V 
RYAN AUSTIN 
NATURE OF SUIT: MOTOR 
VEHICLE DAMAGES 
Given under my hand and seal 
of Dana DeBeauvoir, County 
Clerk on July 24, 2014. 

County Clerk, Travis County, 
Texas 

P.O. Box 149325, Austin, Texas 
78714-9325 

By Deputy: /s/M. BRYANT 
Plaintiff Attorney: 

SCOTT PATRICK OGLE 
2028 W BEN WHITE BLVD 
AUSTIN, TX 78704-7519 


CITATION BY PUBLICA- 
TION THE STATE OF TEXAS 
CAUSE NO: D-1-FM-14-004164 
To: CESAR ALFREDO FLORES 
and to all who it may concern, 
Respondent(s); GREETINGS: 
YOU HAVE BEEN SUED. You 
may employ an attorney. If 
you or your attorney do not 
file a written answer with the 
clerk who issued this citation 
by 10:00 A.M. on the Monday 
next following the expiration 
of twenty days after you were 
served this citation and peti- 
tion, a default judgment may be 
taken against you. 

YOU ARE HEREBY COM- 
MANDED to appear and 
answer before the Honor- 
able District Court, 41 9TH 
JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, 
Travis County, Texas, at the 
Courthouse of said County in 
Austin, Texas, at or before 10 
o'clock A.M. of the Monday 
next after expiration of twenty 
days from the date of service 
of this citation, then and there 
to answer the ORIGINAL PETI- 
TION FOR DIVORCE, TRAVIS 
COUNTY STANDING ORDER 
filed in said court on JULY 
21 , 2014, and said suit being 
number D-1-FM-1 4-0041 64 on 
the docket of said Court, and 
entitled “IN THE MATTER OF 
THE MARRIAGE OF INGRID 
SUYAPA GRANADOS LOPEZ 
and CESAR ALFREDO FLORES, 
ETAL CHILDREN, and In the 
Interest of INGRID ANDREA 
FLORES, ETAL CHILDREN”. 
The nature of said suit is a 
request to DISSOLVE the 
marriage of the parties, appoint 
managing and possessory con- 
servators, and divide the estate 
of the parties in a manner that 
the court deems just and right. 
The Court has authority in this 
suit to enter any judgment or 
decree in the child’s interest 
which will be binding on you, 
including the termination of the 
parent-child relationship, the 
determination of paternity, and 
the appointment of a conserva- 
tor with authority to consent to 
the child’s adoption. 

Issued and given under my 
hand and the seal of said court 
at Austin, Texas, July 25, 2014. 
AMALIA RODRIGUEZ- 
MENDOZA 

Travis County District Clerk 
Travis County Courthouse 
1000 Guadalupe, 

P.O. Box 679003 (78767) 

Austin, Texas 78701 
PREPARED BY: ALANIZ 
IFRAIN 

REQUESTED BY: 

INGRID SUYAPA GRANA 
LOPEZ 

C/0 ATTORNEY EMILY RAY 
VOLUNTEER LEGAL SERVICES 
816 CONGRESS AVE., SUITE 
701 

AUSTIN, TEXAS 78701 


CITATION BY PUBLICA- 
TION THE STATE OF TEXAS 
CAUSE NO: D-1-GN-1 4-001 026 
To: ALL PERSONS CLAIMING 
AN INTEREST IN THE REAL 
PROPERTY LOCATED AT, 1902 
NEW YORKAVENUE, AUSTIN, 
TRAVIS COUNTY, TEXAS 
Defendant(s), in the hereinafter 
styled and numbered cause: 
YOU (AND EACH OF YOU) 
HAVE BEEN SUED. You may 
employ an attorney. If you 
or your attorney do not file a 
written answer with the clerk 
who issued this citation by 
10:00 A.M. on the Monday 
next following the expiration 
of 42 days from the date of 
issuance hereof, that is to say 
at or before 10 o'clock A.M. 
of Monday the AUGUST 18, 


2014, and answer the PLAIN- 
TIFF’S SECOND AMENDED 
ORIGINAL PETITION FOR 
TRESPASS TO TRY TITLE 
AND FOR PARTITION SALE of 
Plaintiff(s), filed inthe53RD 
JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT of 
Travis County, Texas, on JULY 
3, 2014, a default judgment may 
be taken against you. 

Said suit being number 
D-1-GN-14-001026, in which 
COZETTE BUTLER Plaintiff(s), 
and PHYLLIS SISTRUNK, 
ROBERT BUTLE R, RUTH 
OVERTON, SOPHIA REED, 
MARION REED, LETTIE KING, 
SOPHELIA HOLLAND, MACK 
REED, DOUGLAS REED, 
TOMMY JOE REED, ESTELLA 
REED, SHIRLEY REED, BENJA- 
MIN REED, AND ALL OTHER 
PERSONS CLAIMSING AN 
INTEREST IN THE REAL 
PROPERTY LOCATED AT 1902 
NEW YORK AVENUE, AUSTIN, 
TRAVIS COUNTY, TEXAS, 
and the nature of which said 
suit is as follows: 

TRESPASS TO TRY TITLE, AND 
PARTITION SALE, REGARD- 
ING THE PROPERTY BEING 
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS, 
1902 NEW YORKAVENUE, LOT 
NUMBER TWO (2) IN BLOCK 
NUMBER SIXTEEN (16) IN 
FORSTER’S SUBDIVISION 
OF OUTLOT NUMBER FIFTY- 
EIGHT (58) IN DIVISION “B” 

IN AUSTIN, TRAVIS COUNTY, 
TEXAS 

ALL OF WHICH MORE FULLY 
APPEARS FROM PLAIN- 
TIFF’S SECOND AMENDED 
ORIGINAL PETITION FOR 
TRESPASS TO TRY TITLE 
AND FOR PARTITION SALE 
ON FILE IN THIS OFFICE, AND 
WHICH REFERENCE IS HERE 
MADE FOR ALL INTENTS AND 
PURPOSES. 

Issued and given under my 
hand and the seal of said court 
at Austin, Texas, July 03, 2014. 
/s/ AMALIA RODRIGUEZ- 
MENDOZA 

Travis County District Clerk 
Travis County Courthouse 
1000 Guadalupe, P.O. Box 
679003 (78767) 

Austin, TX 78701 
PREPARED BY: HERNANDEZ 
KIRBY A 
REQUESTED BY: 

DON E WALDEN 

7200 N MO PAC EXPY STE 300 

AUSTIN, TX 78731-3267 

BUSINESS PHONE: (512) 

349-9595 

FAX: (512) 795-8079 


CITATION BY PUBLICA- 
TION THE STATE OF TEXAS 
TO ALL PERSONS INTEREST- 
ED IN THE ESTATE OF ALGE 
M COLLINS, SR Deceased, No. 
C-1-PB-63-024872 in Probate 
Court Number One of Travis 
County, Texas. 

DONNIE BREEDLOVE and all 
The alleged heir(s) at law in the 
above numbered and entitled 
estate, filed in Probate Court 
No. 1, Heman Marion Sweatt 
Travis County Courthouse, 1000 
Guadalupe, Austin, Texas, on 
April 1 1 , 2014, an Application to 
Determine Heirship in the said 
estate and request(s) that said 
Court determine who are the 
heirs and only heirs of the said 
ALGE M COLLINS, Deceased, 
and their respective shares and 
interests in such estate. 

Said application will be heard 
and acted on by said Court 
at 10:00 o’clock a.m. on the 
first Monday next after the 
expiration of ten days from date 
of publication of this citation, 
at the County Courthouse in 
Travis County, Texas. 

All persons interested in said 
estate are hereby cited to 
appear before said Honorable 
Court at said above mentioned 
time and place by filing a 
written answer contesting such 
application should they desire 
to do so. 

If this citation is not served 
within 90 days after date of its 
issuance, it shall be returned 
un served. 

GIVEN UNDER MY HAND AND 
THE SEAL OF SAID COURT at 
office in Travis County, Texas, 
on July 30, 2014. 

Dana DeBeauvoir 
County Clerk, 

Travis County, Texas 
P.O. BOX 149325 
AUSTIN, TEXAS 78714-9325 
By Deputy: /s/0. RUIZ 

CITATION BY PUBLICA- " 
TION THE STATE OF TEXAS 
TO ALL PERSONS INTER- 
ESTED IN THE ESTATE OF 
CHARLES S BLAKENEY De- 
ceased, No. C-1-PB-14-001343 
in Probate Court Number One 
of Travis County, Texas. 

HEATH ANDREW BLAKENEY 
AND ALL The alleged heir(s) 
at law in the above numbered 
and entitled estate, filed in 


Probate Court No. 1 , Heman 
Marion Sweatt Travis County 
Courthouse, 1000 Guadalupe, 
Austin, Texas, on July 23, 2014, 
an Application to Determine 
Heirship and Letters of Inde- 
pendent Administration in the 
said estate and request(s) that 
said Court determine who are 
the heirs and only heirs of the 
said CHARLES S BLAKENEY, 
Deceased, and their respective 
shares and interests in such 
estate. 

Said application will be heard 
and acted on by said Court 
at 10:00 o’clock a.m. on the 
first Monday next after the 
expiration of ten days from date 
of publication of this citation, 
at the County Courthouse in 
Travis County, Texas. 

All persons interested in said 
estate are hereby cited to 
appear before said Honorable 
Court at said above mentioned 
time and place by filing a 
written answer contesting such 
application should they desire 
to do so. 

If this citation is not served 
within 90 days after date of its 
issuance, it shall be returned 
un served. 

GIVEN UNDER MY HAND AND 
THE SEAL OF SAID COURT at 
office in Travis County, Texas, 
on July 24, 2014. 

Dana DeBeauvoir 
County Clerk, 

Travis County, Texas 
P.O. BOX 149325 
AUSTIN, TEXAS 78714-9325 
By Deputy: /s/M.C. ARZOLA 

CITATION BY PUBLICA- 
TION THE STATE OF TEXAS 
TO ALL PERSONS INTER- 
ESTED IN THE ESTATE OF 
HENRIETTA LEE PERKINS De- 
ceased, No. C-1 -PB-1 3-001 732 
in Probate Court Number One 
of Travis County, Texas. 
DONNIE BREEDLOVE and 
all The alleged heir(s) at 
law in the above numbered 
and entitled estate, filed in 
Probate Court No. 1 , Heman 
Marion Sweatt Travis County 
Courthouse, 1000 Guadalupe, 
Austin, Texas, on April 1 1 , 2014, 
a First Amended Application 
to Determine Heirship in the 
said estate and request(s) that 
said Court determine who are 
the heirs and only heirs of the 
said HENRIETTA LEE PERKINS 
COLLINS, Deceased, and their 
respective shares and interests 
in such estate. 

Said application will be heard 
and acted on by said Court 
at 10:00 o’clock a.m. on the 
first Monday next after the 
expiration of ten days from date 
of publication of this citation, 
at the County Courthouse in 
Travis County, Texas. 

All persons interested in said 
estate are hereby cited to 
appear before said Honorable 
Court at said above mentioned 
time and place by filing a 
written answer contesting such 
application should they desire 
to do so. 

If this citation is not served 
within 90 days after date of its 
issuance, it shall be returned 
un served. 

GIVEN UNDER MY HAND AND 
THE SEAL OF SAID COURT at 
office in Travis County, Texas, 
on July 30, 2014. 

Dana DeBeauvoir 
County Clerk, 

Travis County, Texas 
P.O. BOX 149325 
AUSTIN, TEXAS 78714-9325 
By Deputy: /s/0. RUIZ 

CITATION BY PUBLICA- 
TION THE STATE OF TEXAS 
TO ALL PERSONS INTER- 
ESTED IN THE ESTATE OF 
HUGO HIGGINS Deceased, No. 
C-1-PB-14-001358 in Probate 
Court Number One of Travis 
County, Texas. 

ARTHUR NELL HIGGINS AND 
ALL The alleged heir(s) at 
law in the above numbered 
and entitled estate, filed in 
Probate Court No. 1 , Heman 
Marion Sweatt Travis County 
Courthouse, 1000 Guadalupe, 
Austin, Texas, on July 28, 2014, 
an Application to Determine 
Heirship and an Application 
for Letters of Independent 
Administration in the said 
estate and request(s) that said 
Court determine who are the 
heirs and only heirs of the said 
HUGO HIGGINS, Deceased, 
and their respective shares and 
interests in such estate. 

Said application will be heard 
and acted on by said Court 
at 10:00 o’clock a.m. on the 
first Monday next after the 
expiration of ten days from date 
of publication of this citation, 
at the County Courthouse in 
Travis County, Texas. 

All persons interested in said 
estate are hereby cited to 


appear before said Honorable 
Court at said above mentioned 
time and place by filing a 
written answer contesting such 
application should they desire 
to do so. 

If this citation is not served 
within 90 days after date of its 
issuance, it shall be returned 
unserved. 

GIVEN UNDER MY HAND AND 
THE SEAL OF SAID COURT at 
office in Travis County, Texas, 
on July 30, 2014. 

Dana DeBeauvoir 
County Clerk, 

Travis County, Texas 
P.O. BOX 149325 
AUSTIN, TEXAS 78714-9325 
By Deputy: /s/ M. C. ARZOLA 

CITATION BY PUBLICA- 
TION THE STATE OF 
TEXAS TO ALL PERSONS 
INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE 
OF MARLETALILLEJORD, 
Deceased, No. C-1-PB-000286 
in Probate Court Number One 
of Travis County, Texas. 

HANS J LILLEJORD AND ALL 
the alleged heir(s) at law in the 
above numbered and entitled 
estate, filed in Probate Court 
No. 1, Heman Marion Sweatt 
Travis County Courthouse, 

1000 Guadalupe, Austin, 

Texas, on February 18, 2014, 
an Application for Probate of a 
Holographic Will and Issuance 
of Letters Testamentary; and 
to Determine Heirship in the 
said estate and request(s) that 
said Court determine who are 
the heirs and only heirs of the 
said MARLETA LILLEJORD, 
Deceased, and their respective 
shares and interests in such 
estate. 

Said application will be heard 
and acted upon by said Court 
at 1 0:00 o'clock on the first 
Monday next after the expira- 
tion of ten days from date of 
publication of this Citation, 
at the County Courthouse in 
Travis County, Texas. 

All persons interested in said 
estate are hereby cited to 
appear before said Honorable 
Court at said above mentioned 
time and place by filing a 
written answer contesting such 
application should they desire 
to do so. 

If this citation is not served 
within 90 days after date of its 
issuance, it shall be returned 
unserved. 

GIVEN UNDER MY HAND AND 
THE SEAL OF SAID COURT at 
office in Travis County, Texas, 
on July 29, 2014. 

Dana DeBeauvoir 
County Clerk, Travis County, 

?a BOX 149325 
Austin, Texas 78714-9325 
By Deputy: /s/ M.C. Arzola 

D-1-GV-05-003331 a/k/a 
GV-503331 CONSTABLE’S 
NOTICE OF SALE 
REAL PROPERTY DELIN- 
QUENT TAXES 
BY VIRTUE of a certain Order 
Of Sale issued by the clerk of 
the 345TH District Court of 
Travis County, on the 18th day 
of July, 2014 in a certain cause 
numbered D-1-GV-05-003331 
a/k/a GV-503331 , wherein 
City of Lago Vista, Lago Vista 
Independent School District, 
Travis County, Travis County 
Emergency Services District 
No. 1 and Travis County Hos- 
pital District are plaintiffs, and 
Virginia Reinhold Danos and 
Frederick J. Danos, if alive and 
if deceased, the unknown own- 
ers, assigns, successors and 
heirs of the Estate of Virginia 
Reinhold Danos and Frederick 
J. Danos are defendant(s), 
in favor of said plaintiffs, for 
the sum of $3,700.51 Dollars, 
together with all costs of suit, 
that being the amount of 
judgment recovered by the said 
plaintiffs, in the 345TH District 
Court of Travis County, Texas, 
on June 21, 2006. 

I, on the 31st day of July, 2014, 
at 2:00 o’clock P.M., have levied 
upon, and will, on the 2nd day 
of September, 2014 at 10:00 o' 
clock, A.M., at 1000 Guadalupe 
Street in the City of Austin, 
within legal hours, proceed 
to sell for cash to the highest 
bidder, all the rights, title and 
interest of defendants in and 
to the following described 
property, levied upon as the 
property of defendants, to-wit: 
Lot 21194, Highland Lake 
Estates, Section 21, Plat No. 
55/59 as described in Volume 
8471, Page 636 and Volume 
11702, Page 121 of the deed 
records of Travis County, 

T exas. 

THE ABOVE SALE to be made 
by me to satisfy the above de- 
scribed judgment for $3,700.51 
Dollars in favor of plaintiffs, 
together with the costs of said 


suit, and the proceeds applied 
to the satisfaction thereof. 
Witness my hand this 31st day 
of July, 2014. 

CARLOS B. LOPEZ, CON- 
STABLE PRECINCT 5 
TRAVIS COUNTY, TEXAS 
BY /s/ Sergeant Alan Redd 
DEPUTY 

ON THE PROPERTY SOLD, 
THERE ARE NO WARRAN- 
TIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, 
INCLUDING, BUT NOT 
LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED 
WARRANTIES OF MERCHANT- 
ABILITY AND FITNESS FOR 
A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. 
YOU BUY THE PROPERTY “AS 
IS”. BIDDERS ARE FURTHER 
ADVISED THAT PURCHASE 
OF THE PROPERTY AT THIS 
EXECUTION SALE MAY NOT 
EXTINGUISH ANY LIENS OR 
SECURITY INTERESTS ON THE 
PROPERTY. YOU ARE SIMPLY 
PURCHASING WHATEVER 
INTEREST THE DEBTOR HAS 
IN THE PROPERTY. IF YOU 
HAVE ANY QUESTIONS, YOU 
NEED TO CONSULT COUNSEL 
OF YOUR CHOICE. 


D-1-GV-1 1-001727 CONSTA- 
BLE’S NOTICE OF SALE 
REAL PROPERTY DELIN- 
QUENT TAXES 

BY VIRTUE of a certain Order 
Of Sale issued by the clerk 
of the 98TH District Court of 
Travis County, on the 18th day 
of July, 2014 in a certain cause 
numbered D-1-GV-1 1-001727, 
wherein Travis County, Lago 
Vista Independent School Dis- 
trict, Travis County Healthcare 
District d/b/a Central Health, 
Travis County Emergency 
Services District No. 1 and City 
of Lago Vista are plaintiffs, and 
Walter Goodin, if alive and if 
deceased, the unknown own- 
ers, heirs, assigns & successors 
of the Estate of Walter Goodin, 
Lloyd D. Conner (In Rem 
Only), if alive and if deceased, 
the unknown owners, heirs, 
assigns & successors of the 
Estate of Lloyd D. Conner and 
Mary Ann Balses Lauterborn 
are defendant(s), in favor of 
said plaintiffs, for the sum of 
$7,503.55 Dollars, together with 
all costs of suit, that being the 
amount of judgment recovered 
by the said plaintiffs, in the 
98TH District Court of Travis 
County, Texas, on July 30, 2012. 
I, on the 31st day of July, 2014, 
at 2:00 o’clock P.M., have levied 
upon, and will, on the 2nd day 
of September, 2014 at 10:00 o' 
clock, A.M., at 1000 Guadalupe 
Street in the City of Austin, 
within legal hours, proceed 
to sell for cash to the highest 
bidder, all the rights, title and 
interest of defendants in and 
to the following described 
property, levied upon as the 
property of defendants, to-wit: 
Lot 9017, Highland Lake 
Estates Section Nine, Plat 
No. 51/78 as described in 
Volume 8818, Page 275 and 
document number 2010070080 
of the deed records of T ravis 
County, Texas. 

THE ABOVE SALE to be made 
by me to satisfy the above de- 
scribed judgment for $7,503.55 
Dollars in favor of plaintiffs, 
together with the costs of said 
suit, and the proceeds applied 
to the satisfaction thereof. 
Witness my hand this 31st day 
of July, 2014. 

CARLOS B. LOPEZ, 
CONSTABLE PRECINCT 5 
TRAVIS COUNTY, TEXAS 
BY /s/ Sergeant Alan Redd 
DEPUTY 

ON THE PROPERTY SOLD, 
THERE ARE NO WARRAN- 
TIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, 
INCLUDING, BUT NOT 
LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED 
WARRANTIES OF MERCHANT- 
ABILITY AND FITNESS FOR 
A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. 
YOU BUY THE PROPERTY “AS 
IS”. BIDDERS ARE FURTHER 
ADVISED THAT PURCHASE 
OF THE PROPERTY AT THIS 
EXECUTION SALE MAY NOT 
EXTINGUISH ANY LIENS OR 
SECURITY INTERESTS ON THE 
PROPERTY. YOU ARE SIMPLY 
PURCHASING WHATEVER 
INTEREST THE DEBTOR HAS 
IN THE PROPERTY. IF YOU 
HAVE ANY QUESTIONS, YOU 
NEED TO CONSULT COUNSEL 
OF YOUR CHOICE. 


D-1-GV-1 1-001978 CON- 
STABLE’S NOTICE OF SALE 
REAL PROPERTY DELIN- 
QUENT TAXES 
BY VIRTUE of a certain Order 
Of Sale issued by the clerk 
of the 200th District Court of 
Travis County, on the 18th day 
of July, 2014 in a certain cause 
numbered D-1-GV-1 1-001978, 
wherein Travis County, Lago 
Vista Independent School Dis- 
trict, Travis County Healthcare 


District d/b/a Central Health, 
Water Control Improvement 
District-Point Venture, Travis 
County Emergency Services 
District No. 1 and Village of 
Point Venture are plaintiffs, 
and Vito L. Roccoforte, 

Nerissa S. Roccoforte and 
Point Venture Property Owners 
Association, Inc. (In Rem Only) 
are defendant(s), in favor of 
said plaintiffs, for the sum of 
$7,020.81 Dollars, together with 
all costs of suit, that being the 
amount of judgment recovered 
by the said plaintiffs, in the 
200th District Court of Travis 
County, Texas, on May 18, 2012. 
I, on the 31st day of July, 2014, 
at 2:00 o’clock P.M., have levied 
upon, and will, on the 2nd day 
of September, 2014 at 10:00 o’ 
clock, A.M., at 1000 Guadalupe 
Street in the City of Austin, 
within legal hours, proceed 
to sell for cash to the highest 
bidder, all the rights, title and 
interest of defendants in and 
to the following described 
property, levied upon as the 
property of defendants, to-wit: 
Lot 19, Point Venture Sec- 
tion One, Plat No. 48/70 as 
described in Volume 12956, 
Page 1214 of the deed records 
of Travis County, Texas. 

THE ABOVE SALE to be made 
by me to satisfy the above de- 
scribed judgment for $7,020.81 
Dollars in favor of plaintiffs, 
together with the costs of said 
suit, and the proceeds applied 
to the satisfaction thereof. 
Witness my hand this 31st day 
of July, 2014. 

CARLOS B. LOPEZ, 
CONSTABLE PRECINCT 5 
TRAVIS COUNTY, TEXAS 
BY/s/ Sergeant Alan Redd 
DEPUTY 

ON THE PROPERTY SOLD, 
THERE ARE NO WARRAN- 
TIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, 
INCLUDING, BUT NOT 
LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED 
WARRANTIES OF MERCHANT- 
ABILITY AND FITNESS FOR 
A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. 
YOU BUY THE PROPERTY “AS 
IS”. BIDDERS ARE FURTHER 
ADVISED THAT PURCHASE 
OF THE PROPERTY AT THIS 
EXECUTION SALE MAY NOT 
EXTINGUISH ANY LIENS OR 
SECURITY INTERESTS ON THE 
PROPERTY. YOU ARE SIMPLY 
PURCHASING WHATEVER 
INTEREST THE DEBTOR HAS 
IN THE PROPERTY. IF YOU 
HAVE ANY QUESTIONS, YOU 
NEED TO CONSULT COUNSEL 
OF YOUR CHOICE. 


D-1-GV-1 2-000595 CON- 
STABLE’S NOTICE OF SALE 
REAL PROPERTY DELIN- 
QUENT TAXES 
BY VIRTUE of a certain Order 
Of Sale issued by the clerk 
of the 53rd District Court of 
Travis County, on the 18th day 
of July, 2014 in a certain cause 
numbered D-1-GV-1 2-000595, 
wherein Travis County, 

Travis County Healthcare 
District d/b/a Central Health, 
Travis County Emergency 
Services District No. 1, City of 
Jonestown, Austin Community 
College and Leander Inde- 
pendent School District are 
plaintiffs, and William Thomas 
Miller, if alive and if deceased, 
the unknown owners, assigns, 
successors and heirs of the 
Estate of William Thomas 
Miller are defendant(s), in favor 
of said plaintiffs, for the sum 
of $29,540.61 Dollars, together 
with all costs of suit, that being 
the amount of judgment recov- 
ered by the said plaintiffs, in 
the 53rd District Court of Travis 
County, Texas, on October 
10 , 2012 . 

I, on the 31st day of July, 2014, 
at 2:00 o’clock P.M., have levied 
upon, and will, on the 2nd day 
of September, 2014 at 10:00 o’ 
clock, A.M., at 1000 Guadalupe 
Street in the City of Austin, 
within legal hours, proceed 
to sell for cash to the highest 
bidder, all the rights, title and 
interest of defendants in and 
to the following described 
property, levied upon as the 
property of defendants, to-wit: 
1.091 acres, more or less, out 
of the James A. Cox Sur. 54, 
said tract being that 0.53 acre 
tract as described in Volume 
6294, Page 1950 and that 0.990 
acre tract as described in Vol- 
ume 11689, Page 138, SAVE 
AND EXCEPT that 0.429 acre 
tract as described in docu- 
ment number 2000014781 of 
the deed records of Travis 
County, Texas. 

THE ABOVE SALE to be made 
by me to satisfy the above de- 
scribed judgment for $29,540.61 
Dollars in favor of plaintiffs, 
together with the costs of said 
suit, and the proceeds applied 


to the satisfaction thereof. 
Witness my hand this 31st day 
of July, 2014. 

CARLOS B. LOPEZ, 
CONSTABLE PRECINCT 5 
TRAVIS COUNTY, TEXAS 
BY/s/ Sergeant Alan Redd 
DEPUTY 

ON THE PROPERTY SOLD, 
THERE ARE NO WARRAN- 
TIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, 
INCLUDING, BUT NOT 
LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED 
WARRANTIES OF MERCHANT- 
ABILITY AND FITNESS FOR 
A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. 
YOU BUY THE PROPERTY “AS 
IS”. BIDDERS ARE FURTHER 
ADVISED THAT PURCHASE 
OF THE PROPERTY AT THIS 
EXECUTION SALE MAY NOT 
EXTINGUISH ANY LIENS OR 
SECURITY INTERESTS ON THE 
PROPERTY. YOU ARE SIMPLY 
PURCHASING WHATEVER 
INTEREST THE DEBTOR HAS 
IN THE PROPERTY. IF YOU 
HAVE ANY QUESTIONS, YOU 
NEED TO CONSULT COUNSEL 
OF YOUR CHOICE. 


D-1-GV-1 2-001 384 CONSTA- 
BLE’S NOTICE OF SALE 
REAL PROPERTY DELIN- 
QUENT TAXES 

BY VIRTUE of a certain Order 
Of Sale issued by the clerk of 
the 126TH District Court of 
Travis County, on the 22nd day 
of July, 2014 in a certain cause 
numbered D-1-GV-1 2-001 384, 
wherein Travis County, Lago 
Vista Independent School Dis- 
trict, Travis County Healthcare 
District d/b/a Central Health, 
Travis County Emergency 
Services District No. 1 and City 
of Lago Vista are plaintiffs, and 
Barry L. Wilson, and Mildred H. 
Wilson, if alive and if deceased, 
the unknown owners, heirs, 
assigns & successors of the 
Estate of Mildred H. Wilson 
are defendant(s), in favor of 
said plaintiffs, for the sum of 
$5,346.19 Dollars, together with 
all costs of suit, that being the 
amount of judgment recovered 
by the said plaintiffs, in the 
126TH District Court of Travis 
County, Texas, on March 3, 

2014. 

I, on the 31st day of July, 2014, 
at 2:00 o’clock P.M., have levied 
upon, and will, on the 2nd day 
of September, 2014 at 10:00 o' 
clock, A.M., at 1000 Guadalupe 
Street in the City of Austin, 
within legal hours, proceed 

to sell for cash to the highest 
bidder, all the rights, title and 
interest of defendants in and 
to the following described 
property, levied upon as the 
property of defendants, to-wit: 
Lot 11119, Bar-K Ranches Plat 

II, Plat No. 68/11 as described 
in Volume 11340, Page 612 

of the deed records of T ravis 
County, Texas. 

THE ABOVE SALE to be made 
by me to satisfy the above de- 
scribed judgment for $5,346.19 
Dollars in favor of plaintiffs, 
together with the costs of said 
suit, and the proceeds applied 
to the satisfaction thereof. 
Witness my hand this 31st day 
of July, 2014. 

CARLOS B. LOPEZ, 
CONSTABLE PRECINCT 5 
TRAVIS COUNTY, TEXAS 
BY /s/ Sergeant Alan Redd 
DEPUTY 

ON THE PROPERTY SOLD, 
THERE ARE NO WARRAN- 
TIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, 
INCLUDING, BUT NOT 
LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED 
WARRANTIES OF MERCHANT- 
ABILITY AND FITNESS FOR 
A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. 
YOU BUY THE PROPERTY “AS 
IS”. BIDDERS ARE FURTHER 
ADVISED THAT PURCHASE 
OF THE PROPERTY AT THIS 
EXECUTION SALE MAY NOT 
EXTINGUISH ANY LIENS OR 
SECURITY INTERESTS ON THE 
PROPERTY. YOU ARE SIMPLY 
PURCHASING WHATEVER 
INTEREST THE DEBTOR HAS 
IN THE PROPERTY. IF YOU 
HAVE ANY QUESTIONS, YOU 
NEED TO CONSULT COUNSEL 
OF YOUR CHOICE. 


D-1-GV-1 2-001 393 CONSTA- 
BLE’S NOTICE OF SALE 
REAL PROPERTY DELIN- 
QUENT TAXES 

BY VIRTUE of a certain Order 
Of Sale issued by the clerk 
of the 98TH District Court of 
Travis County, on the 18th day 
of July, 2014 in a certain cause 
numbered D-1-GV-1 2-001 393, 
wherein Travis County, Lago 
Vista Independent School Dis- 
trict, Travis County Healthcare 
District d/b/a Central Health, 
Travis County Emergency 
Services District No. 1 and City 
of Lago Vista are plaintiffs, 
and Alicia Valles De Garcia 
Torre, if alive and if deceased, 
the unknown owners, heirs. 


assigns and successors of the 
Estate of Alicia Valles de Garcia 
Torre are defendant(s), in favor 
of said plaintiffs, for the sum 
of $13,207.74 Dollars, together 
with all costs of suit, that 
being the amount of judgment 
recovered by the said plaintiffs, 
in the 98TH District Court of 
Travis County, Texas, on April 
11, 2014. 

I, on the 31st day of July, 2014, 
at 2:00 o’clock P.M., have levied 
upon, and will, on the 2nd day 
of September, 2014 at 10:00 o’ 
clock, A.M., at 1000 Guadalupe 
Street in the City of Austin, 
within legal hours, proceed 
to sell for cash to the highest 
bidder, all the rights, title and 
interest of defendants in and 
to the following described 
property, levied upon as the 
property of defendants, to-wit: 
Lot 20039, Highland Lake 
Estates Section Twenty, 

Plat No. 63/19 as described 
in Volume 8431, Page 404 of 
the deed records of T ravis 
County, Texas. 

THE ABOVE SALE to be made 
by me to satisfy the above de- 
scribed judgment for $13,207.74 
Dollars in favor of plaintiffs, 
together with the costs of said 
suit, and the proceeds applied 
to the satisfaction thereof. 
Witness my hand this 31st day 
of July, 2014. 

CARLOS B. LOPEZ, 
CONSTABLE PRECINCT 5 
TRAVIS COUNTY, TEXAS 
BY /s/ Sergeant Alan Redd 
DEPUTY 

ON THE PROPERTY SOLD, 
THERE ARE NO WARRAN- 
TIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, 
INCLUDING, BUT NOT 
LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED 
WARRANTIES OF MERCHANT- 
ABILITY AND FITNESS FOR 
A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. 
YOU BUY THE PROPERTY “AS 
IS”. BIDDERS ARE FURTHER 
ADVISED THAT PURCHASE 
OF THE PROPERTY AT THIS 
EXECUTION SALE MAY NOT 
EXTINGUISH ANY LIENS OR 
SECURITY INTERESTS ON THE 
PROPERTY. YOU ARE SIMPLY 
PURCHASING WHATEVER 
INTEREST THE DEBTOR HAS 
IN THE PROPERTY. IF YOU 
HAVE ANY QUESTIONS, YOU 
NEED TO CONSULT COUNSEL 
OF YOUR CHOICE. 


D-1-GV-1 2-001 566 CONSTA- 
BLE’S NOTICE OF SALE 
REAL PROPERTY DELIN- 
QUENT TAXES 

BY VIRTUE of a certain Order 
Of Sale issued by the clerk 
of the 261st District Court of 
Travis County, on the 18th day 
of July, 2014 in a certain cause 
numbered D-1-GV-1 2-001 566, 
wherein Travis County, Lago 
Vista Independent School Dis- 
trict, Travis County Healthcare 
District d/b/a Central Health, 
Travis County Emergency 
Services District No. 1 and City 
of Lago Vista are plaintiffs, and 
Herman Henry Riegel and La 
Vaughn Riegel, if alive and if 
deceased, the unknown own- 
ers, heirs, assigns & successors 
of the Estate of Herman Henry 
Riegel and La Vaughn Riegel 
are defendant(s), in favor of 
said plaintiffs, for the sum of 
$7,403.63 Dollars, together with 
all costs of suit, that being the 
amount of judgment recovered 
by the said plaintiffs, in the 
261st District Court of Travis 
County, Texas, on March 27, 
2013. 

I, on the 31st day of July, 2014, 
at 2:00 o’clock P.M., have levied 
upon, and will, on the 2nd day 
of September, 2014 at 10:00 o' 
clock, A.M., at 1000 Guadalupe 
Street in the City of Austin, 
within legal hours, proceed 
to sell for cash to the highest 
bidder, all the rights, title and 
interest of defendants in and 
to the following described 
property, levied upon as the 
property of defendants, to-wit: 
Lot 2375, Lago Vista Estates, 
Section Five, Plat No. 48/81 
as described in Volume 8767, 
Page 542 of the deed records 
of T ravis County, T exas. 

THE ABOVE SALE to be made 
by me to satisfy the above de- 
scribed judgment for $7,403.63 
Dollars in favor of plaintiffs, 
together with the costs of said 
suit, and the proceeds applied 
to the satisfaction thereof. 
Witness my hand this 31st day 



E AUSTIN CHRONICLE 87 


austinchronicle.com AUGUST 8, 2014 th 


LEGAL 

(ont. 


of July, 2014. 

CARLOS B. LOPEZ, 
CONSTABLE PRECINCTS 
TRAVIS COUNTY, TEXAS 
BY /s/ Sergeant Alan Redd 
DEPUTY 

ON THE PROPERTY SOLD, 
THERE ARE NO WARRAN- 
TIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, 
INCLUDING, BUT NOT 
LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED 
WARRANTIES OF MERCHANT- 
ABILITY AND FITNESS FOR 
A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. 
YOU BUY THE PROPERTY “AS 
IS". BIDDERS ARE FURTHER 
ADVISED THAT PURCHASE 
OF THE PROPERTY AT THIS 
EXECUTION SALE MAY NOT 
EXTINGUISH ANY LIENS OR 
SECURITY INTERESTS ON THE 
PROPERTY. YOU ARE SIMPLY 
PURCHASING WHATEVER 
INTEREST THE DEBTOR HAS 
IN THE PROPERTY. IF YOU 
HAVE ANY QUESTIONS, YOU 
NEED TO CONSULT COUNSEL 
OF YOUR CHOICE. 


D-1-GV-13-001112 CONSTA- 
BLE’S NOTICE OF SALE 
REAL PROPERTY DELIN- 


QUENT TAXES 

BY VIRTUE of a certain Order 
Of Sale issued by the clerk 
of the 419th District Court of 
Travis County, on the 18th day 
of July, 2014 in a certain cause 
numbered D-1-GV-13-001112, 
wherein Travis County, Lago 
Vista Independent School 
District, Travis County 
Healthcare District d/b/a 
Central Health, Travis County 
Emergency Services District 
No. 1 and City of Lago Vista are 
plaintiffs, and Roddy Williams 
are defendant(s), in favor of 
said plaintiffs, for the follow- 
ing sums: Billing Number 
48112 = $7,822.86 and Billing 
Number 62501 = $4,413.89 Dol- 
lars, together with all costs of 
suit, that being the amount of 
judgment recovered by the said 
plaintiffs, in the 419th District 
Court of Travis County, Texas, 
on January 17, 2014. 

I, on the 31st day of July, 2014, 
at 2:00 o’clock P.M., have levied 
upon, and will, on the 2nd day 
of September, 2014 at 10:00 o’ 
clock, A.M., at 1000 Guadalupe 
Street in the City of Austin, 
within legal hours, proceed 
to sell for cash to the highest 
bidder, all the rights, title and 
interest of defendants in and 
to the following described 
property, levied upon as the 
property of defendants, to-wit: 
Billing Number 48112 
Lot 11, Block S, Emerald 
Bend, Section One, Plat No. 
36/2 as described in Volume 


13306, Page 508 of the deed 
records of T ravis County, 
Texas 

Billing Number 62501 
Lot 35, Block C, Lago Vista, 
Section 3, Phase One, Plat 
No. 26/42 as described in 
Document number 1999002447 
of the deed records of T ravis 
County, Texas 
THE ABOVE SALE to be made 
by me to satisfy the above 
described judgment for the fol- 
lowing sums: Billing Number 
48112 = $7,822.86 and Billing 
Number 62501 = $4,413.89 
Dollars in favor of plaintiffs, 
together with the costs of said 
suit, and the proceeds applied 
to the satisfaction thereof. 
Witness my hand this 31st day 
of July, 2014. 

CARLOS B. LOPEZ, 
CONSTABLE PRECINCT 5 
TRAVIS COUNTY, TEXAS 
BY /s/ Sergeant Alan Redd 
DEPUTY 

ON THE PROPERTY SOLD, 
THERE ARE NO WARRAN- 
TIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, 
INCLUDING, BUT NOT 
LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED 
WARRANTIES OF MERCHANT- 
ABILITY AND FITNESS FOR 
A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. 
YOU BUY THE PROPERTY “AS 
IS”. BIDDERS ARE FURTHER 
ADVISED THAT PURCHASE 
OF THE PROPERTY AT THIS 
EXECUTION SALE MAY NOT 
EXTINGUISH ANY LIENS OR 
SECURITY INTERESTS ON THE 
PROPERTY. YOU ARE SIMPLY 
PURCHASING WHATEVER 
INTEREST THE DEBTOR HAS 
IN THE PROPERTY. IF YOU 
HAVE ANY QUESTIONS, YOU 
NEED TO CONSULT COUNSEL 
OF YOUR CHOICE. 


D-1-GV-93-003137 CON- 
STABLE’S NOTICE OF SALE 
REAL PROPERTY DELIN- 
QUENT TAXES 
BY VIRTUE of a certain Order 
Of Sale issued by the clerk of 
the 200TH District Court of 
Travis County, on the 18th day 
of July, 2014 in a certain cause 
numbered D-1-GV-93-003137, 
wherein Travis County, Lago 
Vista Independent School Dis- 
trict, Travis County Healthcare 
District d/b/a Central Health, 
Travis County Emergency 
Services District No. 1 and City 
of Lago Vista are plaintiffs, and 
J.K. Welch are defendant(s), 
in favor of said plaintiffs, for 
the sum of $4,605.77 Dollars, 
together with all costs of suit, 
that being the amount of 
judgment recovered by the said 
plaintiffs, in the 200TH District 
Court of Travis County, Texas, 
on September 21, 2012. 

I, on the 31st day of July, 2014, 
at 2:00 o’clock P.M., have levied 
upon, and will, on the 2nd day 
of September, 2014 at 10:00 o’ 
clock, A.M., at 1000 Guadalupe 
Street in the City of Austin, 
within legal hours, proceed 
to sell for cash to the highest 
bidder, all the rights, title and 
interest of defendants in and 
to the following described 
property, levied upon as the 
property of defendants, to-wit: 
Lot 4085, Bar-K Ranches, 

Plat Four, Plat No. 56/89 as 
described in Volume 8035, 
Page 715 of the deed records 
of Travis County, Texas. 

THE ABOVE SALE to be made 
by me to satisfy the above de- 
scribed judgment for $4,605.77 
Dollars in favor of plaintiffs, 
together with the costs of said 
suit, and the proceeds applied 
to the satisfaction thereof. 
Witness my hand this 31st day 
of July, 2014. 

CARLOS B. LOPEZ, 
CONSTABLE PRECINCT 5 
TRAVIS COUNTY, TEXAS 
BY /s/ Sergeant Alan Redd 
DEPUTY 

ON THE PROPERTY SOLD, 
THERE ARE NO WARRAN- 
TIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, 
INCLUDING, BUT NOT 
LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED 
WARRANTIES OF MERCHANT- 
ABILITY AND FITNESS FOR 
A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. 
YOU BUY THE PROPERTY “AS 
IS”. BIDDERS ARE FURTHER 
ADVISED THAT PURCHASE 
OF THE PROPERTY AT THIS 
EXECUTION SALE MAY NOT 
EXTINGUISH ANY LIENS OR 
SECURITY INTERESTS ON THE 
PROPERTY. YOU ARE SIMPLY 
PURCHASING WHATEVER 
INTEREST THE DEBTOR HAS 
IN THE PROPERTY. IF YOU 
HAVE ANY QUESTIONS, YOU 
NEED TO CONSULT COUNSEL 
OF YOUR CHOICE. 


Kristen Klein DBA 
(oudi Potato Austin 
is Making Applira- 

austinchronicle.com 


tion with the Texas 
Alcoholic Beverage 
Commission for a BF 
(Beer Retail Dealer’s 
Off-Premise License), 

Q (Wine Only Package 
Store Permit), and E 
(Local Cartage Permit) 
On the Address of 
5214 Burleson Rd. 
#406, Austin, Travis 
County, Texas. 

NOTICE OF ABANDONED 
VEHICLE(S) Pursuant to Texas 
Abandoned Motor Vehicle Act, 
the following vehicles will be 
sold at a public sale unless 
charges are satisfied within ten 
(10) days. Lone Star Towing 
VSF, 2305 W. Howard Ln., 
Austin, TX 78728. 

09 SATURN 1G8Z- 
V57B29F1 89090 
04 CAVALIER 
1G1JF52F1 47263444 

96 MAXIMA 
JN1CA21D0TT1 19356 
07 TAURUS 1FAF- 
P53U57A1 13664 

97 COUGAR 1MELM- 
6244VH616070 

94 MAZDA 1YVGE- 
22D2R5151122 
04 PONTIAC 
1G2NF52F94M532336 

98 GRAND PRIX1G2WP- 
12K6WF234860 

02 RANGER 1FTYR14U- 
12PA51867 

98 EXPLORER 1FMZU32P- 
P0WZC09035 
93 STEALTH JB3BM44H- 
5PY020228 


NOTICE OF ABANDONED 
VEHICLES 

Pursuant to the Texas Aban- 
doned Motor Vehicle Act, the 
following vehicles will be sold 
at a public sale if not claimed 
within 15 days. 
Garagekeeper: 

Big A Vehicle T ransport 
907 McPhaul St. 

Austin, TX 78758 
(512) 873-7899 
TDLR VSF Lie. No 0584855 
2013 Ford Van 1FTNE2E- 
W1DDA66779, chgs. $503.10 
1993 Buick2G4WB- 
54TOP1440672, chgs. $503.10 
2001 Toyota 

JTDBT1 2321 01 98210, chgs. 
$503.10 


NOTICE OF NEW TRAF- 
FIC REGULATION Notice 
is hereby given that Travis 
County, Texas, proposes the 
approval of the following traffic 
regulation: SET MAXIMUM 
PRIMA FACIE SPEED LIM- 
ITS ON LAKEHURST ROAD 
IN PRECINCT THREE. 

Any resident of Travis County, 
Texas, aggrieved by this pro- 
posal action may make written 
request for a mandatory public 
hearing. 

Such request must be ad- 
dressed to the Transportation 
and Natural Resources Depart- 
ment, Travis County, Texas, 
78767, and must be received 
within seven (7) days of this 
notice. 


NOTICE OF PUBLIC 
AUCTION 

Pursuant to Chapter 59, Texas 
Property Code, Austin Self 
Storage which is located at 
1409 West Oltorf Austin Texas 
78704 will hold a public auction 
of property being sold to satisfy 
a landlord’s lien. The sale will 
be held September 3 at 10am 
at 1409 West Oltorf Austin TX 
78704. 

Property will be sold to the 
highest bidder for cash. 

Deposit for removal and 
cleanup may be temporarily 
required. Seller reserves the 
right to nmot accept any bed 
and to withdraw the property 
from sale. Property includes 
house hold goods and boxes 
of assorted itmes and one food 
trailer(cart). The units listed are 
up for bidding 
#136 Jerry Edmiston 
parki Sujoy Ganguly 
#26 Craig Allen 
#25 Sarah Eckert Campaign 
#82 Joshua Cannada 
#111 William Kemp 
#162 William Kemp 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUC- 
TION In accordance with the 
provisions of State Law, there 
being due and unpaid charges 
for which the undersigned is 
entitled to satisfy an owner 


AV910 POUND SALE 

NOTICE OF SALE OF MOTOR VEHICLES 
IMPOUNDED BY ORDER OF THE CHIEF OF 
POLICE IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 
683.011 ET SEQ., TEXAS TRANSPORTATION 
CODE, REGULATING THE IMPOUNDING 
AND SALE OF ABANDONED VEHICLES BY 
DELEGATE OR PERSONALLY. 

THE PURCHASER SHALL TAKE TITLE TO 
THE MOTOR VEHICLE FREE AND CLEAR OF 
ALL LIENS AND CLAIMS OF OWNERSHIP 
AND IS ENTITLED TO REGISTER THE 
PURCHASED MOTOR VEHICLE AND 
RECIEVE A CERTIFICATE OF TITLE. 

I WILL PROCEED TO SELL AT PUBLIC 
AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR 
CASH IN THE CITY OF AUSTIN, TRAVIS 
COUNTY, TEXAS, THE FOLLOWING 
DESCRIBED MOTOR VEHICLES WHICH 
HAVE NOT BEEN REDEEMED BY THE 
OWNERS, THEREOF TO WIT; 

SEPTEMBER 10,2014 @ 9:30 AM 
©SOUTHSIDE WRECKER, 

8200 S. CONGRESS, AUSTIN, TX 78745 


145032692 

2002 

DODG 

4DR 


TX 

2B3HD46R22H212810 

145032688 

1985 

MERC 

4DR 


TX 

1MEBP95F3FZ609804 

145032684 

2004 

HMDE 

TRAL 

19043N 

TX 


145032145 

1996 

FORD 

VN 

Z22MFX 

TX 

1FDEE14HXTHA67266 

145032143 

2003 

MITS 

4DR 

T59PMV 

TX 

4A3AA46G73E096565 

145031445 

1999 

FORD 

LL 

BCB6524 

TX 

1FMPU18L1XLA99181 

145032700 

1994 

NISS 

4DR 

JMVZ29 

TX 

JN1EB31P5RU317505 

145030875 

1996 

FORD 

PK 

99CNH1 

TX 

1FTCR10AXTUB94163 

145030885 

1998 

MAZD 

4DR 

BVS0670 

TX 

1YVGF22C0W5729864 


SS THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE AUGUST 8, 2014 


and/or manager’s lien of the 
goods hereinafter described 
and stored at the Uncle Bob’s 
Self Storage location(s) listed 
below. 

And, due notice having been 
given, to the owner of said 
property and all parties known 
to claim an interest therein, 
and the time specified in such 
notice for payment of such 
having expired, the goods will 
be sold at public auction at 
the below stated location(s) 
to the highest bidder for cash 
or otherwise disposed of on 
August 19th, 2014 at 8:00AM 
starting at the Hwy 290E loca- 
tion, immediately thereafter, 
auction proceeds to the next 
listed location. 

Uncle Bobs Self Storage #285 
9717 US Hwy 290E, Austin, 

TX 78724 
512-278-1220 

Henry Stewart - hsid gds/furn, 

tools/appinces 

Dewanda Wilson - hsid gds/ 

turn, tools/appinces 

Nessie Harrison - hsid gds/furn, 

tv/stereo equip, boxes 

Percy A Moorehouse - hsid 

gds/furn, tv/stereo equip, tools/ 

appinces, 

Gisela Chapa - hsid gds/furn 
Shelley Ewing - hsid gds/furn 
Robert Lang - hsid gds/furn, 
tools/appinces 

Uncle Bobs Self Storage #276 
2830 South A.W. Grimes 
Boulevard, Round Rock, TX 
78664 

512-310-0279 

Diane Young - Hsid Gds, 

Furn, Boxes, Tools, Off Furn, 
Lndsepng Equip; 

Micro Construction Group 
- Tools/Appinces, Off Furn/ 
Mach/Equip; 

Laura Daily - Hsid Gds, Furn, 
Boxes, Sprtng Gds, Tools, 
Appinces, TV/Stereo Equip, Off 
Furn, Off Mach/Equip, Acetng 
Rerds; 

Brenda Molinar - Hsid Gds, 
Furn, Boxes, Sprtng Gds, Ap- 
pinces, TV/Stereo Equip; 
Stephanie Seabolt- Hsid Gds/ 
Furn, Tools/Appinces; 

Malaka Lowery- Hsid Gds, Furn, 
Boxes, TV/Stereo Equip; 

Diane Young - Tools, Cabinets, 
Bikes, Garage, Christmas; 
Melissa Williams - Hsid Gds/ 
Furn, TV/Stereo Equip; 

Robert Alexander - Hsid Gds, 
Furn, Boxes, Tools, Acetng 
Rerds; 

Rolin Davis - Hsid Gds/Furn; 
Norma Shelnutt - Hsid Gds/ 
Furn, TV/Stereo Equip, Off 
Furn, Tools/ Appinces; 

Ronald Thomas - Hsid Gds/ 
Furn, Tools/Appinces; 

Gerardo Gonzales - Hsid Gds/ 
Furn, TV/Stereo Equip, Tools/ 
Appinces; 

Torn! Rodgers - Hsid Gds, Furn, 
Boxes, Sprtng Gds, Appinces, 
TV/Stereo Equip, Off Furn, Off 
Mach/Equip; 

Uncle Bobs Self Storage #430 
2101 Double Creek Dr, Round 
Rock, TX 78664 
512-733-1203 

Jenny Rodgers - Hsid gds, 

Furn, Tools/Appinces, TV/ 
Stereo Equip, Off Furn, Off 
mach/equip 

Uncle Bobs Self Storage #446 
1515 North AW Grimes, 

Round Rock, TX 78665 
512-310-2224 

Chaz Allen Gerumbles - Hsid 
gds/Furn, Off furn/mach/equip. 
Boxes, Sporting Equipment 
Brandon Carl - Hsid gds/ 

Furn, TV/Stereo Equip, Tools/ 
appinces 

Stephanie McCallister- Hsid 
gds/Furn 

Jeffrey Hollon - Hsid gds/Furn, 
Boxes, Bins 

Joe Horn - Hsid gds/Furn 
Buddy Anthony Franco - Hsid 
gds/Furn, Boxes 
Jaylen Cook - Hsid gds/Furn 
Ashlee McKenzie - Hsid gds/ 
Furn 

Uncle Bobs Self Storage #392 
550 S. IH-35, Round Rock, 

TX 78681 
512-238-6648 

Carlton Norfleet- Hsid gds/ 

Furn, TV/Stereo Equip, Tools/ 
Appinces 

Juana Dominguez- Hsid gds/ 
Furn 

Jamayla Burse- Hsid gds/Furn 

Uncle Bobs Self Storage #427 
3997 FM 1431, Round Rock, 

TX 78681 
512-255-5017 

Jason Landry- Hsid gds, furn 
John Mosteller- Hsid gds, furn 
Diana Fish- Hsid gds, furn, 
boxes, other 

Goldie Van Gulden- Hsid gds, 
furn, tv/stereo equip 

Uncle Bobs Self Storage #382 
309 S. Bell Blvd, Cedar Park, 
TX 78613 
512-336-2463 

Ryan Pincham- Hsid gds/Furn, 
Tools/Appinces, Lndsepng/ 
Cnstrctn equip 

Jessica Miller- Hsid gds/Furn, 


Tools/Appinces, Boxes 

Uncle Bobs Self Storage #197 
5547 McNeil Dr. Austin, TX 
78729 

512-336-8390 

Terrence Moorer - Hsid gds/ 
Furn 

Pamela Woodward -Hsid gds/ 
Furn 

Raynel Beall -Hsid gds/Furn, 

Off Furn/Mach/Equip, Acetng 
rcrds/Sales Sampis, Clothes 
Stacy Fowler - Hsid gds/Furn, 
Tools/Appinces 
Stan West - Hsid gds/Furn, TV/ 
Stereo Equip, Boxes 
Dewisley Woods - Hsid gds/ 
Furn, TV/Stereo Equip 
Camilla Carter - Hsid gds/ 

Furn, Tools/Appinces, Off Furn/ 
Mach/Equip 

Micaela Garza-Flores - Hsid 
gds, Tools/AppInces.Lndscpng/ 
Cnstrctn Equip 
Christonna Scarbrough - Hsid 
gds/Furn, Tools/Appinces 
Joel Ray - Hsid gds/Furn, 
Tools/Appinces, Off Furn/ 
Mach/Equip 

Uncle Bobs Self Storage #390 
12835 Pond Springs Rd, 
Austin, TX 78729 
512-250-5152 

Rich Powell- Hsid gds, furn 
Rich Powell- Hsid gds, furn 
Kody Swenson- Hsid gds, furn 
Sammie Carpenter- Hsid 
gds, furn 

Lauren Brauel- Hsid gds, furn 
Liz Taylor- Hsid gds, furn 

Uncle Bobs Self Storage #231 
8227 N. Lamar Blvd, Austin, 
TX 78753 
512-833-0855 

Albert Peralta- Boxes, TV/ 
Stereo Equip, Tools, Acetng 
rerds. Other 

Katie Adams-Other;Boxes 
Alicia Cruz- Hsid gds/Furn 
Nathan Carlton-Hsid gds/Furn 
Arline Hernandez- Hsid gds/ 
Furn 

Uncle Bob’s Self Storage 
#287 

6509 S. 1st St. Austin,TX 
78745 

512-326-3131 

Huey Walker-Hsid gds, furn 
Joseph D Bogdon-Hsid gds, 
furn,TV/stereo equip 
Jessica Johnson-Hsid gds, 
furn, TV/stereo equip, tools, 
appinces, boxes 
Gloria Carmona-Hsid gds, furn, 
boxes, sprtng gds 
Dosey Mitchell-Hsid gds, furn 
Brian Schneider-Tools, ap- 
pinces, boxes 
Jeremy S Carmeron-Hsid 
gds, furn 

Kathrine E Mayo-Hsid gds, 
furn,TV/stereo equip 
Felicia Francis-Hsid gds, furn 

Uncle Bob’s Self Storage 
#445 

9706 Manchaca Rd. Austin, 

TX 78748 
512-291-1037 

Moses Calderon- Hsid gds/ 
Furn, TV/Stereo Equip, Bins 
Kelly Keasler-Hsid gds/Furn 
Maria Coleman-Furn, Boxes 
Marylynn P Awater-Hsid gds/ 
Furn, Boxes, Outdoor Equip- 
ment, Rocks 

Herther Moore-Hsid gds/Furn 
Beau Harris-Furn 


NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF 
PERSONAL PROPERTY 

Extra Space Storage, pursuant 
to Chapter 59 of the Texas 
Property Code (Chapter 576 
of the 68th Legislature), will 
conduct a public sale of the 
contents of the units listed to 
satisfy delinquent accounts 
(landlords lien). These 
sales will be conducted on 
Wednesday August 27, 2014 
beginning at 2:00 pm at 6512 
McNeil Dr, Austin, TX 78729. 
All sales are final, goods are 
sold as is. Landlords reserve 
the right to refuse any bid. 

Cash only sales to the highest 
bidder. Viewing from the 
entrance only. Buyers must re- 
move all the contents and leave 
the unit clean. Persons age 16 
and under are not permitted on 
the grounds. 

6512 McNeil Dr. 512-250-9879 
FI 15-Caleb Sanchez 
C105-Megan Salinas 

12506 N. Lamar Blvd. 512- 
339-6856 

A061 -Michael Ray Johansen 
B049-Antoinette Chambers 
B184-Maria Celia Gonzalez 
B033-Sarah N Ngigi 
C008-Crystal M Ray 
B142-Brittney Morgan 


Rodriguez 

B159-Sunday Samuel 
C004-Shirley Ann Franklin 
C042-Traeshina Williams 
C145-Stephanie L Veioz 
A169-Lauren Garcia 
C185-Camille L Atkins 
B01 8-Josh E Bryant 
B090-Daraline Washington 
B124-Tanya Lashawn Austin 
B278-Julie A Busch 
C256-Frederick M Provost 
Cl 39-Cealia Thompson 
C219-Allegra Caprece Jackson 
A002-Cynthia B Lothery 
6412 Burnet Rd. 512-419-0647 
401 1 -Rebecca Zabodyn 
1055-Johnny Sanders 
The items stored in the above 
listed units and/or spaces are 
typical household goods and 
may include, but are not limited 
to: office equipment, supplies, 
stored files and records, house- 
hold and office furnishings, 
inventory, tools, equipment, 
and miscellaneous items. May 
include autos, boats, campers 
as noted. Auctioneer -Ace Auc- 
tion Company TX-1 6453. 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE of 

property to satisfy landlord’s 
lien. Sale is 10:00am August 
15, 2014. Property will be sold 
to highest bidder for cash at 
the time of auction. Cleanup 
and removal deposit may be 
required. Seller reserves right 
to withdraw property from 
sale or not accept any bidder. 
Property will be sold in entire 
contents of each individual 
storage unit. Property includes 
contents of spaces of following 
tenants: Carmen Alvarez, Kevin 
Barnes, Christopher Bogart, 
Robert Hayse, Monica Hernan- 
dez, Aaron Morneault, Jenny 
Pomeroy, Ladis Slavik, Emily 
Tanaka, Germanie Williams. 
Property being sold includes 
the following: head boards, 
ladder, weight benches, 
work benches, bikes, toys, 
microwave, tool box, rocking 
chair, beds, shelves, blankets, 
clothes, boxes, lamps, couches, 
baby crib, elliptical work out 
equipment, entertainment 
center, mirrors, clothes, stove, 
fridge, golf cart, car parts, com- 
puter parts, tools, suit cases, 
back packs, sleeping bag, 
wooden Indian and misc. items. 
Contact Lockaway Storage 9910 
Slaughter Creek Dr., Austin, 

TX, 78748. 512-282-7807 


NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE of 

property to satisfy landlord’s 
lien. Sale is on August 15, 2014 
at 12:00 pm. Property will be 
sold to highest bidder for cash 
at the time of auction. Cleanup 
& removal deposit may be 
required. Seller reserves right 
to withdraw property from 
sale or not accept any bidder. 
Property will be sold in entire 
contents of each individual 
storage unit. Property includes 
contents of spaces of following 
tenants: Vanessa Nation & 
Jose A Jaimes-Fernandez. 
Property being sold includes 
the following: bike, luggage, & 
misc household items. Contact 
Lockaway Storage: 12408 
Harris Branch Parkway, Manor, 
Tx. 78653 


NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE 

PS Orangeco, Inc., hereby 
gives notice that the property 
generally described below is 
being sold to satisfy a Land- 
lord’s Lien pursuant to Chapter 
59 of the Texas Property Code, 
at the date and time indicated 
below, and on the following 
terms: All property will be sold 
at public sale to the highest 
bidder for cash or credit cards, 
NO CHECKS, with payment to 
be made at the time of the sale. 
Seller reserves the right to 
refuse any bid and to withdraw 
any item or items from the sale. 
The property stored therein 
may include, but are not 
limited to general household 
items, appliances, boxes, bags, 
totes, tools, bedding, clothing, 
electronics, toys, books, files, 
furniture and miscellaneous 
items. 

The property will be sold on the 
28th and 29th of August 2014, 
on or about the time indicated 
at each self-storage facility 
identified below. No Children 
Please. No Smoking Please. 
Thursday, August 28th, 2014. 
9:30 a.m. Public Storage @ 
9814 Westgate Blvd, Austin, 


TX 78748 

0048 - Dickson, Carla 
0329 -Willaby, John 
0339 - Montoya, Robert 
0343 - Dinscore, Jason 
0361 - drewy, lakreasha 

0410 - Nelson, Michael 

041 1 - Guzman, Ricardo 
0417 - Wilhelm, Jackson 
0466 - Williams, Ross 
0523 - Hicham, Thalya 

0529 - Uribe, Savas 
0546 - reed, rebecca 
0569 - Nolen, Cynthia 
11:00 a.m. Public Storage 
@ 7200 S 1st Street. Austin, 
TX 78745 

A011 - Morton, Sonia 

D099 - Sawyer, Frank 

E136 - Carlson, Jeremy 

F172 - Davis, Anjiia 

F174 - Carson, Julia 

F175 - Horne, Linda 

J268 - Williamson, Matthew 

K287 - Smith, Michael 

K297 - Golden, Ashley 

L345 - McMillen, Brian 

M374 - Goodson, Randy 

N431 - Trejo, Justin 

0465 - Watkins, Samuel 

P474 - Michael, Shawn 

0500 - Mercado, Josie 

S560 - taylor, mara 

S586 - Garcia, Andres 

T603 - Flores, Martin 

U656 - Oneal, Jamiya 

U665 - Allen, Cathy 

V707 - Alonzo, Maria 

V721 - Steele, Valerie 

V742 - Williams, Denise 

W779 - Banda, Emily 

W786 - Alfaro, Lisbeth 

1:00 p.m. Public Storage @ 

7112 South Congress, Austin, 

TX 78745 

C21 - Ekrut, James 

C3 - Hernandez, Paloma 

C31 - Radecki, Kara 

E20 - Perez, Christopher 

FI - Patrick, Johnny 

G25 - Thomas, Donald 

H3 - Davidson, London 

J42 - Garcia, Richard 

K16-Williston SR, John 

K51 - Dunaway, Ronald 

K53 - Benitez, Nelson 

K54 - amador, Luis 

L5 - Trevino, Rene 

L51 - Jones, Robert 

M45 - Macias, Michelle 

Friday, August 29th, 2014 

9:30 a.m. Public Storage @ 

4202 Santiago, Austin, TX 

78745 

136 - Bailey, Shayle 

144 - Roberts, Anita 

151 - Lugo, Ronnie 

171 - Cobern, Heather 

180- Wilkins, Teri 

318 - Bardin-Didway, Nema 

354 - Williams, Merita 

373 - Lancaster, Sue 

395 -Guill, Autry 

406 - Cantu, Ernestina 

414 - Lona, Martin 

425 - Humphrey, Brandon 

500 - Solis, John 

530 - Rivas, Carlos 
549 - Powell, Christian 
558 - Williams, Jonathan 
627 - Bass, Craig 

631 - Mancilla, Crystal D 
639 - Bardin-Didway, Nema 
649 - Hendrix, Michael 
716 - Pruneda, Cuquita 
764 - Warg, Tracy 
10:30 a.m. Public Storage 
@ 2301 E Ben White, Austin, 
TX 78741 

1125 - Orta, Monica 
2001 - Randolph, Anthony 
3204 - Vasquez, Raymond 
3206 - Holley, Kelly 

11:00 a.m. Public Storage 
@ 5016 E Ben White, Austin, 
TX 78741 

C067 - Roper, Cheryl 

C071 - Burney, Michael 

C075 - Foley, Eddie 

C078 - hershman, howard 

C089 - Schwartz, John 

C108 - Villegas, Adrian 

Cl 30 - Perez, Mary 

Cl 39 - Ledesma, Laura 

C247 - Kizzie, Tekisha 

C260 - Ochoa, Abel 

D006 - Blair, Scott 

E011 - Gutierrez, Ashley 

12:00 p.m. Public Storage @ 

2121 S IH 35, Austin, TX 78741 

1025 - Sutherland, Karen 

1085 - Odum, Vivian 

2094 - Yoder, Caroline 

3059 - Avelar, Juan 

3064 - Sanders, Roderick 

3093 - Castro, Julie 

4106 - Serna, Desiree 

4116 - Davila, Asdrubal 

4157 -Mitchell, Robert 

1:00 p.m. Public Storage @ 

5220 W Hwy 290, Austin, TX 

78735 

1502 - Benton, Miranda 
3008 - St Pierre, Jacquelyn 
3010- HOOD, JOHN 
3022 - Glenn, Sharon 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE 

PS Orangeco, Inc., hereby 
gives notice that the property 
generally described below is 
being sold to satisfy a Land- 
lord’s Lien pursuant to Chapter 
59 of the Texas Property Code, 
at the date and time indicated 
below, and on the following 
terms: All property will be sold 


at public sale to the highest 
bidder for cash or credit cards, 
NO CHECKS, with payment to 
be made at the time of the sale. 
Seller reserves the right to 
refuse any bid and to withdraw 
any item or items from the sale. 
The property stored therein 
may include, but are not 
limited to general household 
items, appliances, boxes, bags, 
totes, tools, bedding, clothing, 
electronics, toys, books, files, 
furniture and miscellaneous 
items. 

The property will be sold on the 
25th and 26th of August 2014, 
on or about the time indicated 
at each self-storage facility 
identified below. No Children 
Please. No Smoking Please. 
Monday, August 25th, 2014. 
9:30 a.m. Public Storage @ 
8101 N. Lamar Blvd., Austin, 
TX 78753 

1043 -Triplett, Shelia 
1218 - Moore, Daniel Olvera 
125 - Bush, Freddie 

1320 - McLain, Brandi 
1422 - McCreight, April 
1510 - Brooks, Felicia 

187 - Koch Jr., Kenneth Edward 
2006 - Garcia, Nicholas 
2010- Blocker, Sally 
2087 - Bierman, Jessica 
2135 - Lopez Cruz, Yolanda D 
249 - Lachnit, Amy 
3030 - Thompson, Nick 
3035 - Rodriquez, Melanie 
3067 - Lee, Loretta 
3069 - Linscomb, Jordan 
431 - Castillo, Jennifer 

504 - Amaya, Issac 
525 - Gonsalez, Mary R 
N1251 - Carr, Shannon 
N1339 - moore, nakisha 
N1387 - Philpr, Robert 
N1390 - Alvarez, Matthew 
N2281 - Klaff, Benjamin G. 
N2401 - Ignite Inc 
N3334 - Johnson, Destiny 

1 1 :00 a.m. Public Storage @ 
8525 N. Lamar Blvd., Austin, 
TX 78753 
A013 - dixon, shah 
A019 - Jones Iv, Merrit 
A023 - Evans, Leon 
A037 - Saucedo, Juana 
A044 - Parker, Lorenzo 
A062 - Mansion, Dawanna 
A075 - Davis, Samuel 
A094 - Thompson, Rose 
B005 - Mireles, Jerry 
C009 - Fidis, Anthony 
C064 - ANAYA, ERICK 
C072 - Steam, Gerald 
C079 - Coleman, Andrea 
D001 - Tawater, Amanda Leann 
E022 - Trejo, Patty Ann 
E043 - Shields, Marlin 
E046 - Washington, Charles 
F013 - camp discover 
G012 - Martinez, Tessa 
1 :00 p.m. Public Storage @ 
8128 N. Lamar Blvd., Austin, 
TX 78753 

B005 - ZAVALA, JOSE 
C029 - Brown, Gwendolyn 
D029 - Gordon Williams, 
Stephen 

D040 - Archie, Lafayette 
D048 - Borge, Martha 
D051 - Webster, Erica 
D063 - Hopkins, Raymond 
E028 - Greathouse, Kira 
E048 - Calderon, Yvonne 
E077 - Jaimes, Elpidia 
El 09 - Garza, Diamantina 
F049 - Davis, Samuel 
G001 - Locke, Robert 
G003 - Pennington, Menyon 
G053 - Madding, Clifford 
Tuesday, August 26th, 2014 
9:30 a.m. Public Storage @ 
1033 E.41st Street, Austin, 

TX 78751 

3050 - Belvin, Sonya 
3106 - Jaimes Jr., David 0. 

4089 - Carpenter, Marissa 

4192 - Maxwell, Maisheri 

5013 - Taylor-Simpkins, Belinda 

5094 - mcmillan, harold 

5174 - Hite, Marie 

10:30 a.m. Public Storage 

@ 937 Reinli Street, Austin, 

TX 78751 

121 - Hearn, Kisha 

134 - Stewart, Jennifer 

135 - Pesina, Linda 
182 - smith, marcus 

214 - Armstrong, Shakea 
248 - Tolden, Nathan 
301 - Smith, Carl 
312 -Bradford, Whitney 
395 - Kelly, Melisaer 
423 - Edwards, Kathleen 
453 - Diaby, Naksatou 
455 - Gilmore, Tara 

505 - Winston, Nakia 
510 - Avila, Leticia 
529 - NuMotion 

543 - Hart, Linda G 

631 - Jones, Shatara 

703 - Bell, Lorenzo 

724 - Oliver, Darren 

738 - baker, thelisa 

743 - White, Seaghn 

770 - Roberts, Linda 

111 - Daniels, Karen 

912 - Deleon, Matthew 

1 1 :30 a.m. Public Storage @ 

1213 W. 6th Street, Austin, 

TX 78703 

2003 - Hernandez, Claudia 
2026 - Black, Michael 
3003 - Kerr, Scott 
4065 - Neas, Matthews 
5140 - Wade, Charles 
12:30 p.m. Public Storage @ 

1321 W. 5th Street, Austin, 


TX 78703 

A119 - Dennis, James 
A215 - Galyon, Jonathon 
A241 - Wade, Charles 
A266 - Kagak, Jeremy 
A270 - Ojeda, Trinidad 
A408 - Galyon, Jonathon 
B213 - COLEMAN, SUZANNE 
B227 - COLEMAN, SUZANNE 
1 :30 p.m. Public Storage @ 
6726 Bee Cave Rd., Austin, 
TX 78746 

1042 - Vincent, Gregory J 
4032 - Palmer, Christie E. 

7062 - Ferguson, Carrie 
2:00 p.m. Public Storage @ 
3911 RR620 S., Bee Cave, 
Texas 78738 

1211 - Moore, Jeff 

1212 - Buckner, Komanski 
1302 - Sholtis, Rosemary 
1329 - Zepeda, Regulo 


NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE 

PS Orangeco, Inc., hereby 
gives notice that the property 
generally described below is 
being sold to satisfy a Land- 
lord's Lien pursuant to Chapter 
59 of the Texas Property Code, 
at the date and time indicated 
below, and on the following 
terms: All property will be sold 
at public sale to the highest 
bidder for cash or credit cards, 
NO CHECKS, with payment to 
be made at the time of the sale. 
Seller reserves the right to 
refuse any bid and to withdraw 
any item or items from the sale. 
The property stored therein 
may include, but are not 
limited to general household 
items, appliances, boxes, bags, 
totes, tools, bedding, clothing, 
electronics, toys, books, files, 
furniture and miscellaneous 
items. 

The property will be sold on the 
27th of Aug 2014, on or about 
the time indicated at each 
self-storage facility identified 
below. No Children Please. 
Wednesday 29, 2014 
08415 - 9:30 a.m. Public Stor- 
age® 1517 Round Rock Ave. 
Round Rock, TX 78681 
0927 - Gonzalez, Aaron 
1 142 - Francis, Marlowe 
1 157 - Williams, Robert 
1172 - Bryant, Jesse 
2109 - Blevins, Shauna 
4109 - Diaz, Salomon 
4122 - Gonzalez, Aaron 
4144 - Deshay, Marian 
5105 - Mangan, Wendy 
5109 - Marine, Ray 

5118 - Jefferson, Donna 

5119 - Mayweather-Lewis, 
Marzette 

7107- Edna G’S 
7120 - Cryer, Jonathan 
7142- Wright, Dustin 
8122 - Pham, Cuong 
8139 - Soliz, Javier 
8144 - Salinas, Rudy 
9131 - Ward, Ronald 
21607 - 10 a.m. Public Stor- 
age® 10100 North l-H 35 
Austin, TX 78753 
A001 - Sanchez-Burris, Kasara 
A002 - Hodges, Renee 
A005 - Gamez, Norma 
A035 - Fresch, Darrell 
B009 - Tod, Patrick 
B012 - Mata, Teresa 
B022 - Hernandez, Cynthia 
B044 - Brown, Courtney 
B082 - Winscher, Robert 
B113 - Paige, Lawrence 
C001 - Hill, Yvette 
C002 - Ker, Jerobbin 
C005 - Martinez, Alicia 
C021 - Pounds, Jaime 
C027 - Landez, Lionel 
C059 - Matias, Mary 
C099 - Baker, Darin 
D029 - Galindo, Ysabel 
D066 - Rzasa, Mark 
D077 - Nash, Joe 
D080 - De Los Santos, Leticia 
D091 - Bailey, Meoshi 
D081 - Lopez, Laura 
D089 - Spencer, Brenda 
D100 - Harrison, Brandon 
D1 13 - Castelan, Shannon 
D141 - JONES, PHILLIP 
E051 - Brokaw, Cody 
E053 - Jackson, Herman 
F003 - Bailey, Shermeka 
F007 - Rubio, Jose 
F010 - Jewett, Tony 
G009 - Powell, Deseria 
G010 - Aekins, Munya 
H004 - Bragg, Shelia 
H014 - Harrison, Scott 
08451 - 10:30 a.m. Public Stor- 
age® 10001 N. l-H 35 Austin, 
TX 78753 

1 039 - Alexander, Daphne 
1057 - Martinez, Leslie 
1059 - Fowler, Donovan 
1061 - Chavez, Christina 
2053 - Severin, Tony 
2055 - Castro, Alfred 
2082 - Gordon, Brent 
2088 - Mitchell, Tracy 
3039 - Duran Arrendondo, 
Enrique 

3047 - Singleton, Carolyn 

3048 - Singleton, Carolyn 
3068 - Garrison, Laura 
3096 - Lomax, Armellia 
4006 - Lopez, Jose 

4016 - Moore, Audri 

4021 - Vonach, Catherine 

5003 - Russell, Derek 

5038 - Garrison, Laura 

5075 - Brown, Ashala Cajamir- 

ror 

7021 - Baker, Warren 

9012 - Eusebio, Rogelio-Miguel- 


Estra 

9027 - cedar view health care 
28224- 11 a.m. Public 
Storage® 12318 N. Mopac 
Expressway Austin, TX 78758 
A019 - Franklin, Jasmine 
A074 - Sanderson, Bronwyn 
A094 - PADDOCK, MICHELLE 
B211 - Fisher-Jones, Marvin 
B265 - Fresenius Medical Care 
C300 - Paxton, Aaron 
C364 - Glass, Brian 
D505 - Davila, Ronald 
D548 - Broadus, lesha 
D586 - Owens, Etta 
D649 - Evans, Brittany 
23709 - 11:30 a.m. Public Stor- 
age® 9205 Research Blvd. 
Austin, TX 78758 
A021 - Roth, David 
A043 - Robbins, Tammy 
A212- ROSS, RUTH 
A308 - Olson, Ryan 
B019 - Reza, Michael 
B078 - Jones, Rhonda 
C003 - Baker, Tonya 
Cl 00 - Floyd, Chesalon 
D029 - White, Margaret 
D057 - Olson, Bradley 
D1 12 - Taylor, Robert 
E014 - Bible, Johnathan 
E021 - Roberts, Michelle 
E160 - Adamchick, Peter 
E163-Hull, Lisa 
E164 - Washington, Larson 
20199 -12 p.m. Public Stor- 
age® 10931 Research blvd. 
Austin, TX 78759 
2047 - Guerrero, Adrian 
2130 - Leshakova, Zhenya 
2173 - Bary, Amanda 
2290 - Bernier, Maeghan 
07002 - 12:30 p.m. Public Stor- 
age® 12915 Research Blvd. 
Austin, TX 78750 
1011 - Ladwig, Brian 
4020 - McCraine, Eldon 
4038 - Lara, Arron 
4055 - Goodwin, Rickey 
4065 - White, Thomas 
5007 - Kirby, Katelyn 
D016 - Kouragian, Jennifer 
D017 - RICHARDS, PATRICK 
08428 - 1 p.m. Public Stor- 
age® 13675 N US HWY183 
Austin, TX 78750 
0214 - Hetherington, Jim 
0223 - Hickman, Roxanne 
0323 - Bergeron, John 
0421 -Tondre, Deanna 
0443- Hall, Mitchel 
0447 - Bianchi, Jennifer 
2119 -Tidridge, Judy 
25790-1:30 p.m. Public 
Storage® 9420 Spectrum Dr. 
Austin, TX 78717 
2296 - McBride, lisha 
2193 - Gipson, Andrea 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALe” 

Pursuant to Chapter 59, Texas 
Property Code, a public auction 
to satisfy a landlord’s lien will 
be held at the locations listed 
below on August 28th, 2014. 
Property will be sold by the unit 
to the highest bidder for cash. 
$100.00 clean-out deposit per 
buyer will be required. Property 
being sold includes the follow- 
ing contents: 

On or after 10:30 AM 
Allsafe Storage 7116 S. IH 35, 
Austin, TX 78745 
Olga Martinez- childrens toys, 
random boxes, small furniture 
Paul Steiffer- old furniture, 
shelving, painting prints 
John McelHenney- alot of 
boxes, tires, odds and ends 
To follow after preceding 
location: Texas Storage Park 
10013 RR 620 N., Austin, TX 
78726 

Boyd Darling - Cobal boat and 
EZL trailer. 

To follow the preceding 
location 

Great Value Storage, 2407 S. 
Hwy 183, Leander, TX 78641 

Vicky Collins - misc household 
items 

Jamie Nauert - misc household 
items 

Ramiro Esquivel - misc house- 
hold items 

Andrea Brewer - misc house- 
hold items, tools, flat screen TV 
James Jenkins - holiday items 
Chris Maher - misc household 
items, holiday items, coins 
Lisa Gloria -clothing, holiday 
items 

Juan Aguirre - clothing, shop 
tools 

Brandon Looney- childrens 
clothing 

Seller reserves the right to not 
accept any bid and to withdraw 
property from sale. 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE 

Under a security interest 
described within a Lease 
between DWF III Prominent 
Pointe, LP (“Landlord”) and Bill 
Smith Group, LLC (“Tenant”), 
Landlord shall sell collateral in 
one lot for cash to the highest 
bidder, at a public sale to be 
held at 12:00 p.m. on August 14, 
2014, at 8310-1 Capital of Texas 
Highway North, Austin, TX 
78731 . All sale property may 
be inspected on-site one (1) 
hour prior to sale. 

The property includes 
equipment, furniture, and 
furnishings. Landlord reserves 
the right to withdraw any or 
all items from the sale at any 
time prior to the opening bid. 


A list of the items to be sold, 
the terms of sale, and other 
information may be obtained 
from Mary Luther at 51 2/ 381 - 
1615, or e-mail to MLuther® 
endeavor-re.com. 


NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL 
PROPERTY State of Texas 
County of Travis 
Cause: D1G13002228-1 

By virtue of an Writ of Execu- 
tion issued the the clerk of 
the District Court 250 Court of 
TRAVIS County, Texas, June 
17, 2014, in cause numbered 
D1GN13002228-1, styled 
CHIMNEYHILL-AUSTIN 
HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIA- 
TION INC versus MARK W 
STEWARD on a judgment 
rendered against MARK W 
STEWARD; I did on July 30, 
2014, at 1000am, levy upon 
as the property of MARK W 
STEWARD the following 
described real property: 

Lot 23, ChimneyHill First 
Installment, A Subdivision 
in Travis County, Texas, Ac- 
cording To The Map or Plat 
Thereof Recorded in Volume 
66, Page 9, Plat Records of 
Travis County, Texas. 

On September 02, 2014, 
being the first Tuesday of the 
month, between the hours 
of 10:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M., 
beginning at 10:00 A.M., at the 
Travis County Courthouse, 

1000 Guadalupe Street, Austin, 
Texas, I will sell for cash to the 
highest bidder, all the right, 
title and interest of MARK W 
STEWARD in and to the real 
property described above. 

Dated at Austin, Travis County, 
Texas, July 30, 2014. 

Carlos B. Lopez, 

Constable Precinct 5 
Travis County, Texas 
/s/ by SENIOR DEPUTY DER- 
RICK HILL, Deputy 
Notice to Bidders: You are buy- 
ing whatever interest, if any, 
the Debtor has in the property. 
Purchase of the Debtor’s inter- 
est in the property may not 
extinguish any liens or security 
interests held by other persons. 
There are no warranties, ex- 
press or implied, regarding the 
property being sold, including 
but not limited to warranties of 
title, merchantability, or fitness 
for a particular purpose. 

Notice to Judgment Debtor: If 
there is any property, real or 
personal, you want to point 
out for levy in lieu of the above 
described property, you must 
contact this office immediately. 
Bidders shall present an 
unexpired written statement 
issued to the person in the 
manner prescribed by Section 
34.015, Tax Code, showing that 
the Travis County Assessor- 
Collector has determined that 
there are no delinquent ad 
valorem taxes owed by the 
other person. In addition, an 
individual may not bid on or 
purchase property in the name 
of any other individual. 

NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL 
PROPERTY State of Texas 
County of Travis 
Cause: D1GN14000649-1 

By virtue of an Order of Sale is- 
sued the the clerk of the Court 
200 Court of TRAVIS County, 
Texas, July 07, 2014, in cause 
numbered D1GN 14000649-1, 
styled LAKEWAY PATIO 
HOMES SECTION II HOME- 
OWNERS ASSOCIATION 
INC versus XPEDIANT 
EDUCATIONAL SOLUTIONS 
LL ETAL on a judgment 
rendered against XPEDIANT 
EDUCATIONAL SOLUTIONS 
LLETAL; I did on July 22, 2014, 
at 1000 A.M. levy upon as the 
property of XPEDIANT EDU- 
CATIONAL SOLUTIONS LL 
ETAL the following described 
real property: 

Unit 2, Building K, Section 
Two, together with an 
undivided interest in and 
to the common elements 
appurtenant thereto, of 
Lakeway Condominium Patio 
Townhomes, A Condominium 
Project in Travis County, 
Texas, According to the 
Declaration of Condominium 
and the attached plats and 
exhibits of record in volume 
1, page 22, volume 1, page 78, 
volume 1, page 200, volume 3, 
page 561, and volume 5, page 
590, of the Condominium 
records of T ravis County, 
Texas, and volume 7008, 
page 284, of the real property 
records of T ravis County, 
Texas, and in Document 
number 2001015660, of the 
official public records of 
Travis County, Texas (Locally 
known as 218 LIDO#K-2, 
Lakeway, Texas 78734) of the 
map or plat records of Travis 
County, Texas. 

On September 02, 2014, 
being the first Tuesday of the 
month, between the hours 
of 10:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M., 
beginning at 10:00 A.M., at the 


Travis County Courthouse, 

1000 Guadalue Street, Austin, 
Texas, I will sell for cash to the 
highest bidder, all the right, 
title and interest of XPEDIANT 
EDUCATIONAL SOLUTIONS 
LL ETAL in and to the real 
property described above. 

Dated at Austin, Travis County, 
Texas, July 22, 2014. 

Carlos B. Lopez, 

Constable Precinct 5 
Travis County, Texas 
/s/ by SENIOR DEPUTY DER- 
RICK HILL, Deputy 
Notice to Bidders: You are buy- 
ing whatever interest, if any, 
the Debtor has in the property. 
Purchase of the Debtor’s inter- 
est in the property may not 
extinguish any liens or security 
interests held by other persons. 
There are no warranties, ex- 
press or implied, regarding the 
property being sold, including 
but not limited to warranties of 
title, merchantability, or fitness 
for a particular purpose. 

Notice to Judgment Debtor: If 
there is any property, real or 
personal, you want to point 
out for levy in lieu of the above 
described property, you must 
contact this office immediately. 
Bidders shall present an 
unexpired written statement 
issued to the person in the 
manner prescribed by Section 
34.015, Tax Code, showing that 
the Travis County Assessor- 
Collector has determined that 
there are no delinquent ad 
valorem taxes owed by the 
other person. In addition, an 
individual may not bid on or 
purchase property in the name 
of any other individual. 


NOTICE OF SERVICE OF 

PROCESS BY PUBLICATION 
STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA 
UNION COUNTY 
IN THE GENERAL COURT OF 
JUSTICE 

DISTRICT COURT DIVISION 
FOR THE ADOPTION OF IN RE 
DOE (14SP0633) 

TO: The unknown father of 
adoptee, a male child, born on 
June 21 , 2005, in Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania. 

Take notice that a pleading 
seeking relief against you has 
been filed in the above-entitled 
special proceedings, before the 
Clerk of Superior Court. The na- 
ture of the relief being sought 
is for the adoption of minor 
child conceived approximately 
in October 2004 in Austin, 
Texas. The biological mother is 
Marianne Scholastica Dale also 
know as Marianne Scholastica 
Novak. 

You are required to make de- 
fense to such pleading not later 
than 40 days after the first date 
of publication of this notice on 
August 8, 2014. If you fail to do 
so, the party seeking service 
against you will apply to the 
court for the relief sought. Any 
parental rights you may have 
will be terminated upon entry 
of a Decree of Adoption. 

This, the 8 th day of August, 
2014. 

P. Doughton Horton, Esq. 

118 Matthews Indian Trail Road 
Indian Trail, NC 28079 


NOtiCE TO ALL PERSONS 

HAVING CLAIMS AGAINST 
THE ESTATE OF GARY MI- 
CHAEL RAMSEY, DECEASED 
Notice is hereby given that 
original Letters of Administra- 
tion for the Estate of Gary 
Michael Ramsey, Deceased, 
were issued on July 29, 2014, 
Cause No. C-1-PB-1 4-000941, 
pending in Probate Court No. 

1 of Travis County, Texas to 
Donald B. Henderson, Jr. 

All persons having claims 
against this Estate which is 
currently being administered 
are required to present them to 
Donald B. Henderson, Jr., as 
Independent Administrator of 
said Estate, in the care of his 
attorneys at the address given 
below, within the time and in 
the manner prescribed by law: 
Alvin J. Golden 
c/o Ikard Golden Jones, P.C. 

400 West 15th Street, Suite 975 
Austin, Texas 78701 
DATED this 29th day of July, 
2014. 

Respectfully submitted, 

IKARD GOLDEN JONES, P.C. 
400 West 15th Street, Suite 975 
Austin, Texas 78701 
(512) 472-6695 (Tel) 

(512) 472-3669 (Fax) 

By: ALVIN J. GOLDEN 
State Bar No. 08079000 
KATHERINE C.AKINC 
State Bar No. 24065738 
ATTORNEYS FOR THE ESTATE 


NOTICE TO ALL PERSONS 

HAVING CLAIMS AGAINST 
THE ESTATE OF JOY MAN- 
NING SCOTT, DECEASED 
Notice is hereby given that 
original Letters Testamentary 
for the Estate of Joy Manning 
Scott, Deceased, were issued 
on July 23, 2014, in Docket No. 
C-1-PB-14-001112, pending in 
the Probate Court Number One 


of Travis County, Texas to: 
MORIN MONTAGU SCOTT, 
JR., Independent Executor 
All persons having claims 
against the estate are 
notified to present them to the 
undersigned at the address 
shown below within the time 
prescribed by law. 

Claims may be presented ad- 
dressed as follows: 
Representative, Estate of Joy 
Manning Scott 
c/o Morin Montagu Scott, Jr., 
Independent Executor 
Southwest Hotels, Inc. 

1100 West Capitol 
Little Rock, AR 72201 
DATED this the 29th day of 
July, 2014. 

/s/ Morin Montagu Scott, Jr. 
1100 West Capitol 
Little Rock, AR 72201 
INDEPENDENT EXECUTOR 
OF THE ESTATE OF JOY MAN- 
NING SCOTT, DECEASED 


NOTICE TO ALL PERSONS 

HAVING CLAIMS AGAINST 
THE ESTATE OF ROBERT L. 
STONE, DECEASED Notice 
is hereby given that original 
Letters Testamentary for the 
Estate of Robert L. Stone, 
Deceased, were issued on 
July 29, 2014, in Cause No. 
C-1-PB-1 4-001 258, pending 
in the Probate Court No. 1 of 
Travis County, Texas, to: OLA 
GERALDINE STONE. 

The residence of Ola Geraldine 
Stone is located in Austin, 
Texas. The post office address 
is: c/o Charles L. Eppright, 900 
Congress Avenue, Suite 300, 
Austin, Texas 78701. 

All persons having claims 
against this Estate which is cur- 
rently being administered are 
required to present them within 
the time and in the manner 
prescribed by law. 

Dated the 30th day of July, 

2014. 

SNEED, VINE & PERRY, P.C. 

900 Congress Avenue, Suite 300 
Austin, Texas 78701 
Telephone: 512/476-6955 
Facsimile: 512/476-1825 
By: /s/ Charles L. Eppright 
State Bar No. 06637500 
ATTORNEYS FOR THE ESTATE 


NOTICE TO ALL PERSONS 

HAVING CLAIMS AGAINST 
THE ESTATE OF RONALD J. 
SCHAUF, DECEASED Notice is 
hereby given that original Let- 
ters of Independent Administra- 
tion for the Estate of RONALD 
J. SCHAUF, Deceased, were is- 
sued on July 31 , 2014 in Cause 
No. C-1-PB-1 3-002210 pending 
in the Probate Court of Travis 
County, Texas, to: CAROL ANN 
SCHAUF, Independent Admin- 
istrator. The residence of the 
Independent Administrator is 
Naples, Florida. An Appoint- 
ment of Resident Agent form is 
on file in the cause. The post 
office address is: 

Estate of Ronald J. Schauf 
Law Office of Diane Hebner 
507 West 7th Street 
Austin, TX 78701-2831 
All persons having claims 
against this Estate which is cur- 
rently being administered are 
required to present them within 
the time and in the manner 
prescribed by law. 

DATED July 31, 2014. 

LAW OFFICE OF DIANE 
HEBNER 

507 West 7th Street 
Austin, TX 78701-2831 
(512) 477-4158 Telephone 
(512) 477-2126 Fax 
By: /s/ Diane Hebner 
Attorney for Independent 
Administrator 
State Bar No.: 09367300 


NOTICE TO ALL PERSONS 

HAVING CLAIMS AGAINST 
THE ESTATE OF WIL- 
LIAM BOYD LEE Notice is 
hereby given that in Cause 
No. C-1-PB-14-001 222, styled 
Estate of WILLIAM BOYD LEE, 
Deceased, pending in the 
Probate Court No. 1 of Travis 
County, Texas, original Letters 
Testamentary were issued 
on the 24th day of July, 2014, 
toJOSELYN ANN LEE (the 
“personal representative”). All 
persons having claims against 
said estate are hereby required 
to present same within the time 
prescribed by law, and before 
such estate is closed. The 
personal representative directs 
that claims be presented to 
said personal representative 
at the address shown below 
care of the attorney for said 
representative. 

JOSELYN ANN LEE 

c/o JOHN CALHOUN MILLER 

Attorney at Law 

1509 OldW. 38th St. #3 

Austin, Texas 78731 

Email: jcalmiller®aol.com 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

Notice is hereby given that 
original Letters Testamentary 
for the Estate of Gertrud K. 

Spencer, aka Gertrud Koos 
Spencer, aka Gertrud Erna 
Koos, aka Gertrud Erna Spen- 

austinchronicle.com 


cer. Deceased, were issued 
on July 31, 2014, in Cause No. 
C-1-PB-14-001237, pending in 
the Probate Court No. 1, Travis 
County, Texas, to: ALexander 
K. Spencer. 

All persons having claims 
against this Estate which is cur- 
rently being administered are 
required to present them to the 
undersigned within the time 
and in the manner prescribed 
by law. 

c/o: Brad Wiewel 
Attorney at Law 
1601 Rio Grande st., Ste. 550 
Austin, TX 78701 

DATED the 31st day of July, 
2014 

Ann Lumley 

Attorney for Alexander K. 
Spencer. 


NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

Notice is hereby given that 
original Letters Testamentary 
for the Estate of RABEN J. 
SHELTON, Deceased, were is- 
sued on July 31 , 2014, in Cause 
No. C-1-PB-1 1-001 234, pending 
in the Probate Court No. ONE, 
TRAVIS County, Texas, to: 
MARY L. LYMAN. 

All persons having claims 
against this Estate which is cur- 
rently being administered are 
required to present them to the 
undersigned within the time 
and in the manner prescribed 
by law. 

c/o: Jamie Etzkorn 
Attorney at Law 
925 Loop 332 
Liberty Hill, TX 78642 
DATED the 4th day of Au- 


gust, 2014. 

Jamie Etzkorn 

Attorney for Kenneth Lee Weed 
State Bar No.: 24047600 
925 Loop 332 
Liberty Hill, TX 78642 
Telephone: (512) 800-6353 
Facsimile: (512) 233-5207 


NOTICE TO CREbiTbRS 

Notice is hereby given that 
Letters of Dependent Adminis- 
tration for the Estate of Cynthia 
Denise Lowery a/k/a Cynthia 
Denise Lowery Jones were 
issued on July 25, 2014, under 
Cause No. C-1-PB-14-000391, 
in the Probate Court, Number 
One, Travis County, Texas, to 
James N. Jones, Independent 
Administrator. 

All persons having claims 
against this Estate, which is 
currently being administered, 
must present them within 
the time and in the manner 
prescribed by law. Any such 
claims may be deposited with 
the clerk of said court or ad- 
dressed and sent to James N. 
Jones, Dependent Administra- 
tor, c/o Law Office of Tony A. 
Pitts, P.O. Box 5369, Round 
Rock, TX 78683. 




by Luke Ellis 

The material in this column is for informational pur- 
poses only. It does not constitute, nor is it a substitute 
for, legal advice. For advice on your specific facts and 
circumstances, consult a licensed attorney. 

MY FUTURE ROOMMATE 
BACKED OUT - NOW WHAT? 

A few months ago a friend and I signed a 
lease to move into a two-bedroom starting this 
August. But then she decided to move in with 
her boyfriend before our lease started, and now 
she won’t pay her share of the rent. Even though 
we both signed the lease, the landlord says that 
she expects me to pay the entire rent. Can I 
really deforced to pay all of the rent? 

Most likely yes. The answer will depend on 
the terms of your lease. A landlord can typi- 
cally hold a tenant responsible for the entire 
amount of the rent because, as a general rule, 
most lease agreements require each tenant to 
agree to be responsible for the entire rental 
payment. This is one reason why landlords 
usually encourage as many people as possible 
to sign the lease: It gives them more options 
to recover unpaid rent because they can go to 
each tenant to seek the entire rental payment. 

Some leases contain clauses that apportion 
the rental payments between specific tenants; 
however, these clauses are rare. You should 
read your lease to see if it contains a clause 
stating that you are only responsible for partial 
payment of the rental amount. 

Assuming you are on the hook for the entire 
payment, there are other options that could 
help you avoid footing the bill for your flaky 
(ex-)roommate. One practical option is to try 
to find another roommate (subject to the land- 
lord’s consent). You could also try to get out of 
the lease altogether if you can find new tenants 
that are interested to take over the lease (also 
subject to landlord’s consent). You will likely 
have to make the landlord whole for any inter- 
im lost rent even if either of these two options 
are approved. Finally, if you do pay all the rent, 
you could consider asserting a separate claim 
against the roommate who moved out to recov- 
er her share of the rent. The main point of this 
question is clear — choose your roommates 
with caution when signing a lease! 

Please submit column suggestions, questions, and 
comments to thecommonlaw@austinchronicle.com. Submission 
of potential topics does not create an attorney-client 
relationship, and any information submitted is subject 
to inclusion in future columns. 


AUGUST8,2014 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE 89 


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY 

by Rob Brezsny for August 8-14 

LEO(July23-Aug.22): Every 12 years, the planet Jupiter spends about a year cruising through the sign 
of Leo. It’s there v/ith you now/, and v/ill be v/ith you through early August 2015. What can you expect? 
EXPANSION! That’s great, right? Yes and no. You might love to have some parts of your life expand; others, 
not so much. So I suggest you v/rite dov/n your intentions. Say something like this: “I v/ant Jupiter to help me 
expand my faith in myself, my power to do what I love, and my ability to draw on the resources and allies I 
need. Meanwhile, I will prune my desires for things I don’t really need and cut back on my involvement with 
things that don’t inspire me. I don’t want those to expand.” 

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): TV comedian Stephen Colbert confesses that his safe word is “pumpkin 
patch.” Does that mean he participates in actual BDSM rituals? Is it the code word he utters when he 
doesn’t want the intensity to rise any further, when he doesn’t want his next boundary crossed? I don’t know. 
Perhaps he’s simply joking or speaking metaphorically. Whether or not you engage in literal BDSM, Virgo, 
there’s an aspect of your life right now that has metaphorical resemblances to it. And I suggest that you do 
the equivalent of using your safe word very soon. Nothing more can be gained from remaining embroiled in 
your predicament. Even if the ordeal has been interesting or educational up until now, it won’t be for much 
longer. Escape your bondage. 

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): If you’re planning to hurl a thunderbolt, make sure you are all warmed up and 
at full strength before you actually unleash it. It would be sad if you flung a half-assed thunderbolt that 
looked like a few fireflies and sounded like a cooing dove. And please don’t interpret my wise-guy tone here 
as a sign that I’m just kidding around. No, Libra. This is serious stuff. Life is offering you opportunities to 
make a major impression, and I want you to be as big and forceful and wild as you need to be. Don’t tamp 
down your energy out of fear of hurting people’s feelings. Access your inner sky god or sky goddess, and 
have too much fun expressing your raw power. 

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In your dreams you may travel to Stockholm, Sweden, to accept the Nobel 
Prize or to Hollywood to pick up your Oscar. There’s a decent chance that in your sleepytime adventures 
you will finally score with the hot babe who rejected you back in high school, or return to the scene of your 
biggest mistake and do things right this time. I wouldn’t be surprised if in one dream you find yourself riding 
in a gold chariot during a parade held in your honor. I’m afraid, however, that you will have to settle for 
less hoopla and glamour in your waking life. You will merely be doing a fantastic job at tasks you usually 
perform competently. You will be well appreciated, well treated, and well rewarded. That’s not so bad, right? 

SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-Dec. 21): Lake Superior State University issues a “Unicorn Questing License” 
to those people who are interested in hunting for unicorns. Are you one of them? I wouldn’t be surprised 
if you felt an urge like that in the coming weeks. Unusual yearnings will be welling up in you. Exotic fanta- 
sies may replace your habitual daydreams. Certain possibilities you have considered to be unthinkable or 
unattainable may begin to seem feasible. Questions you have been too timid to ask could become crucial 
for you to entertain. (You can get your Unicorn Questing License here: www.tinyurl.com/unicornlicense.) 

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Your ethical code may soon be tested. What will you do if you see a 
chance to get away with a minor sin or petty crime that no one will ever find out about? What if you are 
tempted to lie or cheat or deceive in ways that advance your good intentions and only hurt other people 
a little bit or not at all? I’m not here to tell you what to do, but rather to suggest that you be honest with 
yourself about what’s really at stake. Even if you escape punishment for a lapse, you might nevertheless 
inflict a wound on your integrity that would taint your relationship with your own creativity. Contemplate the 
pleasures of purity and righteousness, and use them to enhance your power. 

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “The thorn arms the roses,” says an old Latin motto. The astrological 
omens suggest you’ll be wise to muse on that advice in the coming weeks. How should you interpret it? I’ll 
leave you to draw your own conclusions, of course, but here are a few hints. It may be that beauty needs 
protection, or at least buffering. It’s possible that you can’t simply depend on your sincerity and good in- 
tentions, but also need to infuse some ferocity into your efforts. In order for soft, fragile, lovely things to do 
what they do best, they may require the assistance of tough, strong, hearty allies. 

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): if you go to an American doctor to be treated for an ailment, odds are that 
he or she will interrupt you no more than 14 seconds into your description of what’s wrong. But you must not 
tolerate this kind of disrespect in the coming days, Pisces - not from doctors, not from anyone. You simply 
must request or, if necessary, demand the receptivity you deserve. If and when it’s given, I urge you to speak 
your truth in its entirety. Express what has been hidden and suppressed. And this is very important: Take 
responsibility for your own role in any problems you discuss. 

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Don’t just be smart and articulate, Aries. Dare to be wildly wise and prone 
to unruly observations. Don’t merely be kind and well behaved. Explore the mysteries of healing through 
benevolent mischief. Don’t buy into the all-too-serious trances. Break up the monotony with your unpredict- 
able play and funny curiosity. Don’t simply go along with the stories everyone seems to believe in as if they 
were the Truth and the Way. Question every assumption; rebel against every foregone conclusion; propose 
amusing plot twists that send the narratives off on interesting tangents. 

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Breve orazione penetra is an old Italian idiom. Its literal translation is “short 
prayers pierce” or “concise prayers penetrate.” You can extrapolate from that to come up with the meaning 
that “God listens best to brief prayers.” In the coming week, I invite you to apply this idea whenever you 
ask for anything, whether you are seeking the favors of the Divine Wow or the help of human beings. Know 
exactly what you want, and express it with no-nonsense succinctness. 

GEMINI (May 21-Jline20): Every February, you go through a phase when it’s easier to see the big picture 
of your life. If you take advantage of this invitation, your experience is like being on a mountaintop and gaz- 
ing into the vastness. Every August, on the other hand, you are more likely to see the details you have been 
missing. Transformations that have been too small and subtle to notice may become visible to you. If you 
capitalize on this opportunity, the experience is like peering through a microscope. Here’s a third variation, 
Gemini: Around the full moons of both February and August, you may be able to alternately peer into the 
microscope and simulate the view from a mountaintop. I think that’s about to happen. 

CANCER (June 21-July 22): You wouldn’t sip dirty water from a golden chalice. Am I right? Nor would you 
swig delicious poison from a fine crystal wine glass or 10-year-old vinegar from a queen’s goblet. I’m sure 
you will agree that you’d much rather drink a magical elixir from a paper cup, or a rejuvenating tonic from a 
chipped coffee mug, or tasty medicine out of a kids’ plastic soup bowl you bought at the thrift store. Don’t 
you dare lie to yourself about what’s best for you. 


Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s 
EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. 

The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 877/873-4888 or 900/950-7700. 

90 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE AUGUST 8, 2014 austinchronicle.com 


LEGAL 

(ont. 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

Notice is hereby given that 
original Letters Testamentary 
for the Estate of Ada Moncrief 
Mills, Deceased, were issued 
on July 1, 2014, in Cause No. 
C-1-PB-14-000882, pending in 
County Court 1, Travis County, 
Texas, to Roy Lee Mills, JR. 
Claims may be presented in 
care of the attorney for the 
estate, addressed as follows: 
Roy Lee Mills, JR, Independent 
Executor 

Estate of Ada Moncrief Mills 
c/o The Law Office of William 
H. Russell 
11782 Jollyville Rd. 

Austin, Texas 78759 
All persons having claims 
against this Estate which is cur- 
rently being administered are 
required to present them to the 
undersigned within the time 
and in the manner prescribed 
by law. 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

Notice is hereby given that 
original Letters Testamentary 
for the Estate of DONNA F. 
GRIFFIN, Deceased, were 
issued on July 1, 2014, in Cause 
No. C-1-PB-1 4-000625, pending 
in the Probate Court No. One, 
Travis County, Texas, to: 

Marvel Hagood, also known as 
Marvel L. Hagood. 

All persons having claims 
against this Estate which is cur- 
rently being administered are 
required to present them to the 
undersigned within the time 
and in the manner prescribed 
by law. 

c/o: Susan Camp-Lee 
309 E. Main St. 

Round Rock, Texas 78664 
DATED the 29th day of July, 
2014. 

/s/ Susan Camp-Lee 
Attorney for Marvel L. Hagood 
State Bar No.: 00787192 
309 E. Main St. 

Round Rock, Texas 78664 
Telephone: (512) 255-8877 
Facsimile: (512) 255-8986 
E-mail: Susan@scrrlaw.com 


NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

NOTICE is hereby given that 
original Letters Testamentary 
for the Estate of Genevieve 
Joos Hirsch, Deceased, were is- 
sued on July 29, 2014, in Cause 
No. C-1-PB-14-001162, pending 
in Probate Court No. 1 of Travis 
County, Texas, to: Glenn David 
Hirsch. 

The notice to the Independent 
Executor may be delivered at 
the following address: 
c/o Barnes Lipscomb Stewart 
& Ott PLLC 
Attorneys at Law 
2901 Bee Caves Road, Box D 
Austin, Texas 78746 
All persons having claims 
against this Estate which is cur- 
rently being administered are 
required to present them within 
the time and in the manner 
prescribed by law. 

Dated the 29th day of July, 

2014. 

/s/ Ellen P. Stewart 
Attorney for Independent 
Executor 


NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

Notice is hereby given that 
original Letters Testamentary 
for the Estate of JAMES TAY- 
LOR BALL, Deceased, were 
issued on October 29, 2013, in 
Cause No. C-1-PB-1 3-001 645, 
pending in the Probate Court 
No. One, Travis County, Texas, 
to: Donna Jean Ball Nelson. 

All persons having claims 
against this Estate which is cur- 
rently being administered are 
required to present them to the 
undersigned within the time 
and in the manner prescribed 
by law. 

c/o: Susan Camp-Lee 
309 E. Main St. 

Round Rock, Texas 78664 
DATED the 29th day of July, 
2014. 

/s/ Susan Camp-Lee 
Attorney for Donna Jean Ball 
Nelson 

State Bar No.: 00787192 
309 E. Main St. 

Round Rock, Texas 78664 
Telephone: (512) 255-8877 
Facsimile: (512) 255-8986 
E-mail: Susan@scrrlaw.com 


NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

Notice is hereby given that 
original Letters Testamentary 
for the Estate of JD Taylor, 
Deceased, were issued on 
July 1, 2014, in Cause No. 
C-1-PB-14-001044, pending in 
County Court 1, Travis County, 
Texas, to Arlene Taylor. 

Claims may be presented in 
care of the attorney for the 


estate, addressed as follows: 
Arlene Taylor, Independent 
Executor 

Estate of JD Taylor 

c/o The Law Office of William 

H. Russell 

11782 Jollyville Rd. 

Austin, Texas 78759 
All persons having claims 
against this Estate which is cur- 
rently being administered are 
required to present them to the 
undersigned within the time 
and in the manner prescribed 
by law. 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

Notice is hereby given that 
original Letters Testamentary 
for the Estate of Jerry Lloyd 
Snowden, Deceased, were is- 
sued on July 29, 2014, in Cause 
No. C-1-PB-14-001277, pending 
in the Probate Court Number 
One, Travis County, Texas, to 
Stefanie Ursula Snowden, as 
Independent Executor. 

Claims may be presented in 
care of the attorney for the 
Estate addressed as follows: 
Representative, Estate of Jerry 
Lloyd Snowden, Deceased 
c/o Walter C. Guebert 
Walter C. Guebert, P.C. 

5900 Balcones Drive, Suite 190 
Austin, Texas 78731 
All persons having claims 
against this Estate which is cur- 
rently being administered are 
required to present them within 
the time and in the manner 
prescribed by law. 

DATED this 30th day of July, 
2014. 

WALTER C. GUEBERT, P.C. 

By: /s/ Walter C. Guebert 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS ' 

Notice is hereby given that 
original Letters Testamen- 
tary for the Estate of Jewel H. 
Baker, Deceased, were issued 
on July 30, 2014, in Docket No. 
C-1-PB-14-001101, pending 
in the Probate Court No. 1 of 
Travis County, Texas, to: Burl 
B. Baker. 

The address of the Independent 
Executor is in Austin, Travis 
County, Texas, the mailing 
address is: c/o Scofield & 
Scofield, P.C., 1411 West Av- 
enue, Suite 200, Austin, Texas 
78701-1537. 

All persons having claims 
against this Estate which is cur- 
rently being administered are 
required to present them within 
the time and in the manner 
prescribed by law. 

DATED the 30th day of July, 
2014. 

Scofield & Scofield, P.C. 
Attorneys for the Estate 
By: /s/ Frank E. Scofield 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

Notice is hereby given that orig- 
inal Letters Testamentary for 
the Estate of JOHN T. THUR- 
MAN, Deceased, were issued to 
BRYAN TUCKER THURMAN, 
as Independent Administrator 
With Will Annexed of said Es- 
tate, on July 29, 2014, in Cause 
No. C-1-PB-14-000620, pending 
in Probate Court No. 1, Travis 
County, Texas. 

All persons having claims 
against this Estate which is 
currently being administered 
are required to present them to 
BRYAN TUCKER THURMAN, 
Independent Executor of said 
Estate, in care of his attorney 
Carolyn Collins Ostrom within 
the time and in the manner 
prescribed by law. 

Carolyn Collins Ostrom 

Collins Ostrom PLLC 

816 West 10th Street 

Austin, TX 78701 

DATED the 8th day of August, 

2014. 


NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

Notice is hereby given that 
original Letters Testamentary 
for the Estate of Tommye Dena 
Mortimore, aka Tommye Dena 
Read, aka Tommye Dena 
Leigh, aka Dena Mortimore, 
Deceased, were issued on 
July 29, 2014, in Cause No. 
C-1-PB-14-001218 pending in 
the Probate Court No. 1 , Travis 
County, Texas, to: David L. 
Mortimore. 

All persons having claims 
against this Estate which is cur- 
rently being administered are 
required to present them to the 
undersigned within the time 
and in the manner prescribed 
by law. 

c/o: Brad Wiewel 

Attorney at Law 

1601 Rio Grande St., Ste. 550 

Austin, TX 78701 

DATED the 29th day of July, 

2014. 

/s/ Ann Lumley 

Attorney for David L. Mortimore 

NOTICE TO PRESENT 
CLAIMS Notice is hereby given 
that original Letters Testamen- 
tary for the Estate of THOMAS 
IVAN STRANGE, Deceased, 
were issued on July 31, 2014, 
in Cause No. C-1-PB-14-001119, 
in the Probate Court Number 
One of Travis County, Texas, to 


JEANNIE BARCUS STRANGE, 
as Independent Executor. All 
persons having claims against 
this estate are required to pres- 
ent them to the Executor c/o 
Rodney Sheppard, Attorney at 
Law, 509 Powell Street, Austin, 
TX 78703 within the time and in 
the manner prescribed by law. 

OFFICIAL PUBLIC NOTICE 
TRAVIS COUNTY, TEXAS 

Notice is hereby given that 
sealed bids for the FISCAL 
YEAR 2014 HMAC OVERLAY 
PROGRAM (IFB No. B1407- 

006-JE), a project consisting 
primarily of Hot Mix Asphalt 
Concrete (HMAC) Overlay of 
Roadways in Precincts 1, 2, 

3, 4 and LCRA/Travis County 
Parks, within Travis County, 
will be received electronically 
through www.bidsync.com. 
Bids will be accepted until 2:00 
P. M.CST, August 20, 2014, 
then publicly opened and read 
aloud. Travis County will also 
accept paper bids received by 
Cyd Grimes, Travis County Pur- 
chasing Agent, marked “Sealed 
Bid “FISCAL YEAR 2014 HMAC 
OVERLAY PROGRAM (IFB No. 
B1407-006-JE)” at the Travis 
County Purchasing Office, 700 
Lavaca Street, Ste. 800, Austin, 
TX 78701. Note: The Time- 
Date Stamp Clock located at 
the front counter of the Travis 
County Purchasing Office will 
serve as the OFFICIAL CLOCK 
for the purpose of verifying 
the date and time of receipt of 
paper bids. 

You may print the Plans and 
Specifications through www. 
bidsync.com. In the event 
of a large file size, please be 
patient when downloading or 
viewing. Hard copies (printed) 
of Plans and Specifications 
may also be obtained from 
the Travis County Purchas- 
ing Office for a refundable 
deposit of $25.00 in the form of 
a cashier’s check, money order, 
or company check payable to 
“Travis County.” The deposit 
will be refunded if the Plans 
and Specifications are returned 
in good condition within 21 
calendar days of the bid open- 
ing. In addition. Plans and 
Specifications will be made 
available for viewing free of 
charge at various Austin-area 
Plan Rooms. 

A bid security in the amount 
of five percent (5%) of the total 
bid amount will be required. IF 
A COPY OF THE BID SECU- 
RITY IS SUBMITTED ELEC- 
TRONICALLY THROUGH 
WWW.BIDSYNC.COM, AN 
ORIGINAL AND ONE COPY 
WILL BE DUE (BY CLOSE OF 
BUSINESS) ONE BUSINESS 
DAY AFTER THE BID OPEN- 
ING DATE. Payments will be 
made for completed work in 
progressive payments with the 
County retaining five percent 
(5%) of each payment until final 
acceptance of the project. Pay- 
ments will be made by check. 

A Payment Bond is required 
in the amount of one hundred 
percent (100%) of the contract 
amount, if the contract amount 
exceeds $25,000. A Perfor- 
mance Bond is required in the 
amount of one hundred percent 
(100%) of the contract amount, 
if the contract amount exceeds 
$100,000. Bidders should use 
lump sum pricing. 

Project performance period 
is through the end of October 
2014 with the option to extend 
at the discretion of the Travis 
County Commissioners Court. 

If the contractor fails to com- 
plete the Project in the working 
days specified, liquidated dam- 
ages will be assessed in ac- 
cordance with the table shown 
under Item 8 -Prosecution and 
Progress, found in the standard 
bid documents-lnstructions to 
Bidders. 

Historically Underutilized Busi- 
nesses including Contractors, 
Subcontractors, and Suppliers 
are encouraged to participate 
in this project consistent 
with the goals of the Travis 
County Commissioners Court. 
Contractors will be required 
to comply with all applicable 
Equal Employment Opportu- 
nity laws and regulations, all 
Federal, State, and local regula- 
tions for construction safety 
and health standards. 

The successful bidder must 
commence work upon issu- 
ance by County of a written 
Notice to Proceed. The County 
reserves the right to reject any 
and all bids and to waive any 
informality in the bids received. 
Bids may not be withdrawn 
for ninety (90) calendar days 
after the date on which they 
are opened. 

THERE ARE UNIT PRICES 
ASSOCIATED WITH THIS BID. 


BIDDERS MUST DOWNLOAD 
AND COMPLETE THE AS- 
SOCIATED BID PROPOSAL 
WORKSHEET (LOCATED IN 
THE “DOCUMENTS” SECTION 
OF THIS BID) THEN UPLOAD 
AND SUBMIT IT WITH THEIR 
BID. FAILURETO SUBMIT THE 
BID PROPOSAL WORKSHEET 
MAY RESULT IN REJECTION 
OF YOUR BID. 

Construction Cost Estimate is 
$3,650,000.00 for Precincts 1-4 
and $78,877.00 for LCRA/Travis 
County Parks. 

OFFICIAL PUBLIC NOTICE 
TO BIDDERS TRAVIS 
COUNTY, TEXAS 

Notice is hereby given that 
sealed bids will be accepted by 
Travis County for the following 
items: 

1. Road Recycling, 1407-002-RF 
Opens: August 18, 2014 @ 

9:00 a.m. 

2. 700 Lavaca Building Janito- 
rial Services, 1407-005-LD 
Opens: August 18, 2014 @ 

2:00 p.m. 

3. 700 Lavaca Building Elevator 
Maintenance, 1407-007-LD 
Opens: August 18, 2014 @ 

3:00 p.m. 

4. Commissioned Security 
Guard Services, 1404-009-RF 
Opens: August 25, 2014 @ 

9:00 a.m. 

Bids should be submitted to: 
Cyd Grimes, Travis County 
Purchasing Agent, 700 Lavaca 
Street, Suite 800, P.O. Box 1748, 
Austin, Texas 78767. Specifica- 
tions can be obtained from or 
viewed at the Travis County 
Purchasing Office at no charge 
or by downloading a copy from 
our website: www.co.travis. 
tx. us/purchasing/solicitation, 
asp. Bidders should use unit 
pricing or lump sum pricing, if 
appropriate. Payments may be 
made by check. The successful 
bidder shall be required to 
furnish a Performance Bond 
in the amount of One Hundred 
percent (100%) of the contract 
amount awarded, if applicable. 

OFFICIAL PUBLIC NOTICE 
TO PROPOSERS TRAVIS 
COUNTY, TEXAS 

Notice is hereby given that 
sealed proposals will be ac- 
cepted by Travis County for the 
following items: 

1. Medical Evaluation and 
Treatment Services RFS # 
1405-006-DW 

Opens: August 14, 2014 @ 

3:00 p.m. 

2. Remote Digital Camera 
System, RFP# 1 406-021 -JH 
Opens: August 22, 2014 @ 

2:00 p.m. 

Proposals should be submitted 
to: Cyd Grimes, Travis County 
Purchasing Agent, 700 Lavaca 
Street, Suite 800, P.O. Box 
1748, Austin, Texas 78767. 
Proposal Documents can be 
obtained from or viewed at 
the Travis County Purchasing 
Office at no charge or by 
downloading a copy from our 
website: www.co.travis.tx.us/ 
purchasing/solicitation. asp. 
Proposers should use unit 
pricing or lump sum pricing, if 
appropriate. Payments may be 
made by check. The successful 
proponent shall be required to 
furnish a Performance Bond 
in the amount of One Hundred 
percent (100%) of the contract 
amount awarded, if applicable. 


PUBLIC NOTICE 

In accordance with the 
Nationwide Programmatic 
Agreement regarding the Sec- 
tion 1 06 of the National Historic 
Preservation Act (NHPA), and 
the Migratory Bird Act, AT&T 
(New Cingular Wireless PCS, 
LLC, a Delaware Corporation) 
has proposed to construct a 
new cellular tower compound 
at 3231 Travis County Circle, 
Travis County, Texas. The pro- 
posed Regents West Campus 
(TX 0720) Site will be a 145-foot 
monopole tower with concrete 
foundation equipment shelter. 
The Form 854 File Number 
is available upon request. 
Proposed plans include equip- 
ping the tower with medium 
intensity white strobe lighting 
during daylight hours and 
medium intensity red flashing 
lighting at night. To submit 
comments regarding potential 
effects of the proposed 
facility on historic properties, 
endangered species, or migra- 
tory birds please contact Alex 
Asbury at 6391 De Zavala Road, 
Suite 1 1 3, San Antonio, Texas 
78249, telephone (210) 694-4545, 
or emailacasbury@medinacci. 
com. Interested persons may 
also review the application by 
going to www.fcc.gov/asr/appli- 
cations and entering the Form 
854 File Number. Additionally, 
interested persons may raise 


environmental concerns about 
the proposed project by filing 
a Request for Environmental 
Review with the Federal Com- 
munications Commission. The 
FCC encourages interested 
parties to file Requests for 
Environmental Review online. 
Instructions for making such 
filings can be found at www. 
fcc.gov/asr/environmentalre- 
quest.The mailing address for 
interested parties that would 
prefer to file a Request for 
Environmental Review by paper 
copy is 445 12th Street SW, 
Washington, DC 20554 (Attn: 
Ramon Williams). 


PUBLIC NOTICE 

In accordance with the Nation- 
wide Programmatic Agreement 
regarding the Section 106 of 
the National Historic Preserva- 
tion Act (NHPA), and the 
Migratory Bird Act, AT&T (New 
Cingular Wireless PCS, LLC, 
a Delaware Corporation) has 
proposed to co-locate cellular 
antennas onto an existing 130- 
foot monopole cellular tower 
at 501 7 1/2 US HWY 290 West, 
Austin, Travis County, Texas. 
The Buy Buy Baby (TX0751) 
co-location will also include 
a new concrete foundation 
equipment shelter. The Form 
854 File Number is available 
upon request. Proposed 
plans include equipping the 
tower with medium intensity 
white strobe lighting during 
daylight hours and medium 
intensity red flashing lighting 
at night. To submit comments 
regarding potential effects 
of the proposed facility on 
historic properties, endangered 
species, or migratory birds 
please contact Alex Asbury 
at 6391 De Zavala Road, Suite 
1 1 3, San Antonio, Texas 78249, 
telephone (210) 694-4545, or 
emailacasbury@medinacci. 
com. Interested persons may 
also review the application by 
going to www.fcc.gov/asr/appli- 
cations and entering the Form 
854 File Number. Additionally, 
interested persons may raise 
environmental concerns about 
the proposed project by filing 
a Request for Environmental 
Review with the Federal Com- 
munications Commission. The 
FCC encourages interested 
parties to file Requests for 
Environmental Review online. 
Instructions for making such 
filings can be found at www. 
fcc.gov/asr/environmentalre- 
quest. The mailing address for 
interested parties that would 
prefer to file a Request for 
Environmental Review by paper 
copy is 445 12th Street SW, 
Washington, DC 20554 (Attn: 
Ramon Williams). 


SUPERIOR COURT FOR THE 

STATE OF WASHINGTON IN 
THE COUNTY OF KING 
IN THE MATTER OF THE 
ADOPTION OF UNBORN IN- 
FANT WENDT, a person under 
the age of eighteen. 

NO. 14-5-00662-5 SEA 
SUMMONS AND NOTICE 
OF PETITION/HEARING RE 
RELINQUISHMENT OF CHILD/ 
TERMINATION OF PARENT- 
CHILD RELATIONSHIP 
TO: ANDREW D. McQUILKIN, 
JOHN DOE (UNKNOWN) AND 
TO ANY OTHER INTERESTED 
PARTY 

You are hereby summoned to 
appear within thirty days after 
the date of first publication of 
this summons, to-wit, within 
thirty days after the 25th day 
of July, 2014 and defend the 
above-entitled action in the 
above-entitled court, and 
answer the petition of the 
Petitioner, BETHANY CHRIS- 
TIAN SERVICES, and serve 
a copy of your answer upon 
the undersigned attorneys for 
Petitioner, BETHANY CHRIS- 
TIAN SERVICES, at the office 
below stated; if you fail to do 
so, judgment may be rendered 
against you according to the 
request of the petition which 
has been filed with the Clerk of 
said Court. 

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED 
that a petition has been filed in 
this court praying that the par- 
ent-child relationship between 
parents of the above-named 
child and the above-named 
child be terminated. The object 
of the action is to seek an order 
relinquishing the child to the 
Petitioner for adoption and 
to terminate the parent-child 
relationship. The child was 
conceived in September 2013 in 
Olympia, Washington and is ex- 
pected to be born on August 5, 
2014. The child’s birth mother 
is Dusty Wendt. 

The court hearing on this mat- 
ter shall be on the 27th day of 
August, 2014 at 9:00 a.m. in the 


King County Superior Court,; 
address: King County Court- 
house, Ex Parte Department, 
Court Room W-325, 516 Third 
Avenue, Seattle, Washington 
98104. 

YOUR FAILURE TO APPEAR 
AT THIS HEARING MAY RE- 
SULT IN A DEFAULT ORDER 
PERMANENTLYTERMINATING 
ALL OF YOUR RIGHTS TO THE 
ABOVE-NAMED CHILD. 
NOTICE: State and federal law 
provide protections to defen- 
dants who are on active duty 
in the military service, and to 
their dependents. Dependents 
of a service member are the 
service member’s spouse, the 
service member’s minor child, 
or an individual for whom the 
service member provided more 
than one-half of the individual’s 
support for one hundred eighty 
days immediately preceding 
an application for relief. One 
protection provided is the 
protection against the entry of 
a default judgment in certain 
circumstances. This notice only 
pertains to a defendant who is 
a dependent of a member of 
the national guard or military 
reserve component under a call 
to active service for a period of 
more than thirty consecutive 
days. Other defendants in 
military service also have 
protections against default 
judgments not covered by this 
notice. If you are the dependent 
of a member of the national 
guard or a military reserve 
component under a call to ac- 
tive service for a period of more 
than thirty consecutive days, 
you should notify the plaintiff 
or the plaintiff’s attorney in 
writing of your status as such 
within twenty days of the re- 
ceipt of this notice. If you fail to 
do so, then a court or an admin- 
istrative tribunal may presume 
that you are not a dependent of 
an active duty member of the 
national guard or reserves, and 
proceed with the entry of an 
order of default and/or a default 
judgment without further proof 
of your status. Your response 
to the plaintiff or plaintiff’s at- 
torney’s about your status does 
not constitute an appearance 
for jurisdictional purposes in 
any pending litigation nor a 
waiver of your rights. 

You are further notified that 
any non-consenting parent or 
alleged father has a right to be 
represented by an attorney, and 
an attorney will be appointed 
for an indigent parent who 
requests an attorney. 

You are further notified taht 
your failure to file a claim of 
paternity under Chapter 26.26 
RCW within thirty days of the 
first publication of this notice 
or to respond to the petition 
within thirty days of the first 
publication of this notice is 
grounds to terminate your 
parent-child relationship with 
respect to the child. 

You are further notified that 
your failure to respond to the 
termination action within 
twenty days of service, if served 
within the state of Washington 
, or thirty days if served outside 
of this state, will result in the 
termination of the parent-child 
with respect to the child. 

You are further notified that 
if you are the alleged father 
of an Indian child, and your 
acknowledge paternity of the 
child, or if your paternity of the 
child is established prior to the 
termination of the parent-child 
relationship, your parental 
rights may not be terminated 
unless you: (i) give valid con- 
sent to termination, or (ii) your 
parent-child relationship is 
terminated involuntarily pursu- 
ant to 26.33 or 13.34 RCW. 

One method of filing your 
response and serving a copy on 
the Petitioner is to send them 
your written response by certi- 
fied mail with return receipt 
requested. 

WITNESS the Honorable 
CARLOS Y. VELATEGUI, Judge/ 
Court Commissioner of said 
Superior Court and the seal of 
said Court hereunto affixed this 
16th day of July, 2014. 
BARBARA MINER 
King County Superior Court 
Clerk 

By: A. GALLARDO Deputy 
Clerk 

FILE RESPONSE WITH : Clerk 
of Court King County Superior 
Court King County Courthouse 
516 Third Avenue 
Seattle, WA 98104 
SERVE A COPY OF YOUR 
RESPONSE ON : 

Petitioner’s Attorney: Albert 
G. Lirhus 

Lirhus & Keckemet LLP 
1200 5th Avenue, Suite 1550 
Seattle, WA 98101 


(D £ 

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*^here when you need us” 



CLASSES/ 

INSTRUCTION 

AUSTIN HARMONICA 
LESSONS 

Austin Harmonica Teacher 
Michael Rubin 

michaelrubinharmonica.com 

619-0761 


ITALIAN LANGUAGE 
CLASSES 

- Every Tuesday: 6pm Italian for 
Beginners 

- 7pm Italian for Intermediate 

- 8pm Italian for Advanced 
Private Lessons Available on 
Saturday & Sunday: 
www.ATasteOfItalyInAustin. 
com 


GENERAL 

ADOPTION PREGNANT? 
THINKING OF ADOPTION? 

Talk with caring agency 
specializing in matching Birth- 
mothers with Families nation- 
wide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. 
Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift 
Adoptions. 866-413-6293. Void 
in Illinois/New Mexico/Indiana. 
(AAN CAN) 


HEALTH/HTNESS 

VIAGRA VIAGRA 1 0OMG, 40 
pills-i-/4 free, only $99.00. Save 
Big Now! Discreet shipping. 
Call 1-800-374-2619 (AAN CAN) 


HOME 

KILL BED BUGS Buy Harris 
Bed Bug Killer Complete Treat- 
ment Program/Kit. Effective 
results begin after spray dries. 
Available: Hardware Stores, 

Buy Online: thehomedepot. 
com (AAN CAN) 


LICENSED 
MASSAGE 

ALL 

BADASS MASSAGE 
BY AVERY HOMER 

$100/60min & $130/90min 
1250-1- fans on Facebook 
9-1- years of experience 
Strong male Masseur 
Call or text today 
512-203-1720 
LMT1 03481 
512-203-1720 


ALTERNATIVE 

Therapist Trained 
in Pampering. 

Mon-Thur 10-5pm 
Jollyville Rd between Oak Knoll 
and Spicewood Springs, paral- 
lel to Hwy 183 N. 

Gisela 638-5768 LMT#19847 


ALTERNATIVE Esalen, 28 
years experience. Perfect relax- 
ation massage. Private setting. 
Shower. Convenient 
location. $10 off. Janet, 892- 
8877. LMT#2271. 


ALTERNATIVE LMT 31534 
Sore/Painful Back/Hips or 
Feet? HELP YOURSELF! Call 
“Dr” Kat 51 2-445-0280 


ALTERNATIVE LMT 31534 
Tired/Achy/Sore/Stiff 
Shoulders or Neck? HELP 
YOURSELF! Call “Dr” Kat 
512-445-0280 


ALTERNATIVE LMT# 31534 
Hearing Loss?/Dry Eyes?/TMJ 
problems? 

Call “The Fixer” 512-445-0280 


ALTERNATIVE lmt#31534 

??DRAPING?? 

THATS FOR WINDOWS.. 

Call KAT 5 12-445-0280 


ALTERNATIVE lmt#31534 
Massages are like a box of 
chocolates.. .ya never know. 
Call Kathleen 512-445-0280 


DEEP TISSUE 

MAGIC PALMS 

YOU DESERVE TO BE PAM- 
PERED 

Swedish, Deep Tissue, Sensu- 
ous & Relaxation 
Relieve stress, headache, pain 
and soreness, or just relax 
and enjoy. 

Specializing in Lower Back 
Pain. 

Masseuse Birthday Party On 

Friday Aft -i- Eve 

RSVP 

$45 50-MINUTE MASSAGE 
TUESDAY, FRIDAY, 
SATURDAY 
$5 DISCOUNT FOR 
PREVIOUS DAY APPT 
NEW PRICE: 

100- # OF HOURS BOOKED 
AHEAD OF TIME 
$40 MAX 

Appologies I am not able to be 
in my office 24/7 
111 W Anderson Ln 
Open lOam-llpm. 

Katrina (LMT45388) 

Outcalls noon to late night. 
Same Day Appts call before 
8pm. 

512-281-6274 

GENERAL 

A FULL 

BODY MASSAGE 

by Mary Ellen 

• Deep Tissue/Swedish 

• Herbal Baths Warm Oils 

• Hot Tub Massage 

• Private Home Studio 

• Luxury Outcall Available 
MC/VISA (RMT#9644) 

512-917-9656 

GENERAL 

AWESOME 
TOUCH MASSAGE 

Professional, relaxing, and 
healing massage. 

Heated table, mature clients 
preferred 

Discounts for returning clients/ 
referrals 

Supports Wounded Warrior 
project 

New South Location! 

Athletes Domain 

www.awesometouch.com 

LMT#2474 

Call Sandy (512)656-5445 


GENERAL 

SOOTHING MASSAGE. 
Swedish, Deep Relaxation, 
Amazing Touch, Full Body Mas- 
sage, Acupressure. By Appoint- 
ment ONLY. 512-258-1592 In 
Call North Austin on Jollyville 
Road LMT 042276 


GENERAL Treat yourself to a 
relaxing hot oil, full-body Swed- 
ish massage in a candle-lit, 
private room/shower, 24/7, in/ 
out calls. Clint 775-9164 - LMT# 
34842 


RELAXATION Massage by 
male therapist. Call Greg for 
soothing, deep tissue massage. 
In/Out calls. LMT# 22435. Cell 
512-496-3527. 


RELAXATION Full Body 
Massage for the discriminating 
man. Soothing techniques to 
remedy your needs. Weekdays 
5PM-9PM, Fridays 1-9, Wkends/ 
Holidays 10AM-9PM. Near 
Zilker Park LMT#032673. Don 
970-1131 


THERAPEUTIC Reduce pain 
and stress. Best professional 
therapeutic massage to relieve, 
relax, and revitalize. 

Easy access from North & Cen- 
tral Austin. Great Rates! 512- 
789-6278, Nanette, LMT017147 


WONDERFUL AND HEALING 

Soothing, nurturing & thera- 
peutic massage. 14-yrs exp. 
Beautiful setting. 7 days. Judy: 
512.258.4679 LMT #010974 


PSYCHIC/ 

ASTROLOGY 


ASTROSPIRITUAL 


Astrological-spiritual 
consultation. 25-l-yrs 
experience. Guidance, 
practical advise and positive 
outlook on life opportunities. 
Call(512) 256-3812 


BODY AND SOUL ‘Thousands 
of women standing on a cliff 
throwing little pickles at you? 
Why am I the only one that has 
that dream?” Find a psychic in 
The Austin Chronicle’s Body & 
Soul Section. 


TAROT READINGS Austin 
Unique. Clear answers/new 
insights. Donations only 512- 
569-4767. 


TRAVEL 

VACATIONS 

ITALY TOURS 
$100 OFF! 

- New Year’s in Sicily - 

Dec 26/Jan 4 

- Sicily: Taormina, Agrigento, 
Siracusa, Palermo - Jun 7/16 
-Venice, Florence, Rome, 
Amalfi Coast, Pompeii - 

Jun 15/26 
Elsa Gramola 

ATasteOfltalylnAustin.com 
Italy Tours | Italian Language | 
Cooking Classes 
512.345.8941 | Elsa@ATas- 
teOfltalylnAustin.com 


PLEASE CHECK YOUR AD 

for accuracy the first time it 
runs. The Austin Chronicle is 
not responsible for copy errors 
after the first week of publica- 
tion. The Austin Chronicle’s 
liability for errors is limited to 
the cost of the space occuped 
by the error, with a maximum 
liability of republication. Cor- 
rections must be submitted by 
Tuesday, 1pm. 


WEBSITE Looking for some- 
thing more? Check out austin- 
chronicle.com/classifieds for 
even more great ads online. 



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OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 1 0AM-7PM 

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austinchronicle.com AUGUST 8, 2014 the Austin chronicle 91 









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CAILING Ml ARTISTS! 

Apply online at BlueGenieArtBazaar.com 

SEMEN DONORS NEEDED 

$100 per specimen. Healthy college 
educated males, 18-39 years old. For an 
application visit beaspermdonor.com 

** MIDTOWNE SPA ** 

A PRIVATE MEN'S HEALTH CLUB 

5815 Airport Blvd. - 302-9696 
Gay. Bi. Curious 
Free managers guided tour Tue 2-4 
Find us on Facebook 

PUNK* ROCK* GOTH 

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New/Used secretoktober.com 2101 S. 1st. 

COME AND GET 'EM! 

Free (used) Padded Mailing Envelopes 
Great for Promo, Marketing, Hoarding 

CHRONICLE OFFICE: 4000 N IH35, 78751 

ADDICTED TO PAIN MEDS? 

Suboxone Detox / Maintenance 
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(512) 474-5904 www.poppswebsite.com 

MOTORBLADE.COM 

Fritz the poster dude puts fliers 
in 200 legal spots $60/wk» 512-554-4034 


ITALIAN BARGE PARTY 
ON LAKE TRAVIS 
&FREE TOUR IN ITALY 

Sunday, August 17 from 6:00pm to 9:00pm 
$ 25 (3 hours in the lake + pizza + drawing 
for a free Italy Tour) 
For more info, contact 
Elsa@ATasteOfltalylnAustin.com 

WILD LOCAL SINGLES 

BROWSE ADS & REPLY FREE 

Straight 512-457-1900 Gay/Bi 512-480-8400 
Use FREE Code 7683,18+ 

IS ADOPTION 
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Discuss all options for your pregnancy. 
You’re our first priority and you’re in charge! 
Living expenses paid. Call to see how friendly 
we are! 512-992-9466 or 1-800-456-4862 
www.ChildrensConnections.org 

WHETSTONE AUDIO 

Two Channel Music Systems from $300 up 
to$100K+ 

Turntables, Cartridges, Tube / Solid State 
amps. Speakers, Headphones & RECORDS! 

www.whetstoneaudio.com 

512-477-8503 


READY TO QUIT SMOKING? 

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KID ENTERTAINERS 

Will Train $10/HR-$70/HR 
toll free 888-458-7247 
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WE PAY CASH FOR OLD 
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75% OFF RETAIl! 

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REVIVAL VINTAGE 

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MICKLETHWAIT 
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Kids under T2 get n FREE! 



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demonstrations and information about the classes. 


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